27

Not enough points to comment, so here is an answer instead, based mostly on my own experience. I've been using a bike as my main, if not sole, mean of transportation for the last 20 years or so. During that time, my weight changed a lot (from 80 to 130kgs (176 - 286 lbs)). When I was 80, I nearly never broke a spoke (maybe once per 10 000km), and only after ...


22

You are absolutely fine riding the Trek FX 7.2 with the Bontrager tires on that trail. That gravel surface is not any worse than rough, worn tarmac so go ahead and enjoy those trails. You don't really need much tire tread (or any) on flat crushed gravel trails, 35mm wide tires have plenty of volume. Be aware that you will have less grip, both in cornering ...


19

I suggest you get the wheel rebuilt properly, once and for all (probably by a different bike shop). A well-built wheel should be able to handle even riding off kerbs or small unavoidable potholes without breaking spokes. You should unweight the saddle and take the weight on your feet, but even if you don't it should survive an occasional hit. A hybrid like ...


11

Before looking to improve the bike, I'd look to improve your fitness. I was able to average 13–14mph on my hybrid for 1–1.5hrs; at that time, I was commuting 3–5 miles each way per day and maybe a weekend ride of 15–20 miles once or twice a month. Hybrids aren't designed for going fast but, at 11mph, there's not a huge aerodynamic ...


10

For that trail you've got a very suitable combination of bike and tyres. I'd happily ride all day that on my 32mm marathon supremes, which are more of a road tyre than you've got. We have a similar surface on parts of a local trail; some riders will happily ride 25mm slicks on that but others are less happy on 28mm or smaller. Looser gravel is OK for ...


9

This question gets asked quite often. The short answer is that you can do long distance rides on basically any bicycle as long as it’s comfortable for you. There are a few things you can do to your bicycle to make it more efficient and easier: Make sure your seating position is good. Especially that your saddle is high enough. This will improve power ...


9

At this price category new brands are created all the time and badged onto generic Chinese bikes. There is next to no difference with regard to quality between brands. While 16k rupees (about 200 £|€|$) may be a lot of money in India, it is still a bit below the costs of a bike of reliable quality. Shimano tourney components are a good sign in an ...


9

First congratulations and encouragement for getting out there on the bike. Don't get discouraged, the problem is fixable. I totally agree with other answers saying get the wheel rebuilt with new spokes. I'd go with heaver gauge spokes as well. Although this will cost some money it's likely the most cost-effective option in the long run. I'd make some ...


8

You can certainly do Brevet Populaires (100 km). Plenty of people do them on all sorts of bikes. I've seen a few people on flat bars on Brevets de Randonneurs 200 in the UK, including an MTB with knobbly tyres (the one with the backpack in this picture). Hybrids on these rides tend to be set up as flat bar road bikes, i.e. smoothish tyres around 25-...


7

Is it okay to buy from a new brand? All bicycle brands were new at one time. Some new brands have been very good and others not. How can we tell a good brand from a bad brand? TLDR (Too Long Didn't Read) skip down to the "Things to keep in mind" section Some background on how a bike gets to you. Most bicycle companies today: Purchase parts from ...


6

Your hybrid has a riding position that is designed for comfort rather than speed. The bars are level with the saddle and not too far forward. Presumably you are having to bend your elbows to lean forward, rather than being in a more neutral position with slightly bent elbows and shoulder s down. You could try dropping the stem on the steerer tube, and ...


6

In practice, most people find hybrids rather uncomfortable for long rides. What "long" means varies from person to person so, to a large extent, you'll just have to try going on longer and longer rides until you find out what your body is comfortable with. I would note, though, that 40 minutes at the 11mph you said you average in your other question is a ...


6

28mm wide tires are perfectly suitable for riding hard-packed fine gravel trail surfaces. You do have to be more careful when braking and cornering than on tarmac as the top surface is loose. Larger rocks and potholes should be avoided of course. As the size of the gravel particles gets larger or the depth of the loose gravel top surface gets deeper the ...


5

Your tire size is 700x38, meaning the overall width of the tire is 38 mm. Inner tubes are sold in ranges of sizes rather than for specific widths. eg 700x23-25 - means this is suitable for 23 to 25 mm; 700x28-32 - suitable for 28 to 32 mm; 700x35-42 - suitable for 35 to 42 mm; and so on. So you need to find a tube has your tire width (38 mm) that falls ...


