35

The gearing of your bike seems reasonable, the 26 front/34 rear combination will (eventually) make climbing hills easy. But till then… Before you do anything else, take @cherouvim's advice and make sure you seat is at a reasonable height. It should be high enough that if you place a heel on the low pedal your leg is almost fully extended (just short of ...


28

Simply, I reject the premise of your question and I'm sure I'm not alone. I say that as someone who has a tourer and a hybrid, and commutes on both - the speed difference is much less than the variability in traffic volumes. In practical commuting conditions you're rarely aero-limited anyway, rather it's the speed of traffic, and to a lesser extent the ...


28

Not enough points to comment, so here is an answer instead, based mostly on my own experience. I've been using a bike as my main, if not sole, mean of transportation for the last 20 years or so. During that time, my weight changed a lot (from 80 to 130kgs (176 - 286 lbs)). When I was 80, I nearly never broke a spoke (maybe once per 10 000km), and only after ...


26

That's not the correct skewer for the wheel. I think you likely are using the rear skewer in the font wheel. Front hubs are typically 100mm between the drop-outs, rear are 130 or 135mm (or even 145mm on some mountain bikes that have stronger through-axle designs).


26

I have ridden bikes with different sizes of wheels, from 29" MTB/622 Road wheels, through 20" folder, 12" scooters, and one folding A-bike with 6" wheels. My perception is that the bigger the wheel's radius, the better it is at rolling. The smaller wheels will hang up much more easily on small obstructions like stones, cracks/joints, or ...


24

You are wrong that hybrid style bicycles have no advantages over drop bar road bikes. You kind-of invalidated your premise by saying hybrids are a compromise, which means by definition certain beneficial features have been chosen over others in order to obtain a desired result. In fact all bike styles are a design compromise. Compared to a road bike ...


22

You are absolutely fine riding the Trek FX 7.2 with the Bontrager tires on that trail. That gravel surface is not any worse than rough, worn tarmac so go ahead and enjoy those trails. You don't really need much tire tread (or any) on flat crushed gravel trails, 35mm wide tires have plenty of volume. Be aware that you will have less grip, both in cornering ...


21

A 3-year-old affects the bike's balance and handling, so you want something quite forgiving. Suspension will make you work really hard with the extra weight bouncing around over the back wheel (even just front suspension) and you should be wary about riding the sort of thing that really needs it on a back-heavy, top-heavy bike. Road frames are often carbon ...


20

While my initial attempt with lightly deflated tires was not a success (I could only bike 100 m before being exhausted) my second attempt went much better. Based on your helpful answers, comments and suggestions I deflated my rear tire to 1.5 bar, and my front tire to 2 bar and rode at the waterline without much problems at an average speed of 20 km/h. I was ...


19

I suggest you get the wheel rebuilt properly, once and for all (probably by a different bike shop). A well-built wheel should be able to handle even riding off kerbs or small unavoidable potholes without breaking spokes. You should unweight the saddle and take the weight on your feet, but even if you don't it should survive an occasional hit. A hybrid like ...


17

Just keep on doing the same route and you'll see progress very fast. Also this will soon not be true: It's not so fun on the way back though Some tips to make it: make sure that the tyres are inflated correctly make sure your drivetrain runs smooth and the chain is lubed make sure your seat height is correct (ask your LBS if unsure) conserve energy ...


15

I posted a comment Slick tires would make a difference, if you're not using them. Maintaining 24 kph on a hybrid that you ride one day a week is pretty good. The next two increments after slick tires would be clipless pedals, riding more frequently, and then a road bike. ... but decided a full answer was needed. Given that the trip is 24 km, doing it in ...


13

After @ChrisH's thorough answer (+1) I thought I'd give an experience report. When my kids were small, I used a general purpose touring frame for this job. It has more relaxed geometry than a road bike, mudguards (fenders), wider tires, and SPD pedals. It's also heavier, which is an advantage for this application. The child seat I used was similar to the ...


13

Each type and size of tire has a different pressure range. The range is written or embossed right on the side of the tire. The actual pressure you choose is dependent on what you are using the bike for, the road surface you ride on and your general preference. A safe choice the middle of the specified pressure range. Lower pressure will give a bit more ...


