45

There are a number of problems in your situation, including the behaviour of the groups, which I will breakdown as the following: A group of 50 is excessively large and it sounds like they also did a poor job of passing. This is one of the primary problems of large groups, they are hard to move in unison and the club/organizer should have broken the group ...


35

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


31

A group riding together and cooperating will ride to a set speed, so you'll be surging if you exceed that speed for long. A simple wheel-magnet speedo and bike computer helps show this on your bars without being big or expensive. An ad-hoc group will ride with varying speeds depending on who's in the front and whether they are trying to make a break away ...


30

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


29

Don't create the situation in the first place. Every large event I've ever been on would either have the roads closed down, or send the riders out in waves so as not to create a situation where a car would have to pass so many cyclists at once. Obviously the guy in the car was in the wrong, but there are still things that can be done to prevent the ...


18

If your question is, "can wind resistance be reduced for everyone on a small circuit," then the answer is "yes, this is a well-known effect, and if the circuit is small enough even one rider is enough." It is well-known that riders on indoor velodromes create their own "draft" by circling the track. This effect is large when the number of riders is large (...


17

Who rides fixes? Roadies who have got bored with always being out the front? Maybe its someone wanting to make a statement to the "Freds" (look it up) in the group I once did a 160km ride where some guy on a MTB (with nobbiles, back in the mid 1990's steel, 26" etc) arrived home 00:04:35 behind the leading pack (About 4:10 hours). Some argued the only ...


15

Novices I've ridden with are surprised and pleased that I ride behind them. They set the pace I can watch what they're doing I can ride close (enough to talk) without being too close (i.e. without colliding) I can recommend which gear they change and when I keep car traffic off their tail (e.g. by my using arm-signals to the car to say "slow down" or "...


15

On a sunny day you can often see the shadows without moving your head, so long as the sun isn't in front of you or too high. I sometimes pick up wheel suckers when commuting and while my commuter bike have mirrors its possible to ride too close for the mirror, but the shadows on the road work well if it's a sunny day. The mirror itself is a solution, but ...


13

If you did nothing to impede the group passing you, you basically did nothing wrong, and the rider who said you should have pulled over was out of line. As you stayed to the right and had riders to your left, then the individuals in the group obviously could have passed you. Speeding up as a group tries to pass you is borderline bad behavior, it would ...


13

I'm not entirely sure about the relevant legislation. However, as the question contains "deutch" I'll give the situation for Germany plus an update about Switzerland. I'd expect a) the situation to be sufficiently similar across other European legislations for practical every-day use. Summary: IMHO everyone misbehaved: Car driver, OP, and in Germany also ...


11

For those who subscribe to the rules: "Rule 19: Introduce Yourself If you deem it appropriate to join a group of riders who are not part of an open group ride and who are not your mates, it is customary and courteous to announce your presence. Introduce yourself and ask if you may join the group. If you have been passed by a group, wait for an ...


10

The question, mainly, would be, do you feel there is a definite peer pressure around this things? There is undoubtably fashion in a lot of cycling, but there there is in everything. Peer pressure would depend on the group. or a definite selling interest from shops? Yes, but then, that's why they're there. have you ridden with no uniform on uniformed ...


10

I'm going to disagree with Frisbee and note that there are many cycling clubs which aren't race teams but are just a bunch of people riding together and supporting a community of cycling in the area. There are several things that you can get: Group ride organization (support for the rides, sometimes food, planning, etc.) Discounts at local bike shops and ...


10

There is a lot to unpack on group riding etiquette and waiting for slower riders. Some people ride for social reasons and some people ride mainly for fitness so it can be difficult to balance everyone's need in a large group. The system we use that I think works quite well is we tend to have about five groups of varying ability and we stagger these groups ...


10

Context about OP's ride: There was a climate demonstration in Switzerland and people organized to ride there in groups, over large distances. So it was very much like a critical mass, but as a one off thing, it appears the seasoned regulars were missing who usually make sure everyone stays safe. Blocking traffic wasn't the goal and even less of a welcomed ...


