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95

"Optimal" cadence varies with what you're trying to optimze, so your question doesn't have a simple answer. Freely-chosen Cadence vs. a Targeted Cadence A recent review by Hansen et al. summarizes what is currently known about factors affecting choice of cadence. In particular, they conclude "[d]uring high-intensity cycling, close to the maximal aerobic ...


58

As far as I can tell, no. I've been riding 30 minutes or more every workday before breakfast for more than 10 years with no detectable ill effects. When I was riding an hour to work I'd sometimes have a small snack before riding, but only rarely. When I'm cycle touring I'll often ride for an hour before I have breakfast, as that wakes me up and gets me warm, ...


28

This would have to be one of the most opinion-based questions we could possibly have, and one of the most important to deal with in a sensible manner. Firstly, it must be said that what is safe depends on the woman's own behavioral history, and the state of the pregnancy. She certainly should not be taking up new active sports. Some competitive sports ban ...


27

This is not an either-or proposition. Your bike is hitting the bumps and supporting your full weight (minus the very small proportion of weight that might be falling at that exact moment) regardless of how you stand when you hit the bumps. The difference is whether you're going to let the additional damping effects of the down tube, seat tube, bottom ...


26

This happens to runners more than bikers but is the same thing you describe... friction. I've done band-aids, tape and even special products (Nipguards) made for covering just the nipple area but the best remedy I've found is compression clothing. Even in the middle of summer, I will wear some skin tight Under Armour shirt. Heat Gear (odd naming, but ...


24

It sounds like you over-exerted yourself and "bonked" – your body ran out of sugar so you fainted. In that case, you reduce the risk by eating more while you ride* and by listening to your body more and backing off when it's getting too much. It may also be blood-pressure related: people with low blood pressure are (as I understand it) more ...


21

If I see a significant bump coming (on my touring bike -- no suspension), or just a stretch of fairly rough pavement, I'll generally raise my bum a few inches off the seat and flex my arms, so that my legs and arms are the "springs". This in not only more pleasant than taking the hard bumps, it also helps the bike maintain contact with the road, reducing ...


20

I am a physician (not practicing anymore), a biker, and an office worker. And I ride fixie. And I sometimes have knee discomfort. So, my few cents: Depending on HOW YOU SIT DURING WORK, specially how you rest your legs/feet, your knee might be twisted for a long time (hours a day). Watch yourself if it is happening or not. Take a rest on the fixie. I ...


19

You cannot outride (or outrun or out-any-other-exercise) a bad diet. On top of that, decades of research shows it's impossible to "spot-reduce". Your options are: Eat some combination of food that results in fewer calories in. Shoot for somewhere between 200-500 fewer calories for moderate weight loss. Ride some combination of harder and longer while ...


19

The myosin heads of muscle fibres move using the energy produced by converting ATP to ADP. The energy extracted is about 30.5 kJ/mol of ATP. Muscle tissue has limited ATP storage. Your muscles' primary fuel storage is local Glycogen. Converting Glucose to ATP Glycogen is converted to Glucose. Glycolysis, the Citric Acid Cycle (aka TCA Cycle, Krebs Cycle) ...


18

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


17

First off, unless you aspire to be a professional racer (or at least a highly competitive amateur) ignore the advice that you "must turn at least 90 rpm" or whatever. Secondly, even if you DO have such aspirations, you're not going to do well by trying to achieve a high cadence right from the start -- it's something that you must develop slowly. With ...


16

The simplest advice is: just keep it up. Give your body time to adapt to the new workload you're putting on it, and it will get easier and easier. For drinks, you can buy gatorade powder and mix it yourself at home. $19.49 for 9 gallons of gatorade is way better than paying retail price for a quart at a time. As I understand carb loading, it's not ...


16

Unlike riding horses, there are no body movements that are dangerous for pregnant cyclists in any stage of pregnancy when riding on roads. Mountain cycling is not as safe and I would certainly talk that over with a Dr or midwife. The risks are mostly the same as any other road user in your area. How do car behave around cyclists and how safe are the roads ...


14

I worked as a physician (not anymore nowadays, got into medical systems design), and I can guarantee you that either people and health professinals overemphasize the importance of the weight as if it was a single "magic number" regarding health, and it is not. Body fat percentage, cardiovascular endurance, muscle and joint flexibility, dietary habits and ...


14

Standing to pedal won't damage your knees. Supporting and propelling you when you are standing is exactly what knees are designed to do. If anything standing is better for your knees than sitting. When you are sitting down their motion is limited because the top and bottoms of your legs are 'fixed' in position. When you stand your knees and hips can move ...


14

Long term benefits ... Hmmm ... does 55 years count as long term? If so, I think I and a few others here qualify ... Key benefits Cycling is a life-long form of exercise. One of the group I meet for coffee is 82, another is 80. A bunch are in their sixties and seventies, and another bunch are in their fifties. About a quarter are women. Another bunch I ...


14

This would be a great problem to have for most of us roadies. Simply eat more if you find yourself losing more weight than you care to lose. You can alternatively balance with more strength based exercises like lifts, pulls, rows at the gym or elsewhere. Or cake.


13

Clothing is a good choice for sun block while cycling. Unlike walking or standing still, there's always a breeze as long as you are pedaling which increases comfort. Long sleeves and long pants may be comfortable on a bike in hot weather even when they are uncomfortable indoors or walking outdoors. Pros for Sunscreen as sun protection while biking It's ...


13

The purpose of the channel in a bike saddle is to reduce pressure to the perineum, which can cause numbness and other long-term problems. This is a matter of both comfort and health, although not everyone is affected. Individual body type, saddle design, bike fit, and riding style work together to make saddle fit a very personal issue. On a related note, ...


13

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


13

Here in the UK on BBC TV last night was a program 'Trust me I'm a Doctor' in which they examined the effect of exercise in men and women and whether to eat before exercising or after. On average most men (having more muscle) burnt more carbohydrates from their body stores so are better eating after exercise. Most women (tending to have more fat in their ...


12

Talk to a doctor The symptoms of waking up with tingly fingers make this sound consistent with carpal tunnel syndrome to my non-doctor opinion. Basically, as I understand it, a little bit of that now and then isn't a problem, but too much over time causes damage which can be permanent and cause some major hand problems. There's a bundle of nerves and ...


12

I have had this problem when running (it's known as jogger's nipple). It's caused by friction when your top rubs against your nipples, moisture from sweat (or rain) tends to make it worse. Wearing technical clothing that draws moisture away from your skin will help, along with some kind of barrier cream. Personally, I use bodyglide as I find it easy to ...


10

A couple of potential quick fixes: Slow Down A Little If you cycle a bit slower (5-10%) you should find that takes a lot less out of you and it will only add a few minutes to your commute. Take The Bus One Day A Week If you exercise 5 days in a row you're going to feel tired, particularly on the 4th and 5th days. If you work Monday to Friday then try ...


10

Since it's on the inside of your thighs, it's a good bet that our seat is too wide, or not properly adjusted. A chamois crème will help, but I think the saddle change is a better idea.


10

Depends on exercise intensity. In a day or two you can return to your normal/moderate exercise. A complete recovery of oxygen delivery can take as much as 3/4 weeks. This means a professional athlete should be careful because he will loose performance, but us normal human beings can carry our normal daily lives. You can read more complete answerers given ...


10

You are correct - keeping the bike in the appropriate gear is important. Generally, you should have a preferred pedaling rpm, or cadence that you try to keep constant. Change to lower gears on uphill gradients, higher gears on downhill gradients. If you find yourself going downhill at a speed that even your highest gear makes you pedal too fast, feel free ...


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