35

CO2 charger cartridges are used for bike tire inflation because they are a common, inexpensive product that has been around since the 1950s. Their other uses include powering air guns and inflating life vests. They were originally developed by the Crosman Corporation and marketed under the name "Powerlet". Powerlet cartridges are filled with CO2 presumably ...


26

I believe you will find these articles informative: The hidden life of a CO2 cartridge [PDF] The CO2 Cartridge … an Under-Appreciated Marvel of Technology! — George Fox Lang [PDF] At room temperature (below the 31°C/87.8°F critical temperature) a CO2 bottle is to a practical extent self-regulating. This is not possible with simple compressed air. You ...


21

The ideal gas law (which is a good approximation in this case) says PV=nRT where P is pressure, V is volume, n is mols of gas, R is the ideal gas law constant, and T is temperature in Kelvin. Thus, solving for n, we see n = (PV)/(RT). Then, assuming air is made up of {gas1, gas2,...} with fractions {p1,p2,...} (so p1+p2+...=1) and corresponding molar ...


20

Those valve stems are too short for those deep deep rims you've got on there. You can tell just from the photos that the valve stem isn't sticking out far enough from the rim for the pump to fit all the way on it. Hence, it's not contacting the valve enough for you to inflate your tires.


19

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus (...


16

It sounds like your pump is not on the valve properly, so instead of inflating the tire you're just pressurizing the inside of your pump. Does your bike have Schrader valves (the kind you see on a car) or Presta valves (skinnier, with a kind of pointy top)? If it has Presta valves, make sure the top of the valve is unscrewed. There's a little nut that you ...


13

Inflator heads with Presta fittings let you do this because they tend to (always?) seal down around the stem, not the core. I don't know any other way. I suppose you could also take a spare Presta core from a dead tube, break the plunger out of it to get more airflow, then temporarily install it in your tubeless valves and put your adapter on that. This is ...


13

The culprit is the rim tape. The glue that holds it in place has lost its grip, and when the tube is inflated, the tape is pushed away and lets the tube to extend into spoke hole. Eventually the edge of the spoke hole cuts the tube with the results that you described. In my experience, this is what cloth rim tapes do. They can be replaced and there are ...


11

To calculate the weight of a gas you need the volume, pressure and temperature. A bike tyre is a torus (doughnut) with volume given by the formula: V=(πr^2)(2πR) where R is the radius of the wheel and r is the radius of the tyre. For a 700c25 tyre, R will be 311mm and r will be 12.5mm that gives a volume of 9.59×10^5 cubic millimetres or 0.000959 cubic ...


10

You're really asking two questions here: 1) Do road tires lose air more quickly? And 2) Do tubeless tires lose air more quickly? First off, let's talk about the different ways that tires can (and do) lose pressure. Obviously, they can lose pressure through a poor seal, either on the valve or where the tire seats to the rim on tubeless tires. Tires also ...


10

Unless the tire bead (the re-enforcing wire around the edges) is damaged your tire is simply not seated on the rim properly near the valve and has popped off as the tube was inflated. Tube size seems OK. 32/47 possibly means it's compatible with 32-47mm tires. If it's about the same as your old tube that it's OK. Deflate the tube and re-seat the tire. It'...


10

TLDR: The pressure you put into the bottle is NOT the pressure to which you inflate the tyre. The pressure drops down as the volume increases when you connect the bottle with the tyre. The final pressure you inflate your tyres to is mostly personal. There are some guidelines but depend on many details about the terrain and the tyre properties. You ask for a ...


8

Sorry to revive an old thread, but I have the same wheelset. At first, I was losing up to half the pressure withing 12 hours. I started with 1 ounce of sealant in each tire. After a week, I added another ounce, and the tires lost maybe the same amount over a 24 hour period. Not bad, that is the rate for my latex tubulars But lately, the front tire is now ...


8

The short version: Yes, they are feasible. The long version: You can do a minor adjustment of my answer in this question by changing the molar masses involved. The molar mass of carbon dioxide is 44.01 g / mol. The ideal gas law says PV=nRT, where P is pressure, V is volume, R is the ideal gas constant and T is temperature (in an absolute scale, e.g. ...


8

This explains part of the reason in what may be too much detail:http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch4/deviation5.html If you're going to read any of it, read the material starting after the table listing "van der Waals Constants for the Various Gases". It calculates that compressing CO2 from 1 Liters to 0.2 Liters using the Ideal Gas Law (...


