Hot answers tagged

26

Stuff To Use: Silicone based lubricant - for all weather conditions - especially good to use in wet or in winter - it's water resistant. It's thicker than teflon based and it's sticky (dust catches onto it making a paste - needs to be re-applied when dirt accumulates). Teflon based lubricant - for dry conditions only, thinner and runs smoother than silicon ...


17

I started getting seriously into bike work circa 2002 and was lucky enough to come across Jobst Brandt's view of the topic around that time. Since then, most of which time I've spent working as a mechanic, I've observed that the Brandtian observations of the mechanical dynamics at hand are wholly correct, but I don't agree with him on what to do about it. He ...


15

Chain lube goes on the chain. It's liquid and it drips on. We used to use "oil" for this but now there are lubes that are better engineered to provide lubrication without collecting dirt, washing off in the rain, breaking down chemically, etc. You also use this kind of liquid lube on brake pivots, derailleur pulleys and pivots. Probably not the ...


11

Yes, totally suitable. Of all the remotely common grease types, there's not really a scenario on bikes where the type matters for this application unless it's a titanium or stainless frame, and then use anti-seize. As someone who presses things into bike frames on a regular basis and lives/works in a rainy climate, I do always use grease, but it's primarily ...


10

It might be a facetious answer on the face, but seriously - why are you carrying your bike at all? Do carry a working mini-tube, pump, two tyre levers and whatever you need to get the wheel completely off if its not a QR (ring spanner, perhaps allen key, maybe special tool for IGHs etc) Some people like disposable gloves for the hand protection. Replace ...


10

Adding to James Keuning's answer: The way I think about lube and grease is that basically, grease is for things that don't get taken apart as much, and lube is for parts that get more care, more often, and are usually more easily accessible. This absolutely does not mean that bikes do not need grease or that it isn't as important as 'lube'. I use lube on ...


10

Searching for "ndm rotational speed" finds that D and d are outer and inner diameters of the bearing. n is not the usual symbol for speed, but neither is the final unit "millimeters per minute divided by pi" an usual unit. And here we go: A slightly optimistic approximation for road bike speed would be 10 m/s (36 km/h, 22.5 mph) and wheel circumference 2 m....


10

Keeping tabs on the condition of the hub as you describe could provide some interesting data that does relate to how in need of maintenance it is, but it also has these issues if you were trying to use it as the only indicator: Spinning it as fast as you can makes it hard to spin it with the same amount of force each time, which is needed in order for your ...


9

Each kind of grease will perform best at a certain temperature. And is designed for a certain speed of movement of the parts it is used at to reach and not exceed that temperature. So yes, it is worth it to use the special grease for bikes or get an other kind of grease that is designed for the speeds/temperature your parts will get. I found that when a ...


9

Basically every metal-in-metal thread on a bike should get some kind of treatment, because at the very least none of them are perfectly corrosion resistant, and as you say, thread lubrication helps with tightening. What it really does is greatly reduce all the many factors that create friction in threads, usually into the negligible range, so that a given ...


9

I've seen recipes for decontaminating brake pads floated around but the easiest and safest thing to do is simply replace them.


9

I usually put a very small amount of grease on the threads at the end so that it will be easier to remove when you need to take it out again. As with all threaded connections these tend to seize-up over time especially when exposed to water. This is similar to what you do when installing your pedals.


8

Some mechanic might have put a liberal amount of grease in the BB shell and also in the head-tube prior to assembly. Then copiously greased the seat-post as well. Grease has a tendency to migrate, especially in hot weather and move to the strangest places, the bike may have been stored upside down, head or tail-up. Think of it as a gift from whoever put it ...


8

The problem with unloaded (no outside weight/force applied) spin tests is that grease is viscous. An unloaded bearing without grease can actually spin more easily than a properly packed one. It’s only under load that grease will improve performance and the losses due to its viscosity can be neglected¹. So take out the wheel, spin the axle by hand. Check if ...


