15

Providing the 7900 is the same, I’m sure it is but someone more qualified can chip in if it’s different. How did it fall out ? Shimano have a proper tool for removing them. Info from here Fawkes


10

Rotors can and do bend, subtly. Have you checked it's flat? One of mine sounds flat (or rather doesn't sound) cold, but has a high enough spot when hot to sing. Have you checked for play in your wheel bearings? That can cause rotors to touch especially when cornering. Even if the rim is a little out of true, that won't affect the rotor, which is rigidly ...


9

pumping worked to no avail-which usually works This is ringing alarm bells for me - it implies you encounter brake fade on a semi regular basis. This is almost certainly down to poor braking technique (dragging the brakes excessively). You need to learn to let the bike pick up speed and then brake hard for a short period and repeat. This approach gives ...


7

The pressures necessary in any disk brake setup are extremely high, many in excess of 2000psi [SRAM 4234 Rev A(2012), p4] so require a spirally-wound fiber core reinforcement to function. Because this fiber reinforcement core can never be clear, even if the fibers were themselves clear such as glass (which is a common fiber used) you will not find any that ...


7

You may have a hard time finding someone to tell you exactly what's under there in terms of the architecture and what part bears how much load, since replacement parts aren't available to service or replace the master cylinder on these. I'm going to make an educated guess here based on having done a master cylinder replacement on a road lever that parts ...


6

That specific item is called an e-clip and it would usually go around something round to hold it in place. I would not use the bike until you figure out where it should go as the brakes will probably not work properly without it.


6

Tying everything said in various answers and comments together: Shimano calls the item in question an e-ring, but Kibbee says e-clip may be the more general term. As stated by Kibbee and Criggie, e-rings usually hold something like a post in place. And it appears that the e-ring is linked to a post that holds the lever blades in place (these are the things ...


6

edit: The only XTR calipers that used the appropriate banjo bolt for your Saint brake were part of the m960 series, which was released in the early 2000s and had integrated brake/shift controls (push the brake lever sideways to pull shift cable). these levers used the BH96 hose, which is equivalent stiffness to BH-59 and also had a banjo fitting at the lever....


6

There is a good chance that mix of soaps is leaving a residue on the rotors and that is collecting on the pads and fouling them. If that soap residue is your problem, then it's also possible that the heat from use is helping performance, but it's not burning the soap away completely. Whenever you're having a problem with brake power or excessive noise, the ...


6

The risk is that you'll need to spread the pads before you can re-insert the wheels. You can get disc-brake spacers to keep the pads separate for transport, and I recommend using them.


5

The self-adjustment is a valid concern. The way that's implemented is through the drag and elasticity of the piston seals. Holding those seals in the extended position for long periods could lead to gradual elastic deformation of the piston seals (reducing their ability to retract). It could also result in the seals gradually creeping back down the piston ...


5

It's at your own risk, doesn't always work, and may be a waste of time, but burning it out is the way to go if you have to do it. Looking past the global northy sort of time/money/risk/hassle equation, it's a pretty reasonable fix. I have no idea what the potential ill effects on braking power or trustworthiness of the pad material might be, but this ...


5

This sounds like a classic case of pad contamination. You are well advised to try to determine the cause to avoid it happening again. My first suspicion would be your washing process. How did you wash the bike? Is it possible you got a cleaning product on the pads? I'd definitely inspect the calipers very carefully to make sure you do not have any leaks. ...


5

There could be a few possible issues here: 1: You’re not tightening the bolts enough. Take the bike to a bike shop, or even a car garage, and have them torque the bolts down properly with a torque wrench. Additionally, make sure to use threadlocker on the bolts, which is a special type of glue that prevents them from loosening due to vibrations. 2: Your bike’...


5

The symptoms you are describing seems to be a "Ghost Leak" - Rides of Japan terms it this way. It might actually just be a kink in the hydraulic hose. His symptoms are similar. Squeezing the brake feels powerful, but holding on to it will eventually cause the hydraulic pressure to release. Once he lets go of the brake lever, and squeeze it again, ...