5

Two summers ago I rode 1,300 miles around Lake Superior on a Trek Verve 2, averaging about 70 miles a day. I am over 60 years old, and I like a more comfortable ride at this stage. The more durable tire of a hybrid came in handy when I needed to navigate rougher terrain. These days I am riding a Specialized Cross Trail on long rides. I love it.


4

Impossible to tell you whether a couple of centimeters either way will make a bike fit you better. A slightly lower bar may actually suit you better than a higher bar, even though you value comfort over speed. You might feel slightly more stable with a little more weight on the front wheel. Honestly you just need to ride the bikes back to back and make a ...


4

It's never going to work great, but whether it works at all depends on how much vertical clearance you have to work with. When you push the tire size, what happens is the fender can't wrap around the tire properly, and instead the tire wants to rub against the "gutter" or side of the fender. If you can simply gap the fender further away, you might be able to ...


4

Just posting an answer to confirm that I've now gone on this trail multiple times, and my bike has handled it perfectly fine. It's not quite as good as pavement, but the difference is small. I also took a picture of the trail itself to help other others wondering about similiar trails (the one from question is from the trail website):


4

There are three factors to consider with gravel roads: Smoothness of surface A gravel road that's been abused by cars for a while develops first small, regular ripples. These are a PITA to ride on without suspension, as the ripples tend to be hard to avoid, and hard to see in the first place. After those ripples form, some of them develop into veritable ...


4

I intend to use it as an mtb or gravel bike I assume you mean "MTB" as "cross-country", and I assume you do not plan to take part in competitions, except in those meant for absolute beginners. The most important thing you could have done is to change tires to the widest the frame/fork would fit. However, this bike already comes with tires 35 mm wide, and I ...


4

I see that Malvern don't highlight rider height and weight on their website info (https://www.bicyclesuperstore.com.au/malvern-star-sprint-1-2019.html) for this bike, but they do highlight that it's a lightweight alloy framed bike. I'd suspect that at 100kg you may be at or above the intended weight for the bike (I know my road bike has a 95kg rider weight ...


3

I use a 700x23 butyl inner tubes (I've tested Michelin, Pirelli and Kenda) in a 700x28 tyre and I've had no problems so far. But 700x20 one is 'too thin' in this set, so it can explode. It depends on the brand and you can't rely on the assumption that every inner tube will work in every tyre.


3

Will my bike be suitable, comfortable and safe (for the bike and for the rider) on off-road tracks? That depends on the rider. I've watched people hop over 2-ft logs on road bikes. That said, 28 mm tires and flat or drop bars on gravel or dirt roads is typically fine as long you pay attention to your line. However, I'm how vetted is your route? If the ...


3

I would switch back the tires to your old 35mm. Other than that, you should be OK. Don't forget to have spare tube or two and pump in case of puncture.


3

There are pros and cons to each type of bike: Road bike advantages (imo): Light weight Less rolling resistance/easier to maintain higher top speed Easier maintenance in some cases (less paniers, fenders etc. That can get in the way of things better looks? Hybrid bike advantages: Pre installed fenders (you won't get dirty when riding) More mounting points ...


3

The key to a lower position on any bike is core stability. You may have a look at Emma Pooley's video exercises. I found them rather helpful. Two further aspects are the power you put through your cranks and your position on the bike. Ideally if your centre of mass (CoM) is roughly over the bottom bracket you should be able to reduce the force on your ...


3

This is not normal. Modern bikes should not throw the chain off the rings, either off the outside, inside or between the rings when changing gear. The front derailleur is probably set up wrong. Don’t let the bike store staff tell you it’s normal. You have a choice here so just buy a bike that works right from the beginning. It's true that you don't want ...


3

Last year I rode the Houston MS-150 on a hybrid. This year some guy rode it on a penny-farthing. Your bike should be no problem, as long as it's a bike that fits you.


3

From your post here is what I understand the issue is: When I try to lean forward and try to increase my speed, my hands get fatigued and I can’t do it for longer durations....How can I go faster on a hybrid bike with this tyre and handlebar combination? So, you'd like to find a way to be comfortable leaning forward and to go faster for a longer period ...


2

Bike shop fitter here. Three recommendations: Try out some road saddles that have a large cutout and a shape that lets you lean forward more effectively while still supporting your pelvis. Make sure the shop has a trial period on saddles in case it doesn't work out after a few rides. Good road saddles run $100-$150. I recommend the Specialized Power saddle ...


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