63

No. You should always ride with a white light facing forward and a red light facing backwards. If you want additional illumination, you can add multiple white/red lights in the appropriate direction. Amber/yellow lights can be used facing any direction for additional visibility. The first reason is that it's the law: (a) Every bicycle when in use during ...


32

Wood et al. (2009): Drivers’ and cyclists’ experiences of sharing the road: incidents, attitudes and perceptions of visibility. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 41 (4), pp. 772-776 About differences in the visibility as perceived by bikers and drivers: The largest difference relates to the visibility of cyclists using lights on their bicycles, where ...


27

Take the lights and anything else thats likely to be stolen off your bike. For things that can't be removed easily, you may want to use something like Pitlock security skewers (or security bolts) or glue in ball bearings or similar into the head of the bolts (which will make them hard to remove when you need to remove them, but a casual thief can't remove ...


17

I found something on the homepage of the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. They have an article about bicycle helmet lights, listing the pros and cons of them: Summary: Lights on bicycle helmets can be useful, but must have a breakaway mount. Especially about the breakaway mount: The importance of breakaway mounts The first and most important rule ...


16

In terms of accessories like lights, GPS, etc. the only way to be safe is to remove them entirely. Remember that if something is quick-releasable for you, it's also quick-releasable for thieves. Bike lights will frequently get stolen even if they aren't easily removable, because they're valuable. There is an assortment of "anti-theft" bike accessories ...


13

OK so I do a lot of bike light reviews. I originally started writing them for this very site's community blog, and now I run a separate website called The Bike Light Database. Has anyone used one? I can't seem to find a review of the dang thing on youtube, as popular as they are supposed to be! I've reviewed this light specifically, and can say that ...


12

I have actually dramatically improved the cutoff on my 1200 lumen dual LED (just for reference) with a sort of brim made out of aluminium plate. On road I run it on minimum brightness (guessing about 1/4 -- 1/3 power). On pitch dark bike paths I do change the angle a little as well as turning up the brightness. Super-speedy sketch (go inkscape!): The ...


11

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


10

Car headlights are more complex than bike lights. The beam is 'shaped' to throw light away from oncoming drivers and has a sharp cutoff on dipped beam. therefore bike lights will always cause a greater degree of glare (for relative brightness) than car lights. Point the beam so its shining at the ground about 10-20meters in front, and slightly towards the ...


9

I don't believe these are "better" or "worse" than other lights, rather they are a supplement to other lighting systems. I think the inventors' claims about forward and rear illumination are somewhat questionable as it won't compare to a real head/taillight of similar cost. However, I think they would provide some improvements in side and off-angle ...


9

Helmet lights are good. Usually in addition to one on the handlebars. The pro of the helmet light is that you can light up things that are not directly infront of you. The pro of having an additional light is that it increases the chance of being seen and adds extra illumination for you. The con is that if you are looking to the side and a car is ...


9

In Germany, all bicycle lights above a certain lumen value have to have a low beam feature, so it's pretty standard here. So, if you do not want to kludge your existing headlight get a german one, e.G. Busch und Mueller Headlights always have a low beam feature, which they especially advertise. Here is their english web page. http://en.bumm.de/


9

As already suggested by @Batman, have a look at this Bike Light Database write up. What to look for ... LED - with cheap lights don't believe the claimed Lumen, Look at the LED specification - a CREE XL-M T6 or U2 are probably the one you want. There's not much difference in them, you typically get about real 600 Lumen out of the cheap lights, more ...


8

i have been using the Supernova e3 Triple for night-time singletrack missions for the past two winters.....all I can say is awesome, completely awesome. 870 Lumens. bright. I used a Shimano Alfine dynamo hub and built a complete 'night wheel' with a DT 4.2d rim, it has rubber and a rotor mounted so swap-over time is very quick. We have months of mud, ice ...


8

Sellers on Amazon.com have a lot of leeway in the naming of their products and advertising script they use. In that sense, Amazon is becoming more and more like ebay. Rather than the feedback (or lack thereof), the technical specs of the light should be warning you to stay away. Powered by only 3xAAAs, there's no way this light is getting more than a few ...