7

Just as a confirmation on the comments above, I found a post on a separate forum definitely recommending to use the specific manufacturer grease, with a couple of the following points (Cited here for possible link decay): For the grease itself- Since my original post I have found some good information about lubricating the Shimano roller brakes. Definitely ...


7

Some greases really are special. But in other cases the grease doesn't really matter. Since so many companies just say to use their approved grease, it can be hard to tell apart which applications are really special and which ones don't really matter. There are some applications where you should only use the approved grease and using the wrong grease really ...


7

Grease will do much more to protect it than nothing, with many mechanics preferring marine-grade grease if near the ocean or salted roads. Optimally, you should use an anti-seize compound. In general: Grease - Parts that always move and are protected (bearings and shifting system). For operating temperatures and pressures of bikes, the type of grease is ...


7

Information about what to grease on a through-axle can be contradicting even for the same model of an axle. An example below. Santa Cruz uses DT Swiss axles for their frames. The instructions on their website state that you should grease both the shaft and and the threaded part: However, DT Swiss' instructions for the same axle state that the threads "...


7

I have a different question for you. What happens if the thru-axle threads and shaft are not greased (or the grease has washed out)? Answers: On a Cube eMTB with a 12mm rear thru axle and a Shimano XT hub, left undisturbed for 3 years between services but ridden quite hard at trail centres: It took nearly an hour (including thinking time) to gently persuade ...


7

I don't know much about the actual science of race day watt-saving as it applies here, and neither do most racers or mechanics. When people use low quantities of grease, or just run oil or lower-viscosity grease such as suspension greases in hub applications, it's not simply a given that you will actually have less friction under load. Maybe it's great, but ...


6

The skewer isn't an axle so nothing rotates and it and there's no need for grease. It's more likely that the wheels aren't completely straight in the dropouts causing the brakes or tyres to rub. I tend to tighten the skewers with the bike's weight on the wheels, rather than on a work stand. But you should also check the sequence of components again as well. ...


6

Looks like it was stored upside down at some point. When you do this, the air bubble moves to the bottom and can take some time to return to the top. See also, Nutella, Marmite and other viscous gloops.


5

Different greases hold up varyingly well in different applications, depending on levels of dust, water, temperature, etc. Park Tool Polylube PPL-1/2 are your basic bicycle greases -- they hold up well under most people's riding conditions (including repelling water enough; others like Phil Wood or Park Tool HPG-1 might be more water repelling). Depending ...


5

That is old grease with debris in it, this will be shavings of the bearings and their channel. Before re-greasing the headset you will need to degrease it to remove all of the old grease, otherwise the old grease will attack the new grease rendering it less effective. Then once degreased you will then need to clean out all of the degreaser (again so it ...


5

This is for your specific bike. Must grease: Pedal threads Seatpost unless frame or post are carbon, then must apply carbon prep instead Things that usually have an adequate amount of grease or other prep pre-applied, but should be checked and greased otherwise: BB threads Stem bolts (many are pre-loctited and don't need extra lubrication if so) Crank ...


5

Park Tool Repair says greasing the spindle is 'an option', but says it is to prevent corrosion, rather than having any effect on how the crank goes on the spindle. Slathering grease on is seems like a waste as most is going to get pushed out of the joint.


5

Antiseize/copper grease is theoretically better, but plain old grease will work just fine. There’s no relative motion here, so lubricity is not a factor. All we are looking for is adding corrosion resistance to avoid sprockets being fused to the freehub body or the lockring getting stuck. I personally use grease on the freehub body and antiseize on the ...


5

I assume these are cup and cone hubs. The easy answer is that you can’t go wrong with a 100% fill. In a video on their YouTube channel, Calvin Jones of Park Tools recommended “lots” of grease, by which he meant put a bed of grease down, put the bearings on top of that, and put some more grease on top. In a cup and cone hub, excess grease would just get ...


4

Grease itself does has various characteristic depends on application. Unless you are going to submerge your bicycle and keep cycling, otherwise general purpose grease will do the job. Just a plain copy and paste : Water Resistance Applications where the process employs water-based coolants or process chemicals have multiple problems to address. Water ...


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