5

First, I'm sorry you had what sounds like a nasty crash. I've been there, a couple of years ago and it's no fun. I'd be looking hard at the pads. In my case it was mechanical disc brakes so there was no fluid to boil, and the descent was so steep and twisty there wasn't time to let the brakes cool much they were resin-bonded ceramic pads (sold as simply &...


5

This is something that I have been experiencing as well. With my bike upside down, I had a light on the ground and could peak through the caliper as the disc spun with the wheel. I could see that the rotor was moving closer and then further from the pad. Aha, I thought, the rotor is warped. But then by chance I noticed something else. The whole wheel would ...


4

It's possible someone might randomly know, but for the most part that's not how this game works. Bleed fitting typology on random OEM type hydros is chaos. There are no resources. It's not all the same within brands. It's figured out by having a variety of options when you crack it open. When you take out the bleed screw, look at the diameter, pitch, ...


4

I know it’s an old question, but I just received my bleeding kit, and I was wondering the same thing. I looked up ‘syringe’ on Amazon, all of them have markings saying ‘discard after use’ or ‘single-use only’, regardless of their intended purpose, including some where the description clearly states that they’re reusable, like the ones meant for cleaning a ...


4

I had the same issue -- brake pistons not retracting. Issue ended up being "crumbled" piston -- the undersurface of the piston had broken in to small pieces. Here are some photos: [


4

(How to brake properly on your MTB | Brake Power Meter) Key stats from the video: On a 1km trail with 122m elevation loss, average braking power (while using the brakes, not averaged over the entire ride) was 441 watts for a novice rider, and 643 watts for an advanced rider. Peak braking power was close to 2000 watts for either rider. The total energy ...


4

What is the relative difference between hydraulic and cable actuated disc brakes? What is the relative difference between hydraulic and cable actuated rim brakes? Generally speaking - hydraulic brakes offer more modulation. There's more "hand-feel" between the initial bite and through to full-on braking. Whether its disk or rim is less important ...


4

Concur with Kibbee - These are often used to retain a post or pin so they can't slide out. These clips are not load bearing, but they stop a load-bearing axle/pin from moving. I'd suspect it is from the pivot's shaft, so if your main pin moved/bound up then your braking would be compromised. You're looking for a groove in a round part, something like ...


4

There is no distinction between mechanical and hydraulic in terms of rotor compatibility per se. The manufacturer may be trying to get at something else in a clumsy and arbitrary way. They could be saying it's a direct replacement for the rotor that comes in some other brake set they produce, or they could be falsely equating mechanical brakes with using ...


4

Although this question is the first I've heard of Rhino Goo, upon doing a little online research it seems anyone who uses the stuff simply raves at it's power and looks of their ride after using it. Apparently it's Earth friendly and will not harm paint. Anecdotal reports of it's use on hydraulic brake calipers mention only it's outstanding performance and ...


4

One possibility: if the pads are really worn, it could be the case the brake disc is not touching the pads but rather the pad spreading spring. My experience with hydraulic disc brakes in general is that very minor inaudible pad rub is inevitable, contrary to rim brakes where it can be avoided. To offer any decent amount of braking, disc brakes must have ...


4

There should be no problem turning your master cylinders upside down for a short time. I've found that the worst thing that happens is that it might take a bit of pumping action after you right the master cylinders to get them working as expected again but generally even that is not needed. If there is air in the system it can require bleeding but you'd ...


3

which spec are you looking at? source/link? I cannot find any reference to that part number online. the correct part number is Y-0C6-98030, which is two characters away from your non-existent part number https://si.shimano.com/api/publish/storage/pdf/en/ev/ST-R8070/EV-ST-R8070-4248B.pdf this is for current D-A/Ultegra levers https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-...


3

Seeing the pistons extended a little is expected on hydraulic disc brake calipers. As the pads wear fluid is slowly drawn from the reservoir and the pistons extend to take up the space left by the pad wear. The pistons should retract slightly when the lever is released to back the pads off the rotor though. It sounds like that failed to happen with your ...


3

We have to assume, as you haven't provided a photo, that the frame has the attachment points for disc brakes already -- certain bikes have a provision for rim and disc brakes and yours could be one of them. It is unlikely that you will find a disc - compatible hub with the same "flange" dimesions as your current ones. This is where the spokes are ...


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