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7

There are no Shimano brifters that are 2x11 compatible, but Microshift manufactures some. I use a Microshift SB-110 (1x11) and a bar-end shifter for a drop-bar 3x11 setup with an XT rear derailleur (RD-M8000) and XTR front derailleur (FD-M9000) with no issues. Here is Microshift's product page for the SB-110: https://www.microshift.com/en/product/sb-m110/


4

As already noted in other answers, there is no compatible unit. The pull ratio is different. However, given the typical prices of brifters and derailleurs, I think it would be better to buy a new 11-speed derailleur that is compatible with your new brifters - such as the Shimano GRX. It will be better than some extra units for pull ratio conversion. The ...


0

I have this MTB with Deore M5100 groupset (2 x 11 speed) and I want to convert this MTB to gravel bike. Is there any brifter compatible for this series? Unfortunately, the times are not good for doing flat bar to drop bar conversion. I did such a conversion on a bicycle with V brakes and 8 speed drivertrain. I only needed bar-end shifters and drop bar V ...


3

Unfortunately 11 speed MTB and 11 speed road have different pull ratios. You could use this adapter/converter: https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/products/tanpan It should allow you to keep using your existing rear derailleur and cassette.


2

Assuming your shifters are SL-M5100 https://bike.shimano.com/en-SG/product/component/deore-m5100/SL-M5100-L.html https://bike.shimano.com/en-SG/product/component/deore-m5100/SL-M5100-R.html Then the product matrix at https://productinfo.shimano.com/#/com?cid=C-432&acid=C-435 says no. Sadly the "gravel bike" specific groupsets are based on ...


0

With the 'invention' of the gravel bike, i see this as an easy choice. Their whole reason to exist is largely based on the compromises described in the question; the ability to ride gravel tracks without sacrificing much on the tarmac sections that link them up. However, even within the gravel bike category, there is a very wide range of options, features ...


0

Do yourself a favor and look at the problem with a different perspective. Spend a small amount of money on an aluminum front suspension bicycle - see "Note 2" at end. Make sure it has a mid range gear system and a good set of rims for example touring rims; I'm very happy with my AlexRims G3000 after heavy use (125+kg weight with gear, forest roads ...


-1

Trek Checkpoint ALR period. Is very very capable machine. I ride it to the grocery stores, commute to work and take it on my overnight rides to the woods.


4

"whether it's a reasonable goal to try to make your gravel bike 'more road bike-like' with different tires" It is. "and how to achieve it." By mounting a road tyre. That is all there is to it. We can then get into long arguments between the proponents of Continental vs. Schwalbe, vs Challenge vs. Vittoria vs. Tufo vs. whatever... It is ...


3

If you are mainly riding on tarmac roads, then it is perfectly reasonable to mount slick tires. In my experience, slick tires are fine even on dirt roads, e.g. up to grade 2 in the Cyclingtips classification of gravel surfaces (it's an ordinal scale ranging from bad roads at grade 1 to very large rock chunks at grade 4; the latter is described as nearly MTB ...


3

If you want a road tire that actually will result in more speed at the same effort, I found the Continental GP 5000 did that. I do not have a power meter, but rode the same route in a similar manner as in same gears, cadence, and heart rate. I was about 3% faster when it came to average speed for the ride coming from Bontrager R3s. Qualitatively the tires ...


-4

I have a 2020 Giant Revolt 3 (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/revolt-advanced-3) gravel bike that I ride 99% on tarmac. I was considering a road bike, but as I was coming from a mountain bike background and had never ridden a road bike, this seemed a good compromise. You made a good choice. Gravel bikes are far more optimal on the road than road bikes for ...


2

We're not into product recommendations; you should peruse cycling websites that list and review such things and see what is available to buy (locally or local shipping) But in general, you'd want a tire with a slick/low profile rolling center band with more knobby sides. Or go with a tire with minimal "texture" (I don't know the exact word).


3

If drop handle bars are not your priority, I would also recommend considering hybrids with front suspensions. Their advantages are the versatility and the price. They are jacks of all trades, master of none. They will be less good on roads than gravel/CX bikes and less capable offroaders than cross country MTBs, but better on road than cross country MTBs and ...


0

The bike style most suitable for your use is a reasonable drop bar bike. Some time ago, the only reasonable drop bar bikes one could find were cyclocross and touring bikes. If you made the mistake of purchasing a "road" bike thinking you ride on roads and thus a "road" bike is optimal, you'll find the frame is reduced to such light weight ...