8

Your fees pay for the running of the club, and your return is that they exist to do some/all of: run bike races, on road or off road or track or whatever. bulk purchase and supply of standard consumables like tubes or gels (ie my local 4wd club organises tow-ropes made to length for 1/4 the retail cost and superior hand-made quality.) Advocacy - Raising ...


8

For context, I have been doing group rides for about 20 years now, raced at the cat 1/2 level for a good portion of that, and had a fixed gear obsession off and on for many years too. Riding fixed is an interesting challenge, but it is most certainly not an out and out advantage. The short of it is that your 55 kph fellow is likely a strong rider, who also ...


8

Depends on the ride culture and how familiar people are. When I go riding with a group, its generally with a decent variation in riding ability and familiarity in riding in a group. Also, not everyone is familiar with routes always. So, we often split into two groups: one fast, another slow. Slowing down the fast group is boring. The slow group motivate ...


8

I think the idea is that by waiting for you at the top, and letting you rejoin, they are already providing enough help for people who aren't as strong riders. Once you have rejoined the group and are on the flats, you can benefit from the slipstream and should be able to keep up with the group. If you are getting dropped on the flats, or are so tired when ...


8

When you're in font of the rider that you want to help, then the more aero you are, the less shelter you give. Riding in a low body position, head tucked and arms narrow makes it easier to ride at speed, but means that you aren't puching through the wind as much for the rider behind you. You'll want to sit as upright as possible, arms a little flared ...


7

I have seen various tow rope devices based on bungie cords used in multi-event team races[1], but I'd suggest those are even harder to learn than drafting. Having someone pull on the bike unexpectedly can cause all kinds of control problems. It's not something I'd recommend using with a novice. It's generally only used on long uphill slogs. A tow rope just ...


7

This sounds like it was a very casual interaction. There's nothing wrong with what you did, but it would have been more polite to say hi and ask if they minded you drafting them for a few minutes. Even in a casual situation like that, be careful not to interfere with their rotation or their pace. IE, if you're not going to take a turn at the front, drop ...


7

Engineer and fixed gear rider here, hello. My top speed on flat on fixed is 1 km/h less than on geared bike with similar wheels, and I'd explain that with my geared bike having lower handlebars. On level ground, a single speed bike, fixed or not, does not have any performance penalty compared to a geared bike. On the contrary, singlespeed has slightly less ...


7

One of the riders rather pointedly suggested I should have pulled off to let the group through. I don't know about your neck of the woods, but in the Canadian province where I live, we have a Motor Vehicle Act which calls almost every road (including alleys behind houses) "highway" and says that a "person operating a cycle on a highway has the same rights ...


7

How close do peloton riders typically and strategically follow each other's wheel/attack? At the higher levels of racing you are often try to tuck your wheel as close as you you can stand, usually within about 2 inches of the rider in front, depending on how much you trust the rider in front. If you know they are sketchy you will allow more room to ...


7

I'm both a cyclist and a motorist, so I know this situation from both sides, I suppose. In my experience, these situations can be avoided, if people are willing to be reasonable - once you move into the legalities of the matter, you have in effect lost the more important perspective, namely that all road users should be able to go about their lawful business ...


6

Your family or significant other will only give you a few hours leave(like Annual leave) from home to go out riding.


6

Keeping it general - if you're interested and keen on cycling for health or fitness, or you have a competitive streak, then joining a club is a good idea at any age, and at any skill level. We can't speak for specifics of the clubs in your local region. Most clubs quieten down in the winter/off months, more so at Northerly and Southerly latitudes. Or they ...


6

A bike mirror allows you to see what's behind you while you're facing ahead. If you're concerned with the width of your bike during group rides, you can opt for a helmet or frame-mounted mirror rather than a handle-mounted mirror.


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