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10

Let it air dry (and/or wipe it dry as much as you can) and move on with your life. Don't put it near a heater, cause that isn't good for the rubber stuff. Re-lube the chain. What gets you in winter is not so much the snow/ice, but the salt (which doesn't affect your bike if its just standing there). In this case, if you have the time and space to bring the ...


9

You can avoid this problem altogether with studded tires The pattern is deep enough so that it grabs quite well on the snow, and the studs give you a very good grip on ice and hard snow. On uniformly flat ice, the grip is almost as good as asphalt. If the tires are good, you can wear them for all winter season, even if there is no ice. The studs are not ...


8

Another category to search can be "bikepacking bike with drop bars". Examples I can think about: the Decathlon Riverside Touring 920 (not sure it will be available in North America though), Salsa Cutthroat or Salsa Fargo These are 29er with 2.4 inches wheels, drop bar and no suspension. As said, these are bikepacking bikes, so designed to be loaded ...


6

It's kind of goofy and requires a bit of time to do, but you can zip tie your wheels to make snow wheels. While they aren't reusable if you remove them, it's a fairly cheap method. Here's a brief overview/guide. And then I went and found these too. They are supposed to work with all brake systems. As far as the socks go, I couldn't find anything smaller ...


6

I'd look at which situations you are encountering tire slips in. If you are encountering tire slips in cornering, studs are probably the way to go (or much more conservative riding). If you are having trouble while you are braking, you may consider adjusting your technique to be much more rear brake heavy or rear brake alone. I find that no matter what I ...


6

They are likely freezing because water is getting into the space between cable outer (cable housing) and the cable inner (the wire brake cable). Water expands as it freezes, in doing so it takes up more space than is available in an otherwise the restricted system. Because the cable housing is relatively inflexible to expansion (it needs to be otherwise ...


5

Having ridden both on a lot of ice for years, I'll answer that most of the fatbikes I have ridden tend to be more stable on ice than a MTB. The wider your tires are (and at lower pressure) the less likely that the wheel will slip (side to side) easily. Riding on snow and ice are very separate things. Snow is actually very easy to ride provided it is ...


5

Is the term "gravel" today already tied to, say, 700c-38, and precludes such a lavish size? That's definitely not true of most gravel bikes launched in, from my (imperfect memory), 2018 to present. Of course, gravel bikes are a new and evolving market segment. There are gravel bikes out there with clearance for not more than 40mm tires, although ...


5

I got myself studded tires when my commute had ≈150 m elevation difference which went through a narrow valley with a grade of 15 - 20 %. I'm in western/central Germany, so temperature stays around freezing point most of the winter: lots of frost cycles, meaning thawing during the day, water running on the road and freezing there in the night a period of ...


3

After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...


3

Yaktrax and simila all increase the risk of a tangle. However, one must test with your specific shoes, cleats and pedals to see how high the risk of entanglement is. That risk must then be evaluated against the risk of slipping when dismounted. Another alternative is to use studded shoes. They are harder to use together with toe clips than normal shoes ...


3

I haven't been in an organization that would have considered arranging such event and then decided not to, so this is pure speculation. I have a guess with two reasons: weight and competing activities. First, winter camping requires much more equipment than summer: heavy sleeping bags, warm clothing, fuel, and taken to extreme a tent with stove. These are ...


2

The real issue with ice is that it has a very low coefficient of friction, and weight distribution won't change that enough to make a difference. Tires with a soft compound and a lot of siping help somewhat, but the best solution is a tire with metal studs.


2

When I lived in Ithaca New York, I used tire chains for my RockHopper mountain bike. It made going down the steep slope of Buffalo Street in the dead of winter a bit less terrifying. This brand is called SlipNot but there are others on the market as well. The advantage of chains is that they can be taken off in the Spring. The disadvantage is that you have ...


2

My winter commute tends to be in a well protected velomobile, so I often ride in a light pullover and jeans, socks, and my cycling shoes - and no other layers - in near-freezing temperatures. The inside of the velomobile cabin warms up nicely after the first kilometer.


2

All brake types that lock your wheels work. Because traction is required to stop you, spend more on better studded (ice) tires, because once your wheels are locked your tires will help you stop/not. Hydraulic brakes are overhyped. They are more prone to failure when tested in salty conditions due to more small moving parts that can corrode. Mechanical ...


2

Possible names for the category of "gravel bike that can accommodate 29″×2.25″ tyres": Drop-bar mountain bikes Rigid mountain bikes (if the stress is on avoiding all suspensions, rather than on using dropbars)


2

I thought this was quite an interesting question. There are bikes and framesets available to take such big tyres but they are usually for flat bars. If you wanted to build a drop bar gravel bike, you could but with some caveats. I'm using two bikes I'm familiar with to give an example, there are plenty of other choices. A frameset like the Surly Ogre ...


1

As others have pointed out studded tires are most effective against ice. As for weight on front wheel, yes it is important to have some. But you do not want to lean heavy and make your hands heavy and stiff. You want them to be light, quick to react and precise. You also want your upper body to be flexible and quick to react.


1

Wheel size probably doesn't matter that much, the one that would probably perform better is the wider one with more aggressive tread or the one with studs. However, once you get to a certain width (I'd say above 3.0) then tires can start to more easily wash out sideways on wet snow, which I get on my fat bike regularly, but not so much on my 29er or 27.5+ ...


1

My bike was outside all of ten hrs, and when I got on it I couldn't go any where!. My chain was so cold it was just sliding around the cassette. I had to walk home from work. So when I eventually arrived home I poured hot water over the chain and cassette. It done the trick, but it happened again. Its a pain!


1

Zap straps/cable ties are useless. Try using bike chain. Deflate tire, put chain around tire and rim. Do the same around tire. Reinflate tire with air, and ride.


1

A word of warning on Internal Gear Hubs with coaster brakes: You IGH won't last long. You see, in internal gear hubs without a coaster brake, the gears are lubricated by oil. In IGHs with inbuilt coaster brake, the whole thing is lubricated with a grease that can stand high temperatures. Use simple logic: will the high-temperature grease be ideal for low ...


1

Back when I was healthier I rode my bike year-round here in ("tropical") southern Minnesota, commuting 10 miles to work and back. Because I didn't have studded tires I never rode when the roads were icy, and I drew the line at riding in below 0F temps, but otherwise I rode in rain, falling snow, when the roads were wet, et al. My bike was a Nishiki tourer ...


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