5

Gravel bikes, with gravel tyres, will indeed be a bit slower, but it is still a perfectly usable bike for road riding as well. I do not really see a meaningful difference between a road bike with cheap tyres and a gravel bike with more expensive tyres. I do most of my road riding on a gravel bike because I have a place for only one bike where I work. Unless ...


22

"a decent chunk of money on one bike" this is a very slippery slope. If this is your first bike, look for a used hardtail MTB for relatively low cost, and simply store any leftover money. You'll want to buy accessories over time like helmet, tools and lights and so on. Ideally the fork would have a working "lockout" lever, to disable ...


4

Any of them would be fine, subject to tyres, and the ranges of geometries for each name overlap anyway, when you consider multiple manufacturers. A further category some manufacturers use is "adventure road". The frame can take a lot, but rough stuff can get quite hard on the rider if the bike isn't appropriate. I take a (steel) tourer over all ...


11

A few considerations: You have two competing characteristics here: You want a bike that excels at the niche you enjoy the most. You also want the bike to be capable of handing the other niches to an extent you’re happy with. For example, if you enjoy road riding the most and therefore pick a road bike, you won’t be very capable off-road even though you ...


2

No, not officially. The authorative document is https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/grx-11-speed/RD-RX810.html which says MODEL NO RD-RX810 SERIES GRX 11-speed Low sprocket_Max. 34T Low sprocket_Min. 30T Max. front difference 17T Top sprocket_Min and Max. 11T Total capacity 40T So the minimum and maximum tooth count on your cassette is ...


0

TLDR When selecting a frame / bike the most important factor is that you have decided for yourself what you like in ride feel for your application. Test ride several bikes and develop your knowledge of what feels good to you / fits your riding style and then buy the bike that works best for you. You may want to rent different bikes so you can test them in ...


1

My experiences here differ from some others. I have 2 sets of wheels from the same brand (hunt) 1 700c aero 25mm and 1 650b fat 38mm gravel. Both disc but the gravel wheels with a 11-34 and the aero wheels with a 11-30. Moth mechs were med-cage (GS). Originally 1 was Tiagra now its 105 5800. The other 105 5800. Absolutely no disk rub or shifting issues.


1

There isn't really a coherent RX600 groupset. Basically GRX is a glossy re-marketing exercise for a bunch of different parts from different sources The RX400 rd is a repurposed Deore T6000 and designed for 32-36t cassettes. It would shift both 10 and 11 speed road perfectly but it's not a good choice when you hope to fit narrower cassettes, it's much more ...


6

The min large sprocket size that Shimano specifies for the RD-RX810 is 30 teeth. A 28 might work ok but I’d personally stick with 30. As others have mentioned swapping wheels is not plug and play. The disc rotor and cassette end up in slightly different lateral positions which requires derailleur and caliper adjustments. Using identical model hubs should ...


8

My experience with swapping wheels is disappointing. I had to adjust the derailleur (limit screws, cable tension) and rim brakes (due to slight difference in rim width and dish) every time I swapped wheels. Maybe if you have exactly the same hub and rims on both wheels it will work better. I think my derailleur adjustments were necessary because the cassette ...


3

No, Microshift is usually compatible with Shimano (As far as I know, all except Advent 9 speed), but Shimano 8 speed is not compatible with Shimano 11 speed as the derailleurs have different pull ratios.


1

So you want to use an 8 speed microshift-brand shifter with an 11 speed rear derailleur? The cable pull ratio will not work for you, regardless if you have an 8 or 11 speed cassette. Your best option (ie the safest) is to use all 8 speed or all 11 speed parts. That means rear derailleur, right-hand shifter, cassette, and chain, and it would be advisable to ...


1

@ArgentiApparatus is correct - 9 clicks is 10 speeds. Your lever starts at one end, in a gear position, and the first click puts it into the second position. Thus there is one fewer click than gear positions. You definitely have a 10 speed shifter, confirmed by https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/grx-10-speed/ST-RX400-R.html There remains the ...


2

"Gravel" means different things to different people. Yes, you could ride 28-mm tires on most hike-and-bike trails paved in gravel, but you could ride narrower tires than that too; there are other gravel roads that would require more like 43-mm tires. I think Cinelli is being a bit self-serving here. There are a few places where you would need to ...


5

I'm looking forward to gaining more tyre clearance by swapping the current 700c wheels with 650b or even 26 inch wheel. Even if you mounted a pair of long reach calipers (probably something like the Tektro 559, which has a reach of 55-73mm, but I'm not sure if they're still made), you would probably not have enough room to fit big tires. The chain stays, ...


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