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15

Using WD40 on a headset should not cause it to loosen. Something else is wrong. You need to find out what that is. First - don't ride the bicycle until the problem is identified and fixed. Doing so might be dangerous - both to you and anyone near, as you may lose control. If your bicycle has a new-style "threadless" headset, the stem bolts may be ...


13

Completely remove the bicycle quill Hang the bike up-side down Take out the wedge. If the wedge is stuck, try inserting the quill bolt alone (no quill, just bolt). Take care not to push the wedge further in. Try to thread in the wedge, and remove the wedge when there is enough grip. If wedge is truly stuck, remove the front wheel from the fork. The fork ...


12

Here's how I would fix the problem. This could all be done by somebody with basic tools and basic knowledge. Get a quill-threadless stem adapter and a new stem. This will allow you to fit the new stem to the handlebars without removing anything from the bars. The old stem can be removed destructively by removing the cinch bolt and prying the thing apart ...


12

That looks like the compression ring for a threadless headset. Images by keithonearth on Wikimedia Commons, reproduced under Gnu free documentation license More information found at Sheldon Brown


12

What you have is an adjustable stem. The headset is the pair of bearings in the head tube that the fork steerer tube runs in, that allows the handlebars and fork to turn. You are tightening the correct bolt, however, check that the nut on the other side is captive and not turning when you tighten the bolt. If it is not captive you need to hold the nut with ...


11

Here's an excerpt from Chris King about headset types: What is an “Integrated” headset? It is a bicycle frame, fork and bearing system designed to eliminate the humble headset cup. To integrate means to combine and hopefully to simplify. What has been “integrated” by the integrated headset? The bearings now rest inside the frame instead of inside ...


10

It is true that integrated headsets can wiggle a fraction of a millimeter when properly installed, more if they're not adjusted correctly. For most bikes, the wear caused by a properly adjusted integrated headset is going to be trivial. Something else on the frame will likely fail before the bore for the cartridge bearing gets wallowed out. Keep in mind that ...


10

@DWGKNZ was right, turned out that there was a 3mm hex at the bottom. Picture of the removed plug, upside down: Thanks for quick and useful advice.


10

Probably never -- headsets can easily last the life of a bicycle for most people without needing an overhaul. If you ride in the wet, it is advisable to have a front fender, though (to reduce the likelihood of needing an overhaul even further).


10

What you have now is a bit of a hack, but it could be good temporarily so long as you don't over-stress things somehow, and if you can tolerate the lower handlebar. (Note, I haven't seen how your stem is cracked and so can't tell how bad the situation is.) It's not likely to fail catastrophically (so long as you're not hot-dogging on the thing) but the ...


9

It is indeed a compression ring, David D’s diagram is helpful to illustrate the following: What it does is transfer the force of the cap bolt to the inner face of the cartridge bearing. That then compresses the ball bearings inside properly, as they need to be, which is why the split ring is called a compression ring. The angled face must fit into the ...


9

There are quite a few adjustable stems where you would NOT tighten the correct bolt. Also tightening this bold too hard can lead to a catastrophic failure of the stem. For quite a few of those adjusting stems the tightening bolt is underneath.


9

The grey part is a wedge and has a split in it. You could use a metal pick to pry it out at the split. If you deform it in your attempt, file or sand off any burrs before you reuse it. If you hit the top of the fork too hard it's possible to knock it out of round, even with a rubber mallet. The problem you have encountered is quite common and can be ...


9

Yes this is correct. Once the stem bolts are tight, they hold the system together. The top cap can be loosened without releasing the preload. You could try it out and you should find that the stem remains fixed and no play will develop. You'll still need the top cap next time you want to preload the headset, so perhaps not redundant... maybe furloughed is a ...


8

I would get a fork with a steerer that fits the frame. The expense and risk of modifying your existing fork won't be worth it. There were some mountain bike forks with replacement steerer tubes but they didn't allow for changes of size or type of steerer. They were 1 1/8" threadless and so was the replacement. You also want to match the fork rake/angle that ...


8

I'm going to recommend that you NOT do this. There were in the past manufacturers of 1" steerer suspension forks - though I'm not certain that they're are still sold. It is important to note that bicycle frames built to accept solid steel forks have different geometry than those built for suspension forks. The frame is designed for a fork that doesn't have ...


