Hot answers tagged

19

As other have commented it appears to be based a legal opinion. While there is no physical reason they would not work the safety side says having sharp pins sticking out would not be a good idea. The potential for someone to strike a shin against the pedal warrants the warning.


13

My indoor exercise cycle specifically cautions against using pedals which are not designated as being strong enough for indoor cycles. Supposedly, the stresses put on pedals on exercise bikes are greater than those on real bikes.


13

Probably due to the fact that many indoor bikes, particularly spin bikes, are fixed wheel inc. a heavy flywheel which is why they always have toe-clips and/or clip in pedals - to make sure foot says on the pedal. If your foot slipped off with pinned flats, the pedals will still be whizzing round and then potentially cause an injury. Here's an extract from a ...


9

I believe this has nothing to do with the pins, or with any special mechanical stress that indoor cycling involves. In my opinion the issue is the possibility of corrosion due to sweat. Indoor bikes get a lot more sweat on them because they don't move. It's a huge problem that can quickly ruin components and even create the possibility of a sudden and ...


8

The standard hub width for road wheels with QR is 130mm for non disc and 135mm for disc hubs. Even though you can force the frame to clamp around narrower hub, it is strongly recommended to add spacers to the axle to adjust the width. As mentioned in comments, if you have hydraulic brake it's best to insert a spacer between brake pads so that you do not ...


7

On Shimano SPD pedals, you can sometimes adjust the tension for how tightly they clip in (likely via a hex bolt). If the tension is too low, your feet will be too easy to pop out, whereas if its too high, you won't easily be able to get out (which isn't a problem on an indoor cycling setup). Try playing with this setting to see if you stay clipped in (...


7

Based (very roughly) on this calculator here, I'll guess 28 km/h or less. Using a 0 weight rider and bike with no wind and 200 watt output you get roughly the speed you are getting on the trainer (the weights are used for rolling resistance). Leaving the power the same and changing to 80kgs, a 9kg bike and 15 km/h wind it gives 28 km/h which is a ...


7

Try a Garden Centre, they usually sell a range of trays and they should have something suitable. An example would be this "Giant Plus Garden Tray" which at 120cm x 55cm should be big enough to place a bike on.


7

You can basically use any trainer with a powermeter (I would call it a "smart trainer" but others do protest too much). The cheapest ones start at 200€, better ones, with a more accurate power meter, say 300€. There is no need to have a powermeter on your bike. These trainers are not that much more expensive than the copletely dumb ones. You are ...


6

Most information appears to have vanished from the official website, but other specifications suggest it's just a 12V power plug. I've tested a universal power supply and 12 V, 1 A turned out to work fine with the Cybex 700. The correct plug was the green one in this model (6.3*3.0 mm).


5

Should be possible, but you are going to need a lot of dedication to sitting for hours on the trainer. You'll also need to put a trainer specific or cheap disposable tire on you bike as trainers wear rear tires fast. The training you need to do depends on what your level of fitness is, the max distance you can currently ride and the nature of the 180km ...


4

I use a few cardboard boxes taped together with gaffer's tape. The tape is waterproof. 2 layers of cardboard (staggered at edges if you're using small boxes) is plenty to make it through a season. Use the box edges up against a wall to prevent splatter. If you have uneven floors and the water rolls off of the boxes, fold an edge over to cause it to be ...


4

Generally, not much. You need to look at the manufacturer's wheel size ratings and the hub widths allowed, along with the type of the axle (e.g. if you have a maxle, you'll need a special replacement maxle). If you're still not sure, contact the manufacturer. If you have a standard width hub (130 to 135 mm, which you have), and 26 or 700c wheels (which ...


4

Consider constructing a parachute similar to those worn by sprinters: https://www.amazon.com/SKLZ-Speed-Chute-Resistance-Acceleration/dp/B002CLK21C This would generate significant drag at moderate speeds. Just be sure not to get it tangled up in the rear wheel! Perhaps install an emergency release to avoid getting tangled yourself. It's been discussed ...


4

This problem has been solved by many intrepid flatlanders, just tow an old car tyre.


