New answers tagged

1

I tend to agree that the differences between the two bikes you listed are minor. It comes down to personal fit, like Criggie said. Another option is buying used. If you aren't married to the Munich or the Downtown, used is the way to go. I'm in the United States where, unfortunately, $200 just won't get you much brand new. You should be able to find a ...


0

Downvoted because the question is off-topic, but I will give you a few pieces of advice... You do not need disk brakes. They add cost, add weight, and you will not need the braking power they provide in the city. You (probably) do not need suspension. If you are able to lift yourself out of the saddle when you go over bumps, you don't need suspension. You ...


3

For your price range it might be wiser to get an older higher quality second-hand bike. A touring bike from the 90s might be in that price range (they are in Europe, I'm not sure about the USA) and it will be tough enough to deal with any commute while also being set up for longer rides too. If you can find one which hasn't been modified by the owner then ...


5

I can certainly recommend books by Lennard Zinn, namely Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance and Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance I think that the mountain bike version would probably be more suitable for your hybrid bike and it is the version I own. Many of the topics are universal. The author also often answers questions at his https:...


6

I've been in the same position before, and I'd highly recommend reading through some of the articles on https://www.sheldonbrown.com/ as you come across problems you need to fix. Sorry for providing just a link but it is very much like a guide book. I'll often refer to the website when checking for compatible replacement parts, for example!


7

Ultimately, you're comparing two entry level bikes. The differences are small and mostly irrelevant. The one thing that really matters is how they fit you - ride both and figure which one is more comfortable to you. So bare minimum is to get a leg over each one and ride it around. Most bike shops will let you pedal around, which is enough to rank them in ...


7

Your area may have some kind of "bicycle collective" with tools, education, and parts (typically used but with some life left), e.g., [1]. Universities may have one. [1] https://corvallisbikes.org/


9

Link-only answers are frowned upon here but I'm going to provide one anyway https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help Park Tool Company's Repair Help web site is the most comprehensive, professional and understandable set of articles and videos on bike repair and maintenance that is out there. If you run into specific problems, Bicycles Stack Exchange is of ...


4

You must definitely buy an air pump and some instruments which help you to tight or loose your brakes,adjust you seat etc.(They come most of the time free with the bicycle). Air pump is important in my opinion Because tires keep on loosing air due to temperature changes because tires contract and expand and also due weight of the rider. Maintain your cycle. ...


8

In short, ride your bike. Do a basic M check for safety, monthly. Wash your bike when its dirty. Lube the chain periodically (depends on your riding conditions) And ride safely. As components and consumables wear, ask specific questions (if we don't already have that covered in a previous Q&A.) Enjoy riding !


2

Product recommendations are off-topic on this site because they are geography-specific, taste-specific and quickly go out of date. However, there are several questions in your question that can be answered (and as such, they should have been submitted as individual questions to the web site in the first place). Let me address a few of them. The need is ...


5

I would definitely not consider suspension on a hybrid bike for 2 reasons. A suspension fork typically has very little to offer on the type of terrain you would ride a hybrid on. A high quality high volume tyre (ideally tubeless) with a supple casing will do a great job smoothing the ride. At the price point of most hybrid style bikes suspension forks are ...


1

A corollary point - you need to find a way to protect your bike from damage while it is parked. Overnight is many hours of time when your bike is exposed and there are few people around. If you were in a rack, park it further away from where people walk. If your bike was blocking someone else, don't. If you had unwittingly taken "someone's spot" ...


9

You already know the answer to this question. Slashes in the sidewall tend to open up as the pressure from inner tube is pushing the tire further apart. If you're lucky you might escape with a simple pinch flat. More serious problems include: the inner tube pushing through the sidewall rubbing on the frame or fork causing the inner tube to burst like a ...


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