17

I have seen this effect with several different optical based wrist HRM's. Your HR is not 90, but likely closer to 180. Optical HRM's generally have a longer lag to track changes in the heart rate and sudden jumps can be interpreted by the software as drops rather than increases. I've found that for long sustained efforts, the HRM eventually tracks back to ...


11

You can tell when you are knackered. Power indicates your actual output. With a baseline of previous power and HR data, you can establish a model for what you should be able to do. When your numbers start to fall way outside your model/baseline (you normally produce 250W at 80% of your max heartrate, but now you are only producing 200W at 85% or 90% of ...


11

There is only one occasion I would consider use of HRM has priority over a power meter (or indeed no monitor at all and simply using perceived exertion), i.e. your doctor or cardiologist has specifically requested you not exceed a certain HR. Otherwise there is no time that, if you have a power meter available, using an HRM trumps using a power meter. One ...


8

The 220 - age (or any age based formula) is a myth that works well enough for roughly 60% of the population and puts the other 40% wrong. That it persists to this day with such ready access to HR monitors and reasonably accurate sub-maximal tests to determine max HR astounds me. (I blew over 210 when I was in my early 30's and now over 50 can sustain 170 ...


7

A heart rate monitor (HRM) measures cardiovascular system effort, while power measures muscular system effort. When averaged over long periods of time the two are typically highly correlated, they can also diverge depending on the circumstances, for example in a sprint your HR will lag behind your effort or your HR for a given power effort can vary by ...


7

This is absolutely specific on the heart rate zones of each individual. Each person has a different heart rate at their functional threshold (FTHR). Professional cyclists are able to cycle for a long time (most of the road race) almost at their functional threshold but the actual heart rate is completely individual. Even the percentage of the functional ...


6

Just keep at it. The human body is very adaptable and you'll soon get fitter. Don't worry too much about food and nutrition at the moment, that only matters when you're cycling at a competitive level, you just need to make sure you've had breakfast before you ride in the morning. Regardless of cycling/weight loss you should try and eat a healthy balanced ...


6

I would claim, without data so just thinking about my experience with the world, that most commuters are not targeting heart rate or power, they are just trying to get to work. Some want to get there as fast as they are (reasonably) capable of and some are wanting to get there at a reasonable pace that does not require a shower. Many just want to get there. ...


5

Source - Metabolic Factors Limiting Performance in Marathon Runners (While the above paper is aimed at marathon runners, I'm not aware of any reason it can't be applied to other endurance sports such as long-distance cycling.) Exercise is fuelled by a combination of fat (plasma free fatty acids plus muscle triglycerides) and carbohydrate (plasma glucose ...


5

Learning to listen to your body equates to developing discipline in your training. Changing the type of exercise can help you give specific muscle groups rest but you can still exercising without the discipline to meter your effort and therefore not actually rest. My suggestion is to write out your exercise plan and journal how you do. The aim of the plan ...


5

Because it does not work. First: As discussed in comments, the assumption that maximum aerobic heart rate can be calculated as 180 - age is wrong and heart rate is not very good indicator of power output. Second: Training only at low intensity does not develop speed or endurance. All research that I have read concludes that for non-athletes the largest ...


5

I'll offer a few observations from personal experience. Firstly, I have a Fitbit Alta HR which also has an optical HR sensor. I find it's pretty accurate running, but fails abysmally on a bike. It tends to synchronize to my pedaling cadence, rather than my heart. All optical HR sensors have heuristics to compensate for motion, and this means they may be ...


5

Max HR isn't a particularly useful metric. Not only is it particularly difficult to measure/estimate, but it can't be used to accurately define training zones, as there are large variations between individuals with regards to % of MHR they can sustain for various durations. It can even change for an individual based on their current state of training. Basing ...


4

For those unfamiliar with the CTS system, there is a guide here The answer is a hard one without knowing the individual athlete, as a better trained athlete will be able to tolerate much more work in the tempo and sweet spot ranges. On race day HR is often a few beats higher and you can squeeze out that bit more due to a combination of adrenaline and ...


4

Firstly, it should be said that every reputable source recommends obtaining max HR under medical supervision only, due to inherent risks. That is why many sites discuss various ways of estimating max HR. From my understanding of the literature (sorry, no references to hand, I hope to add some later in the weekend), the max HR obtained from different sports ...