12

Hub Width On road, mountain, and hybrid, the front hubs are 100mm in width. On road bicycles the rear is typically 130mm, where on a MTB it is typically 135mm. Measure this from your old hub, and DON'T stretch/force a different hub width. Wheel (Rim) Diameter The most typical road rim is a 700c which will mean the bead seat diameter of the rim is 622mm, ...


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


12

When I lightly apply the brakes only one part makes contact with the wheel There are two adjustment screws (Spring tension centering screw on the picture below) which are meant to center pads of V-brakes. Screwing one in makes a corresponding pad to move farther from the rim, screwing it out does the opposite. It makes sense to loosen one screw a ¼ turn and ...


11

Depending on your budget and family enlargement plans, what you can also consider is to buy narrow, 2-wheel cargo bike like below. It's easy to ride, like traditional bike and can be seen as multi-purpose mean of transport. Equipped with roller brakes and internal gear hub will be reliable, easy to handle and cheap in service. After @Criggie comment It is ...


11

Before looking to improve the bike, I'd look to improve your fitness. I was able to average 13–14mph on my hybrid for 1–1.5hrs; at that time, I was commuting 3–5 miles each way per day and maybe a weekend ride of 15–20 miles once or twice a month. Hybrids aren't designed for going fast but, at 11mph, there's not a huge aerodynamic ...


11

I cycle round a city (Chester) every day, typically covering five to ten miles in a trip. Even though this is on allegedly high quality roads the reality is that there are a lot of potholes and other rough surfaces. Indeed, some of the roads are cobbled and inherently rough. I use a road bicycle (no suspension) with 700C wheels, and even with the large wheel ...


10

I'm not sure that anyone is going to be able to give you a definitive answer... especially since you are asking if your commute will improve by 30 seconds when the commute time you give has a range of 60 seconds. But 30 seconds out of 17.5 minutes is about a 2-3% improvement, which seems reasonable... The more interesting question would be "what can this ...


10

There are no shortcuts, it's about building the legs, and lungs, and body. There may be some factors that could make it a little easier, but the main factor is getting strong enough, which takes some time and some dedication. Starting in the easiest gear may not be the best choice as it can make a climb seem endless. Try to get into the hill at good speed, ...


10

When you switch to the crankset behind cogs, you need to move the derailleur above the cogset. Think of it as rotating the entire drive train 180 degrees forward or flipping the entire bike over the bars and then moving wheels down until they touch the ground. Note that the different crank positions require different chain length.


10

I'm a bike shop employee of five years, and I've been a bike commuter for ten. In general, a modern gravel or cyclocross bike is more efficient, more versatile, and just as or more comfortable as a hybrid (when fit properly). So why buy a hybrid? Because they start off at half the price of a road bike. Basic mountain components are dirt-cheap compared to ...


10

For that trail you've got a very suitable combination of bike and tyres. I'd happily ride all day that on my 32mm marathon supremes, which are more of a road tyre than you've got. We have a similar surface on parts of a local trail; some riders will happily ride 25mm slicks on that but others are less happy on 28mm or smaller. Looser gravel is OK for ...


10

Your bike is not really a road bike, it is a cyclocross bike (CX, not XC). Although they look similar and use the same type of handlebars, they serve different purposes. Cyclocross bikes are made for 1-hour races in very twisty off-road courses. They need to be able to make very short turns and do not have to be very stable. They also do not have to be very ...


9

Since a hybrid is a combination of two or more types of bike characteristics, there are many possibilities, and you should consider what aspects of the particular bike where meant for the mountain or for the road and see if they meet you needs. Tires You can use almost any tire, provided your frame has the clearance needed. Wider tires can be safely used ...


9

It depends on your transmission. Some internal gear hubs, for example, are perfectly happy being shifted at a standstill. For a derailleur based system, you should shift while in motion while pedaling lightly. It isn't ideal to shift under load, and shifts will be sloppier under load typically. The question of when to shift while riding is a matter of ...


9

The hybrid I use to get around town and short distances: has dynamo lights a rack with no risk of heel strike wide mudguards 35mm tyres a chainguard triple chainring & mtb gear ratios allowing me to tow a heavily laden trailer up steep hills. very easy to hop and just ride wearing anything including a suit. Reassuring in icy conditions Whilst you ...


9

This question gets asked quite often. The short answer is that you can do long distance rides on basically any bicycle as long as it’s comfortable for you. There are a few things you can do to your bicycle to make it more efficient and easier: Make sure your seating position is good. Especially that your saddle is high enough. This will improve power ...


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