4

This is possibly a duplicate of Training for 150 km race in 2 months practicality and plan , so you can still follow the advice in those answers to good effect. There are some advantages with a trainer because you can control the effort you make on the indoor trainer, and target specific goals with more structure. There are lots of training plans published ...


4

I'll answer in a very general sense. For virtual cycling, the program or app needs to know how fast you are going. This is a function of what power you are producing. The simplest solution is to have some sort of power meter on the bike or on the trainer. These typically sense the torque you generate (i.e. how much you twist some part of the bike, e.g. the ...


3

After listening to advice from @Carel, I warmed the tyres up for 20 minutes, a lot more than I would have envisaged, and I finally got consistent results being able to calibrate more than once. After a bit of slackening, I managed to calibrate to the centre of the green zone. I can't wait to re-do the whole process after my training tyre arrives! A quick ...


3

As your description implies that you'll be spending a lot of your time building up speed (i.e. stop-start riding), adding weight will add a fair bit of resistance. Ideally you'd fit 4 panniers with something like 10-20kg in each, plus something on the frame, but unless you've got a touring bike you probably won't be set up to carry that much (my touring ...


3

Your bike would like the same conditions as you yourself would like - room temperature air and humidity. Also bikes dislike being left salted - if your location salts the roads then rinsing this off after your ride is an excellent idea to preserve If space is an issue, there are several solutions for small spaces. If you have space up high then there are ...


2

It's not the temperature changes that cause rust, but humidity, especially in combination with salt. Let the bike dry completely whenever possible. I store my steel bike indoors both at work and at home (in unheated but above zero garages), and try to avoid salted roads (which is not always possible). It easily survives the winter. It also depends on the ...


2

Most modern bicycle components will withstand an amazing amount of variation. I do, however, recommend that you allow time for the bike to dry in between taking it out and keep the bike as free as possible from salt and grime (which will accelerate wear of your components). As background, I have had several commuter bikes that regularly go between a 70F ...


2

On the cheaper side, a tarp or a vinyl tablecloth should do the trick, and be more easily tidied away and stored. Even a decent-weight shower curtain!


2

I bought a set of Cyclops rollers a few years back and it was scary to say the least when I started riding on them. I too was trying the door-frame technique, but I felt it to be dangerous in case I fell and could not grab onto the door frame in time! So I simply watched a few videos on YouTube and learned the best way was to start riding with the rollers ...


2

I never wash any of my bikes with water. Water, specially at high pressure out of a hose may get to places it shouldn't (i.e. bearings) and thus reduces the life expectancy of your bike. Personally, I don't have a lot of space inside, and this works perfectly fine: let your bike dry completely scrub off all bigger chunks of dirty with an old dry cloth use ...


2

@Batman has already explained how to adjust SPD release tension (+1 to him). Pedalling smoother will also help. Try to use you ankles more, so that you are trying to drive the pedals through all 360°. And try to pedal straight, as in keep your feet pointed directly forward all the time. Keeping your knees straight can help with this, and focussing on a ...


2

I keep a piece of thick PVC foil, about 3×1 m in size which I spread on the floor in my corridor and put my bike on it (it has a kickstand so it can stand on its own). I spread 4-5 sheets of newspaper just below the bike. I take the chain off (which is easy since I have a master link) and clean it by shaking in a bottle of naphta. I dust off all dried dirt ...


2

Here are a couple of options I can think of. If you have access to some lumber and some blocks, you could build some ramps to provide you with a bit of incline to give you extra resistance. This won't be much, but since the lot sounds like it's not that big it could be better than nothing. You could also possibly make do with any such inclines you might ...


2

A minor point is that with no brake available for your roller session, the rear wheel will take longer to stop. That's going to be totally fine most of the time, but if you have pets or children, keep them away from the spinning bits because there's no good way to stop it quickly. Perhaps running the resistance slightly higher might mitigate this slightly.


2

After a long bike tour through south east Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia totaling ~5000 km) we were flying back to NZ with our bikes. NZ customs has very stringent requirements that no dirt/bugs/diseases comes in to the country on used sports gear, so we got the bikes sparkling clean by smuggling them up to our hotel room and putting them into the ...


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