4

I think you need more rest. It's easy to forget that you don't get fitter and stronger during exercise, but when your body recovers after exercise. I admire your motivation and the effort you're putting in, if you don't get enough rest in between exercise, it may actually take longer to get fit (and be more painful). By rest I mean whatever ordinary daily ...


4

The short annswer is not at all important. People trained and got fit for decades without heart rate monitors. Current thoughs in some camps is to dump heart rate altogether. For someone just wanting to get fit and loose some weight, heartrate monitoring is usually an interesting distraction. The drive for it comes down from pro level sports to trainers and ...


4

GPS-based computers, which are often called head units, typically use two communication protocols: Bluetooth (which is the same as many personal electronic devices like smartphones use) and ANT+, which is a protocol developed for the cycling world. I think that ANT+ was initially developed for power meters, but it can be used for other devices. ...


3

Having considered between unsing my android phone as a bike computer and buying dedicated computer, I noticed some points that could serve you. Using cell phone: You need a bike mount to be able to look at the data while you ride, moreso for navigation, and they are somehow bulky, just like a cell phone compared to the dedicated bike gps you mention. Cell ...


3

It is not ANT+ - only the HR-11 is listed on "thisisant.com" (and its too old to be ANT+) I suspect it will analogue - most likely would be Polar compatible but cannot be certain. There are Cateye digital monitors, and also ANT+ monitors, the digital ones have "Digital" written on them, which is why I suspect analogue Best option (IMHO) would be to turf ...


3

My commute is also ~15 miles. Certainly don't worry about that heart monitor (not for commuting at least). Try not to eat any processed flours (including bread!). My breakfast is whole oats soaked in milk with nuts, berries, and whatever else you fancy. For the ride home it's important to get that same carb boost before you ride home (I eat 300-400 calories ...


3

Android can just about handle multiple BTLE sensors simultaneously but there are still some low level Android bugs that make it rather unreliable. The coding for is also a good bit more complex to get working than the single sensor case. I have support in my app IpBike via a beta version of IpSensorMan At this point in time if you were getting new then an ...


3

I have a habit of riding harder when I'm by myself. If I ride with a group or even with one other person I'm less likely to overdo it. Consider trying out a group ride. Try to pick a group where you will be in the top half. This might put a bit of a brake on you and give you a chance to build better habits you can use on solo rides.


3

You don't say how old you are but from your description, my guess is the problem may be dehydration which seems to affect us older guys more than younger ones. I experience this if I am not careful. It is a sinister problem that creeps up on you and before you know it, it is too late. S/S include muscle weakness, lack of energy, feeling very tired, mental ...


3

I can't speak to the specifics of arrythmia, but I will challenge the presumption a HR monitor is needed at all. Its entirely possible to train well without gadgets. If you feel the need for a gadget, a power meter would give a majority of cyclists the same advantages, if no more, as a heart rate monitor. At the elite level, some people now believe that ...


3

Max HR isn't a particularly useful metric. Not only is it particularly difficult to measure/estimate, but it can't be used to accurately define training zones, as there are large variations between individuals with regards to % of MHR they can sustain for various durations. It can even change for an individual based on their current state of training. ...


3

Whatever maximum you have achieved on a bike is your maximum verified heart rate. Since you have reached 202, it is at least 202. Ignore the formulas since you already know better. If you have an indoor trainer, or you have access to an exercise bike with a power meter, I would perform what is called a ramp test: Start with very easy pedaling for ten ...


2

I found driod support for these kinds of sensors to be patchy at best and not yet what I consider ready for prime time. Manufacturer provided software is often crap, third party often don't support the hardware. Many claims of features and devices suppported apply to the iPhone versions only. I current use Digifit iCardio on my driod phone with Scorche ...


2

I come to this question as (in chronological order) a speed skater, cyclist, and runner. I have been a full-time Data Whore since early 2007. I have used various Garmin devices and smartphones. What I have found works best is the device that is on your person, with a sufficiently charged battery, and actually recording data. I spent five years using a ...


2

I'm also a Windows Phone user but I'm still on Windows 8.1 until my phone gets the update. The app I use for recording my rides is Straza Mate, which is another unofficial Strava connected app. As far as I know, it doesn't support heart rate or cadence/speed sensors. I mostly using it for logging miles on commutes as I'm not really concerned about ...


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