Hot answers tagged

17

Stuff To Use: Silicone based lubricant - for all weather conditions - especially good to use in wet or in winter - it's water resistant. It's thicker than teflon based and it's sticky (dust catches onto it making a paste - needs to be re-applied when dirt accumulates). Teflon based lubricant - for dry conditions only, thinner and runs smoother than silicon ...


14

Chain lube goes on the chain. It's liquid and it drips on. We used to use "oil" for this but now there are lubes that a better engineered to provide lubrication without collecting dirt, washing off in the rain, breaking down chemically, etc. You also use this kind of liquid lube on brake pivots, derailleur pulleys and pivots. Probably not the same stuff you ...


10

It might be a facetious answer on the face, but seriously - why are you carrying your bike at all? Do carry a working mini-tube, pump, two tyre levers and whatever you need to get the wheel completely off if its not a QR (ring spanner, perhaps allen key, maybe special tool for IGHs etc) Some people like disposable gloves for the hand protection. ...


10

Adding to James Keuning's answer: The way I think about lube and grease is that basically, grease is for things that don't get taken apart as much, and lube is for parts that get more care, more often, and are usually more easily accessible. This absolutely does not mean that bikes do not need grease or that it isn't as important as 'lube'. I use lube on ...


9

Basically every metal-in-metal thread on a bike should get some kind of treatment, because at the very least none of them are perfectly corrosion resistant, and as you say, thread lubrication helps with tightening. What it really does is greatly reduce all the many factors that create friction in threads, usually into the negligible range, so that a given ...


8

Each kind of grease will perform best at a certain temperature. And is designed for a certain speed of movement of the parts it is used at to reach and not exceed that temperature. So yes, it is worth it to use the special grease for bikes or get an other kind of grease that is designed for the speeds/temperature your parts will get. I found that when a ...


6

Looks like it was stored upside down at some point. When you do this, the air bubble moves to the bottom and can take some time to return to the top. See also, Nutella, Marmite and other viscous gloops.


5

That is old grease with debris in it, this will be shavings of the bearings and their channel. Before re-greasing the headset you will need to degrease it to remove all of the old grease, otherwise the old grease will attack the new grease rendering it less effective. Then once degreased you will then need to clean out all of the degreaser (again so it ...


5

The skewer isn't an axle so nothing rotates and it and there's no need for grease. It's more likely that the wheels aren't completely straight in the dropouts causing the brakes or tyres to rub. I tend to tighten the skewers with the bike's weight on the wheels, rather than on a work stand. But you should also check the sequence of components again as well. ...


5

Don't ride before servicing thos-e pedals. A poorly greased or loose pedal will ruin the thread of the crank or may even cause breakage of the pedal axle. A correctly tightened but non-greased pedal thread may cause the threads to fuse. You should remove both pedals, clean the threads and the crank arms, apply grease and thread them back in. In case you own ...


5

Different greases hold up varyingly well in different applications, depending on levels of dust, water, temperature, etc. Park Tool Polylube PPL-1/2 are your basic bicycle greases -- they hold up well under most people's riding conditions (including repelling water enough; others like Phil Wood or Park Tool HPG-1 might be more water repelling). Depending ...


4

One major function of grease on bikes is waterproofing, e.g. for bearings. Since the bearings on a bike typically move slowly (no more than a few hundred rpm for hub bearings and significantly slower for everything else) you should pack them with quite a bit of grease to provide the best protection from ingress of water and dirt. It's also a good idea to ...


4

Just as a confirmation on the comments above, I found a post on a separate forum definitely recommending to use the specific manufacturer grease, with a couple of the following points (Cited here for possible link decay): For the grease itself- Since my original post I have found some good information about lubricating the Shimano roller brakes. ...


4

Grease itself does has various characteristic depends on application. Unless you are going to submerge your bicycle and keep cycling, otherwise general purpose grease will do the job. Just a plain copy and paste : Water Resistance Applications where the process employs water-based coolants or process chemicals have multiple problems to address. Water ...


4

It's a surprisingly tricky conversation. All the differences at play are so close to totally negligible, it can be easy to tally them up differently. It mostly just doesn't matter as long as it's some type of conventional bearing grease. In terms of how well a bearing system full of a given grease is going to function, if the bike is ever going to get ...


