17

If you carry a multi-tool which happens to include a chain tool, you could also convert your bike to a single speed. If you do so, you would have to replace the chain afterwards as well (since you shorten it) but in some situations it could get you out of a rural area. If you do so, carefully select the gear you would put it in, as you won't be able to ...


12

Another suggestion: Scooter it. The bike is functional but the drive train cannot transmit power. So one solution is to scooter along with one foot on the opposite pedal, and your other foot pushing directly on the ground. This can be uncomfortable, so rotating your saddle ~30 degrees to the opposite side from where you're standing can give your hip ...


6

I used to get snakebites like crazy doing urban riding, even running really high pressures. I'm a big guy. What finally helped was running higher volume tires and wider. See if you can fit a wider tire in your frame, and look at getting some wider rims. Increasing the volume of air adds more cushioning. As Batman mentioned, going tubeless also helps, since ...


6

Circa 2000 a Blast had 80mm travel and 26" wheels on 1.90" tires, compared to a modern Blast -27.5" wheels, 100mm travel, on 2.25" tires. The crown height on the modern Blast is significantly higher than its ancestors, necessarily raising the top tube height at the front. The seat tube with modern geometry has been shortened. Among other things such as ...


5

Don't just lean forward... move forward such that you are sitting on the pointy nose of your seat... that's right position it so it feels like you are about to have your rear impaled. It requires leaning forward but it also lowers and shifts forward your center of mass. Here is where I get all nerdy. Imagine an ellipse whose ends are defined by the front ...


5

Here's the actual climb in question, according to OP. So if you are out of the saddle, clipped into pedals, and have your hips to the stem and are bending forward at the waist, then there's little more you can do to balance the bike. Consider not wearing a backpack. You might be able to vary your track on the path by zigzagging, or taking a slightly less ...


4

The current trend with mountain bikes is that consumers are beginning to see having the ability to run droppers in the 175-185mm range as the baseline and a required feature, not an extreme. Seat tubes are getting shorter and top tubes are getting more sloped to make this possible. Another side to it or way of thinking about it is that everyone wants to buy ...


4

It's the freehub rachet mechanism in the hub that makes a rapid repeated clicking sound when you stop pedaling. The cassette is not involved as it slides on the splined freehub body and has no moving parts. (Older technology freewheels combined the sprockets and rachet mechanism on on unit though.) Silent or quieter hubs are usually considered an upgrade. ...


4

I hope that your derailleur hanger was a separate part and not integral to the frame. Some options: If you do have a separate derailleur hanger you can carry a spare. If the hanger gets broken install the spare. You will need more tools than a few hex wrenches to do that, maybe pliers to hold the broken hanger while you unscrew the derailleur bolt. Of ...


3

Cage length is part of the derailleur design that determines it's total capacity - the ability to take up chain slack when shifting onto small sprockets or chainrings. If you look at the Shimano rear derailleur specs page you will see that the the 'GS' medium cage models have a higher total capacity than the 'SGS' long cage models. Long cage models are ...


3

You have a few options: 1) Run a higher pressure 2) Go tubeless 3) Don't ride on stairs 4) Work on your technique; depending on how the tire hits the stair (and size of the stair), you're more likely to pinch flat (e.g. on the edges). 5) run bigger tires


2

I think its the steep turn that is stuffing you up more than the grade alone. Consider this instead, go around and out along the ridge. Then turn around on the slight crest, and nail it in a straight line back up the ridge-line. If you get out of the saddle I bet you won't have a problem.


2

More than likely - The occasional small jump won't hurt the Talon, but landing big jumps will require perfection (Those forks will make surviving a bad landing next to impossible). We would need to know what the trails were, and how difficult they are, but if they have 'easy' trails that have chicken lines around anything that cannot be rolled over, the ...


2

I've googled and found this bike on Amazon. Its also listed at a UK site. Second site lists this at £160 so its firmly in low-spec price range. Most likely the front fork is based on elastomer and/or a coil spring. Some questions that discuss the internals of a fork: What options do I have when replacing my fork's elastomers? and this question ...


2

Instead of rebuilding a new hub to your rim, it will probably be most cost effective to get a new rear wheel with one of the louder freehubs or you could even go for a complete set of wheels so the front & rear wheels have the same spokes & rims. BUT, Shimano XT hubs are excellent and yes Shimano is noted for making quiet freehubs. I have wheels ...


2

As Argenti Apparatus already mentioned, the sound comes from the hub. There are various kinds of springs and ratchets in different hubs. You can use this Youtube playlist with hub sound checks as a guide when selecting your hub. The videos also contain explanation commentary for the features of the sounds. For example:


1

If the steerer is threadless then you’re looking for a 1.125 inch or 1-1/8 inch , or 28.6mm straight steerer (all the same thing). You also need to match the wheel axle type e.g 9mm Quick Release (most likely) or 15mm x 100 thru axle (less likely). Lastly you want to match the travel within +/- 20mm. So if your current one is 100mm travel you don’t want to ...


1

if your tires say '26 × 1.79' the you have '26 inch' wheels also know as ISO/ETRTO 599, i.e. the rim diameter is 599mm. the '1.79' is the nominal width of the tire in inches. Mountain bikes all used to have this size wheel until '29 inch' appeared (ISO/ETRTO 622) and then the compromise '27.5 inch' (ISO/ETRTO 584) - hence the options you see on the website....


1

Yeah a light trail is fine, but nothing that's too hard. Giant builds some good bikes, but as you know, using a hardtail on a tough DH is like using roller blades skates for ice hockey. They have the same basic concept, and they both do the same thing, but on different surfaces. If its a light trail with small features, it should hold up well. If you're ...


1

Got one like it says xtc on frame after the Giant name. Come as far as it might be an SE model. Frame does match Giants Uk catalogue from Ca 2005 to ca "2008 maybe even newer.


1

I've looked through a few models for various years at http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/Bikes.aspx?year=2004&Brand=Giant The chainstays on yours don't get narrower towards the rear, suggesting lower-end, but it's not a Boulder, because I can't find a Boulder with a downtube gusset. Disc-only points towards late 2000s mid-range. Giant's graphics ...


1

As well as the suggestions already mentioned there is one tip that may help - when you are on a steep climb you will almost certainly be pulling on the bars - if you are pulling up on the bars then it will obviously encourage the front wheel to lift. Instead, think about trying to pull backwards on your bars - so imagine that you're trying to pull them ...


1

I don't have a section that steep but I have a front wheel lifting problem on the last part of my commute since I have a lot of weight in the back pannier. No amount of leaning forwards stopped it when I'm fully loaded. So I drape a toolbelt over the handle bars which makes a big difference. The toolbelt weighs around 7 kg.


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