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15

Disc brake pads are very sensitive to contamination. You can clean the disc rotors with rubbing alcohol, but that's about it. Anything else will contaminate the pads. You may not be able to restore the pads. The easiest and surest thing would be to replace the pads. If you want to try to restore the pads, get some "drywall sanding screen", remove ...


12

Cycling gloves are designed for comfort and to improve grip by absorbing sweat and providing a contact material that provides grip even when damp or wet. Typically, hands do not sweat much so most cycling gloves will help in this regards.


11

Your question suggests that you might hold your handle bars too tight. A tense grip over a long tube leads inevitably to cramps. If you are not going over technical terrain or going very fast it is usually safe to change grips and hold bars much more loosely. With experience you will develop a firm but not too tight grip also in technical sections. ...


9

I really think this is a fit issue (e.g., changing the bar height and/or reach, how you hold the bar) rather than finding softer grips or padded gloves. Numbness should be taken seriously (as it can lead to permanent damage if left unattended). Padding tends to help deal with issues associated with high frequency vibrations, rather than too much pressure ...


8

A thumb /trigger shifter has been developed for the Rohloff speed hub. It has been manufactured by Cinq5 and is called Shift:R. It involves two levers one for up-shifting and one for down-shifting. I assume it will take some ride time to get used to the new and some what unusual methodology. They are not inexpensive. Reviews have pros and cons so you would ...


8

You would be entering in a very busy market with no obvious advantages. Let's look at the two types of LEDs that you might use: If you're using inexpensive and low-power 5050 LEDs (15 lumens@350mW; usually ganged in groups), then you could power the lights off button cells (two CR2032s would power one 5050 LED for about 3 hours; 3 x 5050s for one hour) but ...


7

It is a little hard to tell from your photos, but do you have grip shifters? For setups with grip shifters, the grips are generally much shorter / narrower, as part of the "grip surface" is the shifter itself. If you do indeed have grip shifters, you can do as ojs suggested & move the shifters / brakes in towards the stem, or, you could return the ...


7

A few things I have done that seem to help. Swap your grips to something with an ergo design. This type has a paddle like shape. The larger width spreads the weight to a larger contact area. Another advantage is these grips tend to have a larger diameter. The larger size makes it easier to grip. Check your fork settings. Unless you are currently bottoming ...


7

Brakleen or another automotive brake cleaner will work. It is stronger than alcohol and should have no problem removing w40 and most other lubes.


5

Have a look at Sheldon Brown's handlebar reference. It lists typical clamp and outer bar diameters. Unfortunately it does not contain oversized mountain bike handlebars, like your 31.8 mm riser bar. I suspect that the typical diameter for mountain bike bars at the handles at the grips is still 22.2 mm. You may see in the table that while the clamp diameter ...


5

You could try: adding some bar ends, or ergonomic grips like Ergon GP2+, to allow you to change grip position move your saddle further forward on its rails, to take some of the weight off your hands


4

Any liquiid-fluid works for grip installation. The liquid temporarily decreases the surface friction between the grip and the bar, and then departs. Personally I use soapy water which evaporates over time, leaving the slightly tacky soap behind to discourage twist in the grip. WD40 has some mild petroleum products in it which may damage some rubber ...


4

The hand receives its peripheral nerve supply from well-defined nerves such as the radial and median nerve which are involved with sensation to the thumb. The median nerve often gets pinched, and the result is numbness. Sometimes, weakness can also result, particularly of the muscles that bend the thumb towards the little finger. The most common place for ...


4

Grips will not wrap the brake levers. You have several options: Find a compatible brake lever which has plastic levers Wrap the brake levers in something (a few layers of heat shrink tubing, plasti-dip, a bit of plastic/vinyl tubing like you get for refrigerator water hoses, brake lever covers (they exist for motorcycles, so I suspect you can find them ...


4

You can move the brake and shift levers inward. They are tightened around the handlebar with hex bolts or screws, you can loosen these and move the parts around. If the result feels too narrow, you can change to a wider handlebar. Edit: See the other answer for solution with grip shifters.