8

The product you are looking for is called "headtube adaptor" or "headset reducer". Once you know the name, you should be able to find them online. If the headset is in good shape, there should be no reason to replace it. Rebuild usually refers to cleaning, greasing and adjustment, and possibly replacing bearing balls.


8

In practical terms, it's impossible to tell for sure in a case like this. It's probably fine, but there's no way of knowing absolutely via visual inspection. The surface indentations from the stem windows do occur naturally even with consistently correct torque on the fasteners. They're pretty normal to see. It would be a good idea to get it as clean as ...


8

Common threadless steel steerers have essentially no practical limit for this in either 1" or 1-1/8". There of course is a theoretical limit, but it's going to be a very large number, way over 12"/300mm. There have been a few companies over the years to make thinwall fancy alloy steel steerers (Alpha Q/Reynolds was a fairly popular one) that do have limits, ...


8

As noted, the cap is theoretically not needed to hold the stem in place, but in the rare situation you need a stem adjustment on the road/trail you'd have a hard time of it. I've removed a spacer above the stem to be used on a different bike after tightening the stem bolts and never had a problem riding on singletrack. But I put the cap back on, for the ...


7

The bottom ring is used to provide tension against the bearings to stop the headset from wobbling around. It only needs to be hand tight, hence no spanner/tool attachments. The middle and top ring are tightened against each other, as a lock ring to prevent the bottom ring from loosening. The top ring can be tightened with any spanner of the right size. ...


7

Most likely you are describing a spacer, but it is not clear. The spacers should not spin. If they do, it's a sign that the bearings have little or no pre-load and the head set will be loose. Couple possible causes The pinch bolts were not loose when the top cap was tightened. You are missing a spacer. If you want to lower the bar, you move a spacer from ...


7

The CAAD 12 uses sealed cartridge bearings which are replaceable and not proprietary. You shouldn't need many special tools to service the headset bearings, especially if they are new - you should be able to tap them out and remove the necessary parts with a screwdriver or wedge. However, if you are asking the question because you are concerned with home ...


7

The corrosion can be removed from the steerer with no problems. If the corrosion was bad and extended into where the top headset bearing sits, there might be a problem as the steerer would not fit into the inner bearing race properly. I can see that is not the case here. (Interestingly you can see where the stem and spacers are positioned on the steerer ...


7

Yes, the piece in the lower left is the crown race. Split types (with the slit) should gently pinch onto the crown race seat of the fork. What's important with that type is that there's zero play (slop or free movement) between the race and the fork. It will be able to turn but shouldn't be able to just spin freely. If there is play or free spinning, you ...


7

30.03mm is a measurement one might expect to get off the OD of a 1" JIS cup (called EC29 in SHIS, from the 29.8mm frame bore). That's consistent with the "22.2/30.0/26.4" on the label. However, 26.4 is the ID of a typical crown race from a 1" ISO/Campy/Professional headset, aka EC30. You are in possession of a mixed standards headset. These have always ...


7

I went ahead with the rotary tool (Dremel) and general cutting disc. I cut two grooves side by side in the top spacer and prized one of them open with a flat screwdriver. Once the aluminium is thin enough, it will snap open with a little click, so it isn't necessary to cut all the way through. I carefully cut a little deeper each pass and tested with the ...


7

Yes ZS56/40 - Zero stack with 56 mm bore diameter and 40 mm fork crown race. It is zero stack because it is a black cup containing the silver bearing, but the bearing ends up inside the frame tube (i.e. not external). The 56.10 mm dimension gives a snug interference fit with a 56 mm head tube ( bore diameter). The 39.95 or so is about the 40 mm dimension ...


6

For a road bike the quill / threadless adapter size it is almost certain to be 22.2 mm (0.874"). When people talk about a 1" steering tube 1" is the OD, the ID which is the actual size of the stem is usually 22.2 mm. The description of the adapter will call it a 1" to 1 1/8" or a 22.2 mm to 28.6 mm adapter. When you install it you don't need the spacers ...


6

It sounds as through you loosened the compression nut inside your carbon steer tube, which you should not have done. That bolt (the 5mm inside) should be tightened once during installation and is not touched for a headset adjustment (or than to perhaps check it is still tight). When you loosened that bolt, you made it so that the top cap will simply pull ...


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