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11

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


4

I have found before that if you decide to do the quick release up tighter than usual it can tighten up the bearings a little too much and you might hear a fairly regular noise as the wheel rotates. I'm not sure I would call it a 'scratching' noise, but maybe that's it. Try a looser quick release adjustment. If the noise remains the same then you can rule ...


3

So1es basically don't work and always have problems. If you already possessed the means to service them, the pads were functional, and you were only going to be down fluid and time after they still don't work, I would say you should probably rethink your valuation of your time unless you want to experience for yourself how bad they are for whatever reason, ...


3

Probably air in the lines. Assuming that's the case, yes, worth repairing. You'll need to bleed the brakes. To do that, you'll need the appropriate bleed kit. Probably $20 or so. Here's the service doc. Do not use the wrong kind of brake fluid, as that can damage the seals.


3

I'm looking at the Hayes manual https://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/45-20182J_Mech-Brake-Install.pdf for "how to mount caliper to fork". Oddly, it doesn't seem to specify how the pad offsets should be set, so that may explain why you have ended up with the outer pad all the way out. I suggest this: Wind inner and out all the way out. ...


3

Your problem may be that you're misunderstanding mechanical disc brakes. On most, only the outside pad moves, the disc is bent onto the inside pad. This means the loosen, clamp and tighten method doesn't work. You can do it by eye, or use a spacer between the inside pad and disk when you tighten it up. Hayes install instructions are here.


2

Before you do anything else, confirm that the axle is properly seated in the dropouts. Unless the dropouts are resting solidly on the axle on both sides the wheel will be slightly cocked and it is likely that the disc will drag. Working on a bike stand it is particularly challenging to get the wheel properly into place – you need about three hands to hold ...


2

Ring the bike shop before doing anything. They may prefer you take it back to them rather than try to fix it yourself. All it probably needs a calliper alignment. Briefly - Loosen the two bolts holding the calliper so its free to move but is not sloppy. Slowly bring the brakes on while spinning the wheel. Once the brakes are on tight, without releasing ...


2

If the sound is occurring once per revolution it must be related to the disc being at least slightly out of true. With the bike off the ground rotate the wheel and look at the disc in the caliper. Check to see if it's touching the pads at any point. You may need to re-adjust the caliper position. I'd be suspicious of a bit of grit or metal stuck in the in ...


1

I've had a similar experience where I thought it was something to do with my rotor, or dirt in my system. Took it all apart for cleaning & adjusted many times to try and sort it with no luck. Turned out my problem was actually a tiny amount of flex in my QR skewer. Being a reasonably sized guy, in the down stroke during pedaling I caused just enough ...


1

You would not need to change the rotors as they are both 160mm rotors but both are compatible if you want to change them.


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