25

I find that using my primary hand (my writing hand) is better than the other one. Keep eyes on the road, you should not have to look to find your bottle. I use my teeth to open the sippy valve, breathe in and then take a small drink and hold it for a sec before swallowing. Sometimes I hold the bottle over the bars for 5-10 seconds to let the first ...


23

Inertia. Bottles are about that big because that's how big bottle cages are, because that's how big bottles are.... repeat. Another cause is that a 10cm bottle would be larger and harder to hold/easier to drop while riding. Most riders would drink while rolling on the bike, so its potentially bumpy, with a layer of sweat/sunscreen/rain making things a bit ...


22

The trick is to blow the water back up the tube and into the reservoir right after you take a drink. This will keep your tube and bite valve from freezing. This works well even at below freezing temperatures when skiing.


16

When I first started doing longer distance rides, the rule-of-thumb I was told was "drink a bottle every hour." Obviously, that's a very rough figure, and it's going to depend on a lot of factors, including how much you're sweating (a combination of workload and heat+humidity), how much you weigh, and just generally how much fluid you personally ...


14

Plan your route accordingly. Make sure there's a couple gas stations or restaurants along the way that you could stop at if the need arises. It's probably a good idea to be somewhat close to civilization not only for urination purposes, but also in case you have some major mechanical problem with your bike, or you fall and get hurt. This doesn't mean your ...


13

Yes, floor pumps can condense water in them. The water is from atmospheric water vapor. When the pump walls are colder than the surrounding air, the vapor can condense just like dew forms on leaves in the morning. Temperature swings assist in the formation of dew and this is made worse by leaving it on concrete, which is not only often much colder than the ...


12

Good luck on your brevet attempt! 200km, or 124 miles, is a long ride. For reference, on the road, average riders might complete a century ride (160km/100mi) in 5-7 hours, maybe less if one is with a fast group. Note: I initially recommended that the OP drink ahead of thirst. In comments, @whatisname contended that this advice is based on a myth. On further ...


11

I see snowboarders with an insulating cover over the tube. If that doesn't provide enough insulation, I've worn my pack under my jacket leaving the entire pack, tube and bite valve covered and insulated. Here is a 3 foot Hydration Pack Insulated Drink Tube Cover on amazon for $7 US


11

Openstreetmap with the cycle layer certainly shows some. Here's one I was very grateful for in the French Alps. OSM is not complete but it's open source so you can improve it (I haven't added any taps, but I have added bike parking). This is a good approach, as it also shows cafes and shops where you should be able to buy water if there's no tap (flipping ...


10

In the past I was used to buy sport drinks - like Gatorade - spending a lot of money and always in doubt about their efficiency. But my sport Nutritionist suggested me a simple, natural and efficient recipe you can make at home for a tasty (and really cheap) sport drink: 500 ml water; 2 tablespoon sugar; 1 teaspoon salt; Juice from one orange; Just mix ...


10

As noted above, the reason for not using fatter bottles is being able to have a firm enough grip on them to grab them, drink and stow them again with one hand while riding. The best solution for easily carrying large amounts of water is a hydration pack, but they're definitely not for everyone. (Not me either; I can't stand riding with that much weight on ...


9

Yes, too many electrolytes can do all sorts of bad things to you. Good article here: http://www.livestrong.com/article/521763-can-you-consume-too-much-electrolytes/ The U.S. Army has done a lot of research, here's probably the most pertinent paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10410838 In general, if you are mixing the drinks according to the ...


9

To quote David Richerby: You're over-thinking this. Most people close their bottles most of the time. I'm not one to worry about a little "gunk", but I close my bottle more than half the time. I almost never wipe it (heh, I almost never wash it :-) Not fanatical about it though. If I'm taking a quick swig before a corner then I'll just jamb the bottle ...


9

I've almost done this, and its not "easy" but it should be possible. However a non-stop 100 km is much harder than simply doing 100 km. Try working up do it. I don't know what your current distance is for a "big ride" but start with 25 km non-stop, then work up to 50, 75, and then 100 km. Leave early in the morning on your big rides - it seems to help ...


9

I've got a few individually wrapped tablets (and equivalent powders) that came as samples. I never use them when starting from home instead saving them for carrying with me. This works for long hot days, but on a multi-day trip would soon run out, and the packaging is wasteful. The tubes protect the tablets from crushing, though they add bulk compared to ...