8

You can get lights that are powered by a dynamo (generator) in the front hub. Combined with bright LED front and rear lights you get excellent visibility (both seeing and being seen) and very little maintenance. The downside is that the equipment is not inexpensive – figure you'll need to spend at least $250 US for a front wheel, headlight and taillight. My ...


8

Fortified Bike sells bike lights that are designed to be theft resistant. They're made of heavy aluminum and use security screws so most thieves won't have the proper tool to unscrew it. The also sell a security seatpost clamp to help keep thieves from stealing the light by stealing your seat. I haven't used their newer rechargeable lights, but I've had ...


8

I run a bike light testing and review site called The Bike Light Database which started as a series of blog posts for the Bicycles Stack Exchange community blog. I've personally tested dozens of lights, and have read lots of info online about countless more. I also speak with lighting companies regularly, have visited a bike light factory in person, and have ...


8

Just the color. The products are identical. Light & Motion lists their different color variations as separate "products", probably due to some limitation of their store site engine. Note that there is an Urban 800 Fast Charge version, which in addition to coming in different colors, actually is a different product physically.


8

You would be entering in a very busy market with no obvious advantages. Let's look at the two types of LEDs that you might use: If you're using inexpensive and low-power 5050 LEDs (15 lumens@350mW; usually ganged in groups), then you could power the lights off button cells (two CR2032s would power one 5050 LED for about 3 hours; 3 x 5050s for one hour) but ...


7

What the code is saying is that your headlight has to be visible on the sides. That's why most modern bicycle headlights have those little clear plastic channels on the side for the light to seep through and be seen from the side. ( The idea isn't to blind people GordonM ) Maybe it really reaches 300 feet, maybe it doesn't, the traffic police probably aren'...


7

Yes, with easy to spot 'caveats'... On 'Critical Mass' bike rides there are all kinds of imaginative lighting setups that give individual riders individuality. We like creativity in cycling and how everyone is different. Undoubtedly these lights are cool and would be fab on a Critical Mass ride. Therefore, for that reason 'yes'. Caveats... LED lights are ...


7

Something like this accessory is what you need: Can be fitted onto wired or meshed bicycle baskets. This specific model is made by the "Rixen & Kaul" and can be found in many online shops. E.g. Amazon - Rixen & Kaul Light-Clip Basket Fitting - Black.


7

You can't directly convert because you need the distance and beam angle. Lumen is a measure of output while lux is how much light is falling on an object. 5 lux is very dim indeed, less than a sliver of moonlight on a dark street. I should ask, though, are you sure it said lux and not lumens? If it's a single led run from AAA or CR2032 batteries, then you'...


6

Just a complement to Byron's answer. Blinking too fast would be counter-productive. For instance, a 20 Hz blinking could get fuzzied, and you would end up with the equivalent of a half-powered steady light. According to this NASA study (<blink>warning: not about traffic</blink>), the optimal frequency range for catching attention is 4-8 Hz (...


6

A blinking light is disturbing, even after you have been noticed, even from the opposite direction, it is hard to concentrate on something else. In Germany, these blinking lights are prohibited (StvZO §67 (4) 2.), and right so. Stop using them! Maybe you are safer, but the rest of the traffic is more unsafe. If everybody starts blinking and flashing, ...


6

There are various extension mounts you can buy or build to reposition lights and other handlebar-mount items. I have a purchased unit that can be adjusted maybe 2" higher than the bar, and which can mount on either the bar or the stem. You can also craft something with a short piece of plastic pipe, a few screws and brackets, and some cleverness.


6

The only helmets with built-in light mounts I know of are by Bell, which can mount the Blackburn Flea. I don't know if any of them are full-face. The Flea is pretty useless for offroad riding, it's too dim. Lights usually mount up with velcro straps through the vents. When I was racing my MTB after dark Ay-Ups were common - small, extremely bright, and a ...


6

Pretty much all bike-related lights for helmets are mounted with velcro straps. My mate was riding in full-face helmet with lights on helmet. He had vents on top of the helmet and mounted the lights through the vents. Worked just fine. We use Light and Motion for "battery in the pack, light on the head" set up. If you are planning a DH in the dark, I ...


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