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27

Unfortunately, most bikes are only rated to 300lbs or less. However, if this is a new bike, you should take it back to the shop and get them to fix it. They can't claim they didn't know you were a heavy rider when they sold you the bike. You might need to get more substantial wheels with more spokes. Wheels designed for touring bikes might be more ...


15

As a heavy rider personally, I don't have many issues with flats. A normal tire on the high/maximum pressure works fine to avoid pinch flats. The key is to check tire pressure every time you get on the bike. Even a day will allow a tire to soften 10 psi, and that will allow flats to occur. Road hazard flats are not avoidable except by avoiding the ...


12

The spokes and gears are likely unrelated issues. You have done 2000km on the bike - have you replaced the chain and rear cluster yet? At you weight and those hill climbs, I would not be surprised if they are just worn out. It is also possible that at your weight and that distance the spokes have come out of adjustment, and/or now have fatiguied to the ...


11

I completely agree with the accepted answer of @David Richerby from personal experience. As a heavier rider (~22 stone) for many years, I also found with a couple of different bicycles that the rear wheel tended to come out of true, especially when hitting bumps and potholes. My solution was to replace the rear wheel with a touring wheel with more spokes, ...


10

I know that you can buy lots of things online and that prices are competitive online, however, you do need to know exactly what you are buying, and, given that you have posted this question here, you might not be there yet... Please visit your local bike shop, explain to the sales staff what you are looking for, what distance you are having to put in, ...


8

120 KG is 265 lbs. You might want to contact the manufacturer to get an exact number on the recommended maximum rider weight. Other bikes by high end manufacturers usually are around 250-300 lbs. Usually aluminum/alloy frames are around 300 lbs while carbon frames are around 250 lbs. This isn't because carbon is weaker, but rather because carbon bikes are ...


8

Spokes getting loose is not a laughing matter. The more spokes get loose or break, the more uneven the load is distributed to the spokes, and the more likely other spokes are to get loose or break. Accumulate enough failed spokes, and your wheel fails. And failed spokes after only 24km means that something is very wrong with the wheel's built. As such, your ...


7

We don't do product rec here, but some general advice: You want to find the biggest tires you can fit into the bike, and run them at high pressure. The pressure written on the tire sidewall is useless (the maximum pressure depends on the rim and the tire), but in all likelihood you will be close to or exceeding it on many tires. The particular model of tire ...


7

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


7

Congratulations on not wanting to settle for a department store bike, Murray Huffy etc... You've made the right choice :) As for that particular bike, The specs don't seem all that spectacular. The "retail $900" price would not be very good, IMO, but the $400 sale price isn't bad. It looks like most of the parts are pretty low end, but that is to be ...


7

220 pounds (100kg) is not that heavy. At £459 or about US$600 retail, the Saracen is also not an inexpensive bike. It should be more than able to handle your weight unless you're doing very aggressive biking (such as hopping on and off curbs or doing wild jumps without the proper technique). Riding on rough roads is well within the design parameters of this ...


7

Do a web search for tandem tires. A tandem bike carries two people, so typical loads are even bigger than you. Also, definitely use a pressure gauge. You may think you can tell by feel, but I ride every day and can't tell the difference between 80 and 100 psi.


7

Fact: True pro-level road racing bikes from all eras, including but not limited to the current iteratons, prioritize being light as possible while durable enough, and the right kind of durable, for a pro racer. Fact: A heavy non-racer riding for fitness and pleasure doesn't really get any utilitarian benefit from the extra bit of weight reduction that ...


6

This is close to my goto answer for tyre issues. Tyres designed for touring use are meant for higher loads and inflation pressures. I run marathon plus on my commuter hybrid. They make a 26x2.0 version which is rated to a load of 260lb per tyre and 70psi inflation (which you could probably exceed a little). It's possble that won't fit your rim (see ...


6

For your weight, you either need to find reliable wheel builder who will make wheels for you, or you need to become one. Possibly both in that order. Wheel will be most important part of your bicycle and you should strive to put best components in it, and be sure it is built with your weight in mind. Unwinding of spokes is almost certainly result of not ...


5

A cruiser-style, semi-recumbent trike might be the best for you. You can lean back so your stomach isn't in the way. Your back is supported so all your weight isn't on your rear end. Two wheels in the back spread the weight and result in fewer rear tire punctures. The trike ensures that when you're stopped or riding really slowly (e.g., uphill), you won't ...