8

I don't know what kind of air pump you were using at the gas station. If it was a manual one with just a pressure gauge attached, you can usually use them if you are careful enough. Automatic air pumps, however, usually have the habit of using this three step algorithm: 1) open the valve to fill some air for a fixed amount of time, 2) measure the effect, 3) ...


7

I'd change it for a better tire, one that's much tighter on the rim. You inflated out to only 15 psi over its maximum. That kind of force could easily be generated in a quick turn with the brakes on. If the tire blows off in such a scenario, then you'll be underneath the vehicle you were trying to avoid. Go to your LBS, and explain that you want a ...


7

Those strings are quite common with continental tires and seem to be a part of their manufacturing process. Every continental tire I have owned seem to have some of those threads, even ones that mounted relatively easily. I just cut them off and have never had an issue with them. Continental tires are also well known for their tight beads. The high-pressure ...


7

It's not 100% clear from your pictures and description, but it appears that the rim failed at the outer radius of the "working" portion of the brake surface. This is consistent with failure due to rim wear, a relatively rare condition only because few bikes are used enough to wear out the rims. How many miles do you have on the bike? Have the brakes been ...


6

Road tires have higher pressure with lower volume, and both of those properties are going to cause them to lose air more quickly than a lower pressure, higher volume tire, tubeless or not. With that in mind, it may be the case that the tire needs a little more sealant. The stuff has to squeeze around not only throughout the casing of the tire, but also ...


6

For shorter stem presta valves in deep rims the trick to fill air is to first deflate the tyre about 50%, then push the pump head onto the stem with one hand while at the same time pushing the stem through the rim from the tyre side with your other hand. Then use the lever to get a good seal. When you pump it up, the increase in pressure in the head of the ...


6

Buy a floor pump, also known as a track pump, instead of an automotive accessory. A track pump will take about the same time to top up your tires as a small car compressor, and has an advantage of not needing electricity at all. You still need the on-bike pump for punctures while riding, but in the garage at home a track pump works very well. I ended up ...


5

According to the people at Scott, the general weight limit for a rider is 110 kg. You are significantly above this, so the manufacturer doesn't necessarily support you on that. The wheels durability depends a lot on who built them and how well they were built and if they have taken any damage. You are in a YMMV (and at your own risk) range by sticking with ...


5

A shock pump is designed to fill a very small volume of space with very high air pressures. A tire pump is designed to fill a large volume of air, to relatively low pressures, pretty quickly. You can technically fill a schrader valve tube using a shock pump, but because the volume of air for each repetition of the pump will be so low, it might take a week ...


5

With regard to your question over potential weight savings, I quickly weighed the kit that I normally use to give a comparison. The mini pump that I carry from Lezyne comes in at 83g (has some subtle modifications to stop it rattling); whereas the two unbrnaded 16g CO2 cannisters that I carry come in at 118g and require a chuck to use which is another 21g. ...


5

When in doubt, it's much easier to just completely replace the inner tube. They are consumable (like brake pads) and will only cost you a couple of pounds/dollars. This can be annoying and tricky at first but after a few tries should only take 5-10 minutes or so. In my opinion, it's easier and quicker to just buy new tubes the next time you're passing a ...


4

"Remove valve cap, unscrew thingy in valve, and tap it a little - a jet of air shoots out. OK." You've got that right. If you have the proper pump, and the chuck is working properly, then simply pushing the chuck on and flipping the lever should do it. Normally, when you press the chuck on far enough a little button in the middle of the chuck will press ...


4

That appears to be a standard flip-up chuck, and it claims to be "universal". If using on a Schrader valve you just push it on and flip up the lever. If using on a Presta valve you unscrew the knob on the Presta valve first, then push on and flip up the lever. With some of these you need to not push the chuck quite all the way on if using on Schrader. On ...


4

Yes you did something wrong. You are supposed to put the tube in the tire and mount it on the rim. If you inflate a balloon you will see similar behavior. After you have stretched a tube IN the tire the behavior outside the tire will change slightly.


4

It turns out the tyre wasn't fine; here it is 2000km later. The tyre has split in two places on one side, and the bond between the bead and the sidewall looks pretty compromised all the way around. Thankfully it didn't blow out while I was on the bike!


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