3

I remember this would happen to me as a kid while on my bmx bike especially in humid summer weather. So you are buying new grips already - I'd say make sure they are a harder compound than whatever your current ones are. Seems like harder rubber is less likely to deform/melt away. With your current grips you might try wrapping them in bar tape. There are ...


3

If you have access to a compressor, compressed air works well – use the hole in the end of the grip to blow in air while covering the other end of the bars with your hand (or something). The air escaping around the grip opens it up enough that it is easy to slide on. Rubbing alcohol can be used as a lubricant. It will evaporate leaving the grips snug on the ...


3

A razor blade/knife/x-acto knife should cut it. Hockey shops have special knifes for cutting through hockey tape if you want a specialized device. This shouldn't be a problem for non-carbon bars though, if you're careful. The residue can be removed with rubbing alcohol or soapy water or mineral spirits (again, for carbon, I'm not sure what you'd do).


3

Since no one else mentioned this: I always use a glass/window cleaner (like Windex). It works really well. Easy to spray on the bar or in the grip and it evaporates quickly but not as quickly as isopropyl alcohol. Plus I think it has a surfactant which makes things slide a bit easier. And you may be likely to have some around. Usually works to take ...


2

Two parts to this question - how to ease off an old grip that you may want to reuse (ie cutting it off is too destructive. Followed by how to fit the new one. I use a thin old electrician's flathead screwdriver to gently lever the edge off the grip up, then tilt the bike so that it leans to the side I'm working on, and then squirt a splash of water and ...


2

Besides grips and handle sweep (affecting wrist angle), you might want to consider bike fit (esp. seat fore-aft position, handlebar height, and length of stem) which greatly affect how much weight you put on your hands. Generally speaking, seat further back, handlebars higher, and stem shorter will have you putting less weight on your hands. However, beware,...


2

You have flat bars, so your hand positions are limited. Simply moving your hands a bit now and again will help. Try rotating at the wrists a little, so pressure moves from your thumb ball to the outside and vise versa. Decreasing the overall pressure on your hands is going to help. Try pressing a bit harder on the pedals to take some weight off your ...


2

I believe the 30 and 33mm sizes are the "outside" diameter of the grips (the diameter where your hands are actually grabbing) made to match either small or large hands (or just personal preference). The inside diameter should still be 22.2.


2

Gloves ought to do the trick, but if want a solution where you don't wear gloves, you could use sugru, the "moldable glue" to make the shifter more ergonomic: https://sugru.com/about


2

Soak the pads in gasoline then light them on fire. Don't laugh, I've done it and it worked. Be prepared both to 1. safely extinguish the fire (can't use water!) and 2. throw out the pads if you ruin them. You need only a tiny bit of gasoline both to 1. burn off the contaminants, or 2. start a major fire. The fire will go out when the gasoline is consumed. ...


2

With good grips, your hands should stay pretty much planted in place. Since grips are relatively cheap (you can get a decent pair of lock-ons for $7). It is not recommended to "death grip" your handlebars when mountain biking as it increases the amount of shock that goes into your wrists, rather you should hold them with enough force that you are ...


1

Your only options are to replace them with a non cracked set, or to cover the crack with something else. Silicon does not glue very well. Personally I have used a 10cm section of 30mm heatshrink tubing, and used a hot air blower to contract the tube down on itself. This makes a grippy top-skin for a handgrip that was breaking down and going tacky. ...


1

I have the same issue and am going to try a remedy I came across online. Wrap a couple of those big, fast broccoli rubber bands around the shifter. Tape of any kind is a bad idea -- the adhesive sticks won't come off and trust me, do NOT use goo-gone to try to remove it. It'll melt the grip. I got mine reversed with quick action and it dried/hardened again, ...


1

How worn is your shifter? When new they should be grippy and tactile, but with age, sweat, ozone and UV the rubbery grip will break down just like the hoods on a brifter. I've successfully used electrical heatshrink to cover cheap MTB grips where the rubber has gone tacky or otherwise failing. Perhaps you can fit a short piece over your shifter then heat ...


1

I've had the same problem and the solution is to try to keep the forearm, wrist and top of hand in line. Bending the wrist causes the numbness for me. It is also helpful to keep your elbows slightly bent.


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