5

With regard to the shifting, you do need to understand proper shifting procedure. First off, with any derailleur-style bike the chain and sprockets need to be moving when you shift. (You're no doubt aware of this, but it bears mentioning.) Prior to the advent of "indexed" shifters, it was not possible to shift "under load" at all. To shift you had to ...


5

Manufacturer weight limits on bikes are a little nebulous in that they're not totally meaningless but they tend towards estimation, liability protection, and a fair line for the warranty department to take when a bike eventually breaks under a heavier load then they designed for. Going above it is an at your own risk thing because forks, wheels, and frames ...


5

As you probably know specific product recommendations are off topic here. However, three recommendations: Overbuilt wheels, heavy duty rim, 44 or 48 spokes. The biggest tire you can run, especially on the rear. Consider a full suspension bike. A 90kg rider coming off a big drop is going to generate as much force as you will going over a pothole. Props for ...


5

I won't get too much into product recommendations, but some general things to consider... You're going to wind up spending a lot of money on things other than your bicycle. At your size and presumed strength, you may need really good carbon-fiber soled cycling shoes to be able to ride any distance - plastic-soled shoes may be too flexible, which winds up ...


5

It is possible to re-tension loose spokes at home, using a spoke key and the frame of the bicycle as a truing stand. In your case I would not do so. If the wheel started to fail so quickly from new, I think it would fail again even faster with a home repair. In the worse case the wheel could fail catastrophically injuring you and damaging the bike. In the ...


4

It sounds like you have two separate problems. I'll comment on the spoke breakage, speaking as someone who's had trouble with rear wheels in the past. Bike wheels are surprisingly complex. Essentially if you have a wheel that's been perfectly built, with the spokes at a high and even tension, it should stay true for a long time, without any spokes ...


4

Its not unusual for wheels to go out of true within the first few miles or so of riding a new bike.. Especially if they're not built up strongly by a trained wheel builder... Most cheap to mid range bikes have wheels that are assembled by machine these days and the machines build them quite loose in a lot of cases.. Then when you put weight and lateral loads ...


4

Totally okay - you're focusing on the word tandem, when really both you and tandem riders want a "high spoke count" wheel. 36 spokes or 40 spokes or even 48 spoke hubs and rims exist but not so common in 44 spoke. The values that are important in sizing a wheel to suit your bike are Over-Locknut Distance or OLD. This is the space between the inside of ...


3

Specific product recommendations are off-topic here but we can provide some guidance that will help you choose an appropriate wheel. You can replace both front and rear wheels without having to replace any other components. For the rear you have to move the sprocket cassette to the new wheel. This requires a special tool but is straightforward. Disc rotors ...


3

As mentioned in comments specific product recommendations are off topic here. (See What topics can I ask about here?). Answering the question about suitability of the bikes you link to for the commuting you want to do: A mountain bike at this price point would not be a good choice for commuting on paved roads or paths. The forks are low-end and basically ...


3

Loose spokes and buckling wheels on a new bike are definitely not normal. That could be incorrect assembly but may also be a result of the weight of the rider and not getting the right advice: The design specifications in the GT tech manual book list "330 lbs / 150 kg" as the maximum weight limit for that model. Although not explicitly mentioned for ...


2

Most of the times the frames aren't the biggest issue with weight. What's mostly limiting are the wheels. Especially if theses are cheaper 29" wheels you should check the manufacturer for a weight restriction. But in the end it depends on what you mostly ride with the bike. If it is mostly commuting you should be fine. As said before the front shock could ...


2

You could try converting your tyres to a tubeless system. I run much lower pressures on my tubeless mountain bike than I used to - they are super resistant to pinch flats. Every now and then I can feel the rear wheel pinching in a way that would previously have caused an instant flat but to date no flats (touch wood!). I find (anecdotal) that the tubeless ...


2

I would go for a 'sit up and beg' kind of bike made by a company that makes kids as well as adult frames of the same design. Sitting up allows for more belly room. Those often have bikes all the way from the child sizes into the adult sizes. In the Netherlands a lot of older kids and young teens ride those range of sizes. The bikes are mostly very sturdy, ...


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