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1

There are lots of options for larger bottle cages, but they take a bit of searching. TwoFish 40oz Bottle Cage ABC Cage This cage can tighten, and is often seen underneath the down-tube where folks will use it for fuel tanks or 1.5L of water. BBB Fuel Tank XL This has a "latch" on top to keep the larger bottle in place. Blackburn Tallboy This ...


5

There's a more simple answer for bottle size which no-one seems to have touched on. For safety, cyclists need one hand on the bars at all times, which means any water bottle needs to be able to be used in one hand. Yes I'm sure many of you can ride no-hands on flat pavement - so can I. Now show us in town in traffic, or on a trail, or when you're trying to ...


0

You can get bottle cages for 1.5l (or even 2l) PET bottles but it will be very hard to drink from such a bottle while riding. When travelling I have two 1l (largest bicycle bottles) and one 1.5l bottle (PET) on the bike. The third bottle cage is mounted to the down tube with steel hose clamps. This way I can carry 3.5l and only have to refill twice a day. On ...


1

The bottle and cage design really comes from racing and was adopted by ordinary cyclists because it is handy. For most shorter rides one is fine with one or two 0.5 l bidons. For longer rides you can refill them or take up to 1 l ones with you. The racers use small light bottles and get new ones often. We usually tend to make rehydrating stops at ...


6

tourers basically live on their bikes and that cycling is a sport that really makes people sweat Tourers may basically live on their bikes, but it does not need to be a sport that really makes people sweat unless on (steep) climbs in sunny or hot weather. I've done some moderate 2-5 day multi-day trips in Scandinavia, and I rarely sweat. Touring is (...


10

As noted above, the reason for not using fatter bottles is being able to have a firm enough grip on them to grab them, drink and stow them again with one hand while riding. The best solution for easily carrying large amounts of water is a hydration pack, but they're definitely not for everyone. (Not me either; I can't stand riding with that much weight on ...


1

The bottle size could be connected more from the road cycling than touring. In you tube videos you could see people loading up to 10 Liters of water. Another factor to take in account is the ambient temperature and relative moisture. Right now (july in Centralamerica), I have to drink between 2 -- 3 litters per day to be hidrated. Just think a trip under the ...


8

For a start you can get bigger cages. I use a Topeak Modula EX sometimes, which is adjustable to ⌀74 mm (also for the Modula II, with a metal clip instead of plastic). This is noticeably bigger than a standard cage, and is good for many sizes bottled water is sold in. The Modula range might include the biggest bottle holders: the Modula Java is meant for ...


23

Inertia. Bottles are about that big because that's how big bottle cages are, because that's how big bottles are.... repeat. Another cause is that a 10cm bottle would be larger and harder to hold/easier to drop while riding. Most riders would drink while rolling on the bike, so its potentially bumpy, with a layer of sweat/sunscreen/rain making things a bit ...


9

One reason is the industry measures weight savings in $10's/gram - water heavy, ergo it is expensive. Cyclists tend to plan to refill with water on route if they need large amounts. A couple of typical bottles gives around 2 litres - large enough for a days riding for 95% of riders, of the remaining 5%, 4.5% use a bladder. This means the market for a ...


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