4

Most people who aren't using a manufacturer grease are using a high temp automotive grease. I'd suggest looking at the manufacturer's recommendations and following them; brakes aren't a place to save a few bucks. 220 C seems low for the type of grease; people have failures with high temp automotive greases which often rated for 100 C+ higher than that on ...


4

I'm going to offer the contrary answer - why not fix it properly? Summary: Your spindle/crank interface is damaged, so the crank has been forced onto the spindle and is now at a high state of torque. Its confirmed that the spindle is damaged and likely that the crank arm is now damaged as a result. And the rest of the bike is OK. So the worst case is ...


4

It is my belief that this fear is overstated, and I'd simply use Park polylube. (I've seen threads where boat mechanics discuss using their favorite marine grease on all their bike parts with no ill effects.) If worried and wanting to spend more, I'd use suspension grease, which is by definition going on plastic/rubber seals. A couple of the more popular ...


3

The shop mechanic may have judged there was already enough grease on the crank threads and more was not required. Only a small amount is sufficient. It will not hurt to check and apply a bit more though. What is more important is tightening the pedals to the correct torque. As mention in other answers loose steel pedals axles can destroy alloy crank arms ...


3

All of the bearings take the same thing (except for freewheel/cassette, which doesn't need grease). You can use generic (for metal) grease. Just make sure it's thick. Bicycle-specific stuff is likely to be no better and more expensive. Obviously, if you have ceramic bearings or other fancy stuff, you should get bicycle-specific grease.


3

I carry my 29er mountain bike all the time because I go up a few flights of stairs most days. What works best for me is grabbing by the tube in front of the seat and lifting my hand to my shoulder and holding it in my hand. I can then keep it away from my clothing. The bike usually just hangs from the hand, or the hand and the elbow sometimes if it swings ...


3

The grease on a coil spring is purely to reduce friction between the spring and the fork leg/stanchion. The choice of grease is non-critical beyond ensuring that it is compatible with the existing grease (or you clean the fork thoroughly to remove the old grease) and that it will not damage the seals. Natural rubber seals can be damaged by petroleum based ...


3

Daniel R Hicks's answer-as-a-comment: As it says, it's intended for lubricating sliding parts. Not ideal for ball bearings. – Daniel R Hicks 2015-06-23 11:48:24Z "Dry lubricants" are not a good choice for ball bearings, as they do not exclude water. The #1 role of bicycle bearing grease is to keep water out. – Daniel R Hicks 2015-06-25 12:05:18Z


3

Some pedals don't spin particularly freely from new. This is OK as the friction does not increase with load and is a tiny power loss. Often happens on MTB pedals to get a tight seal to keep rubbish out - after a short time rubbish in the bearing costs more than the seal in terms of power loss. If the pedals used to spin freely, you possibly throwing away a ...


2

There is no problem in going for automotive grease in bearing (hubs, bottom bracket and headset). This is not the perfect lubricant, but you have a cheap bike, probably don't want to spend the $10 in grease, and truth is that a clean bottom bracket with a thick grease is better than what you currently have. Besides, these parts are not exposed so you really ...


2

A dedicated grease with optimized properties for the application/operation temperature is always best. Automotive brake grease, while not ideal, won't cause any damage to your bicycle. Naturally one uses MUCH less grease on a bicycle compared to on a car, therefore the cost of grease is negligible compared to other consumables for private repairs.


2

Don't use degreaser on the insides of an IGH! Not! Ever! For Shimano Nexus/Alfine you are supposed to use the same oil for cleaning and lubrication. For Rohloff there is a separate cleaning oil which I think has lower viscosity than the lubrication oil. Also you replace the oil at most once a year or every 5000km, not more often. Some hubs might need ...


2

NLGI 3 is harder than optimal. Shouldn't create a problem, but NLGI 2 should provide better lubrication and still be hard enough to resist being pushed and washed out of the bearings (all else being equal). Hubs are spinning when used, and at relatively low speed, so no need to worry about lubricant starvation. The harder the grease and the more viscous the ...


2

I think Nathan Knutson covered the topic quite well, but I would like to round it out with one exception: the disc rotor bolts need blue Loctite threadlocker, because those usually thread into an aluminium hub, and yet they should stay immobile for the lifetime of the rotor. And they should stay fixed in place without relying on high torque, unlike most ...


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