23

Inertia. Bottles are about that big because that's how big bottle cages are, because that's how big bottles are.... repeat. Another cause is that a 10cm bottle would be larger and harder to hold/easier to drop while riding. Most riders would drink while rolling on the bike, so its potentially bumpy, with a layer of sweat/sunscreen/rain making things a bit ...


17

When I first started doing longer distance rides, the rule-of-thumb I was told was "drink a bottle every hour." Obviously, that's a very rough figure, and it's going to depend on a lot of factors, including how much you're sweating (a combination of workload and heat+humidity), how much you weigh, and just generally how much fluid you personally ...


12

Good luck on your brevet attempt! 200km, or 124 miles, is a long ride. For reference, on the road, average riders might complete a century ride (160km/100mi) in 5-7 hours, maybe less if one is with a fast group. Note: I initially recommended that the OP drink ahead of thirst. In comments, @whatisname contended that this advice is based on a myth. On further ...


10

As noted above, the reason for not using fatter bottles is being able to have a firm enough grip on them to grab them, drink and stow them again with one hand while riding. The best solution for easily carrying large amounts of water is a hydration pack, but they're definitely not for everyone. (Not me either; I can't stand riding with that much weight on ...


9

One reason is the industry measures weight savings in $10's/gram - water heavy, ergo it is expensive. Cyclists tend to plan to refill with water on route if they need large amounts. A couple of typical bottles gives around 2 litres - large enough for a days riding for 95% of riders, of the remaining 5%, 4.5% use a bladder. This means the market for a ...


8

For a start you can get bigger cages. I use a Topeak Modula EX sometimes, which is adjustable to ⌀74 mm (also for the Modula II, with a metal clip instead of plastic). This is noticeably bigger than a standard cage, and is good for many sizes bottled water is sold in. The Modula range might include the biggest bottle holders: the Modula Java is meant for ...


7

This is just some additional tips. One thing I do on really long rides (first on a 400km brevet) is set a periodic reminder on my phone to drink every 15 minutes, also to stretch, and to consume some calories every half hour. Also a proper drink before and after each snack. On a 200 a proper stop is a good idea, and popular: walking around, sitting on ...


6

tourers basically live on their bikes and that cycling is a sport that really makes people sweat Tourers may basically live on their bikes, but it does not need to be a sport that really makes people sweat unless on (steep) climbs in sunny or hot weather. I've done some moderate 2-5 day multi-day trips in Scandinavia, and I rarely sweat. Touring is (...


5

There's a more simple answer for bottle size which no-one seems to have touched on. For safety, cyclists need one hand on the bars at all times, which means any water bottle needs to be able to be used in one hand. Yes I'm sure many of you can ride no-hands on flat pavement - so can I. Now show us in town in traffic, or on a trail, or when you're trying to ...


4

Medically, dehydration is usually detected/defined as a 5% increase in the concentration of solutes in your blood. Thirst sets in at about 2%, so you'll always feel strong thirst setting in long before you're dehydrated. This is basically a way of measuring the fact that your blood volume is low. Body weight is not a reliable way of measuring this. Your body ...


4

Product recommendations are generally not the thing here. There is however a reputed 4-letter Swiss company that has been producing internally glazed aluminium water bottles especially for cycling, properly fitting in standard bottle cages for many decades now. And since it is Swiss it will certainly go on for much longer. The problem however with ...


2

There is a common format used by all major bottle and holder makers. At least the typical plastic ones, I do not use any other. Wikipedia specifies it as: "The standard size of bottle cage holds a bottle 2-7/8 inches (2.875") or 73 mm in diameter and five inches (5") or 127 mm tall, or with an indentation that far from the bottom for the tab on the cage to ...


2

The answer is simple: Drink when you're thirsty. And, it has a similar counterpart: Eat when you're hungry. Yes, it doesn't have to be any more complicated than that.* We're creatures that are the result of millions of years of evolution, constantly tweaking the biochemical pathways that make us work. "Sports medicine" and practices more ...


2

You need more water when it's hot—-particularly on the days your body isn't you yet adapted to the heat. You need less water if the effort is lower. Some days that's a lot of water per hour and some days it's almost none. I hate to answer with a product when you're asking for a rule of thumb, but I've been really impressed with the hydration tracking ...


1

There are lots of options for larger bottle cages, but they take a bit of searching. TwoFish 40oz Bottle Cage ABC Cage This cage can tighten, and is often seen underneath the down-tube where folks will use it for fuel tanks or 1.5L of water. BBB Fuel Tank XL This has a "latch" on top to keep the larger bottle in place. Blackburn Tallboy This ...


1

The bottle and cage design really comes from racing and was adopted by ordinary cyclists because it is handy. For most shorter rides one is fine with one or two 0.5 l bidons. For longer rides you can refill them or take up to 1 l ones with you. The racers use small light bottles and get new ones often. We usually tend to make rehydrating stops at ...


1

The bottle size could be connected more from the road cycling than touring. In you tube videos you could see people loading up to 10 Liters of water. Another factor to take in account is the ambient temperature and relative moisture. Right now (july in Centralamerica), I have to drink between 2 -- 3 litters per day to be hidrated. Just think a trip under the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible