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3

You want a "goldilocks" amount. Not too much: that can stop the bearing balls from turning and encourage skidding, Not too little: then there's more metal-on-metal contact which is bad. Just right: The range is quite wide - you need enough to keep the metals slightly apart. Bicycles are low load, low speed, and low temperature bearings compared to ...


7

I don't know much about the actual science of race day watt-saving as it applies here, and neither do most racers or mechanics. When people use low quantities of grease, or just run oil or lower-viscosity grease such as suspension greases in hub applications, it's not simply a given that you will actually have less friction under load. Maybe it's great, but ...


5

I assume these are cup and cone hubs. The easy answer is that you can’t go wrong with a 100% fill. In a video on their YouTube channel, Calvin Jones of Park Tools recommended “lots” of grease, by which he meant put a bed of grease down, put the bearings on top of that, and put some more grease on top. In a cup and cone hub, excess grease would just get ...


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