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4

Note for reader: "fat" in this context refers to having abnormally wide tires on the bicycle for riding in snow and sand and has nothing to do with the rider's physique. Handlebar widths in excess of 700mm are nothing unusual on modern off-road bicycles. Heck, even the most budget-friendly hardtails (usually with older or more traditional design) ...


4

I don't own wide bars, but on some bikes I ride, a narrower hand position feels faster and is also good for a headwind. Downside it is more upper-arm required to steer in a narrow hand position, so you're putting more effort in to manoever. Thus its good for long straights. Conversely a wider position is better when you're tired, or going fast, or need ...


1

When installing replacement grips I have used tape on the metal before adding the plastic. Just normal sticky tape or electric repairs sticky tape, with the sticky side to the metal. This does increase the size of the handle bars and gives a bit of grip for the plastic of the grip. (This was a cheap bike and cheap replacement parts, so not looking for the '...


1

You can pull the grip off, and lightly roughen the part of bars on the inside using a file or sandpaper. This gives some "tooth" for adhesive, because the straight chrome is smooth. New grips are probably your best option. I use dishwash liquid as a lubricant when installing them, and it dries to a tacky surface that will hold the grip in place. ...


9

If you remove the handle and spray a bit of hairspray into the handle and then put it back on, then it should help it to stick. Hairspray works well because it will stick a little while still allowing it to be removed when you need to replace it later. Alternatively, if this doesn't work, you may consider replacing the grips. They do degrade over time, ...


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