9

One reason is the industry measures weight savings in $10's/gram - water heavy, ergo it is expensive. Cyclists tend to plan to refill with water on route if they need large amounts. A couple of typical bottles gives around 2 litres - large enough for a days riding for 95% of riders, of the remaining 5%, 4.5% use a bladder. This means the market for a ...


8

For a start you can get bigger cages. I use a Topeak Modula EX sometimes, which is adjustable to ⌀74 mm (also for the Modula II, with a metal clip instead of plastic). This is noticeably bigger than a standard cage, and is good for many sizes bottled water is sold in. The Modula range might include the biggest bottle holders: the Modula Java is meant for ...


7

I've got a Cambelbak MULE which has about 11l of pack capacity. I found that this is quite enough for day-long rides, far from any roads. I packed: tools spare tube patch kit pump a spare tyre sometimes some food (energy bars and similar low-volume-high-yield food) small first aid kit rain jacket a warm undershirt if necessary My fullface helmet could be ...


7

it would seem to me that nutrition, hydration, waste disposal and arm fatigue would be the greatest challenges Nutrition: isn't that hard, although if you haven't already, you might want to spend some time figuring out what food works for you on the move. You want things that are fairly calorie-dense, probably not too much fibre (see point #3) and agree ...


7

Remove bottle from bottle cage and keep riding using the hand not holding the bottle Pull up the cap with teeth Squeeze bottle in the mouth (if soft bottle) or suck liquid in (if hard bottle) Swallow and repeat if necessary Push back bottle cap with mouth/teeth Place bottle back in bottle cage Any problem with the above sequence is either due to: lack of ...


7

I switched to CamelBak's podium bottle, which has a lock and a self-sealing "Jet Valve" that only has water come out if you squeeze really hard. This has made the whole process easier (and better for your teeth)! Also, if you keep one hand on a handlebar, and use your sense of touch with the other hand, you never have to take your eyes off the road! My ...


7

Stuffing the free space in the container with tissue paper has worked for me fairly well in the past. Alternatively, just embrace it and move from tablets to a powder, which is what I use now - it's easier to pack into other containers / bags and can be easier to fit into luggage or pockets etc. Just make sure the container you choose seals well - that ...


7

This is just some additional tips. One thing I do on really long rides (first on a 400km brevet) is set a periodic reminder on my phone to drink every 15 minutes, also to stretch, and to consume some calories every half hour. Also a proper drink before and after each snack. On a 200 a proper stop is a good idea, and popular: walking around, sitting on ...


6

Keep the bladder as close to your skin as possible. This will help it utilize the same heat and insulation you are using. Run the tube under your shoulder. The area over your shoulder is more exposed to wind and will generally freeze faster. After taking a drink, blow back into the tube to clear it. If there is no water in the tube, there is nothing to ...


6

In the USA free tap water is virtually universal, and I was able to fill up my water bottles at any fast food restaurant and convenience store I stopped at, all over the country. A switch on most restaurant soda fountains will dispense plain tap water. I also filled up at local parks and roadside rest areas.


6

tourers basically live on their bikes and that cycling is a sport that really makes people sweat Tourers may basically live on their bikes, but it does not need to be a sport that really makes people sweat unless on (steep) climbs in sunny or hot weather. I've done some moderate 2-5 day multi-day trips in Scandinavia, and I rarely sweat. Touring is (...


5

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


5

Alternative suggestion - don't take a pack. They make your back hot and sweaty and raise your center of mass. Instead I carry two water bottles, so 1.5 L of liquid, enough for ~3 hours of normal weather. My toolbag and one tube is velcro strapped to the frame along with the frame pump. I wear a generic road top with three pockets in the lower back. ...


5

Here's a summary of some the options I've found: Manual: Blow back the water back in to your bladder to prevent freezing, this can cause your hydration reservoir to bulge though. I've also heard this can introduce bacteria to the bladder, making it get funky faster. This is less effective when you have a smaller amount of water in your bladder. Use a ...


5

The tube has a lot of surface area and not a lot of volume, so it's going to lose heat quickly compared to the reservoir. In addition to insulating the tube mentioned by Glenn Gervais you can start with hot water in the reservoir and frequently drink a little bit to keep reheating the tube. This Nordic skiing article discusses this technique in more detail. ...


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