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29

A fit person can do 50km without too much difficulty, though they'll probably be sore from the effort if they don't cycle much, just because cycling uses different muscles to, say, running. It wouldn't be easy, but it wouldn't be too hard. It sounds like you're not very fit. If you were determined, you could probably make it around 50km but I doubt it ...


25

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


19

In "Epidemiology of bicycle injuries and risk factors for serious injury" by Frederick P Rivara, Diane C Thompson, and Robert S Thompson, the authors gave a questionnaire to 3,390 bicycle riders who had attended a hospital emergency department in the Seattle area. They found that cyclists involved in a crash at a speed greater than 15 miles per hour were 1....


19

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


17

There are devices that allow a bicycle to be modified to make it easier and safer to ride with one arm. Riding safely would come with practice and confidence. Trikes or recumbents mentioned in the comments offer a safe alternative also. The key modification needed for a bike is a steering damper. The damper adds resistance to steering by way of a spring ...


14

It's probably not a great idea. Start with a shorter route and see how you do. Pick a flat route without hills. Make sure you have a bail out and a way to get home (public transport, a friend, Uber etc.). You probably should get a bike shop to have a look over your bike for any issues, you don't want to get stranded by something going wrong or have any ...


13

Thankfully I never ride without gloves. The light weight gloves with padded leather in the palms is all you need - they are cheap, comfortable and effective - what more could you ask for. I had a crash after my bike was tampered with and the front wheel fell off. I am a programmer, and although I emptied the company first aid kit of dressings, and could not ...


12

Generally speaking your off hand should be the front brake, so if you're right handed the front brake should be the left. They can be set up either way, though, especially if you're using cable-driven (non-hydraulic) brakes. Even with hydraulics you should have no problem making the right hand brake the rear. I would highly advise this, as in a panic ...


11

The Wikipedia entry for Iliotibial band syndrome suggests that some of possible causes may be Inadequate warm-up or cool-down Excessive up-hill and down-hill running Positioning the feet "toed-in" to an excessive angle when cycling This IT Band Pain Stretches, Treatment And Prevention article suggests "Having a properly fitted bike can help triathletes who ...


11

I would probably try a simple Roadster (or as I know them a "Dutch bike" or „Hollandrad“): internal gear hub with back-pedaling/coaster brake (ex. Shimano's 8 speed Nexus) normal brake leaver for the front stable geometry You will have to train to use the back brake, and try out a few "emergency" stops somewhere safe. These bikes aren't built to be fast ...


11

To answer your questions - "Is it possible to do 50 km distance without any previous training? - Yes, it is possible, assuming by no previous training you mean cycling training. If a person has been active in running or other aerobic activity using their legs it is possible to ride 50 km without any previous bicycle training. In your situation it may be ...


10

Some people never do. In races, people push to the limit, and sometimes past it. And people make mistakes. So there will always be crashes. It's part of race craft to learn to read the corners and your competitors, to know when to make sure you are ahead or inside the risky riders. At this early stage of your career many of the riders you are riding ...


9

This seems like a question of how to get you mojo back. As eloquently put by andy256, some never get over being spooked. I know the feeling well. Even a near misses can spook. I can't tell you how frightened I was years back lining back up to restart a race, after seeing a number of people I trained with being carried away on a stretchers (the course ...


9

Since having a car-on-bike accident last year due to me performing an Idaho stop, and the driver not stopping at all, I feel like my riding habits have changed a lot, and I realized how bad other people's riding habits tend to be. I don't always put my foot down when getting to an intersection, but I usually come to a stop and do a trackstand for a split ...


8

You ask about danger, when/where to use, and when/where not to use, so...: There's the danger that you forget to unclip when you stop, and fall to your side. This is a real danger, but not a serious one except if your fitness is a bit low (risk of wrist, shoulder, hip or ankle lesion). You should then practice a lot first, both clip and unclip while riding ...


8

If your commute is as up and down / stop and go as you say then I would suspect your knee problems are similar to mine. I've found through practice, and a few quick minute of research just now, that keeping your cadence (crank rotations per minute) high will help you keep from straining your knees on your ride; especially where you are making many stops, and ...


8

There is plenty of advice about gloves under the Gloves tag. See especially the question "What's the purpose of cycling gloves?" and one of the answers. From which you see that I recommend ordinary cycling gloves. Your purpose is their purpose. But I suggest that while you should be wearing gloves, you also should pay attention to how you ride, and where ...


8

A CX bike is stable, strong, and will take wider tires. It is a great road and commute bicycle. It is built to race in city parks. It has a comfortable riding position. Just put touring tires on it (I like 35mm). I don't mean to advertise a bike but if you look at a high end CX like Moots the even say use as light touring. Rout You are not going to ...


7

I have been using biking shoes with SPD cleats for nearly 20 years, and I definitely fell and got banged up as a new user of clipless pedals. I have since learned how to get in and out of them to the point where it is second nature and I hardly think about it at stoplights, etc. I find them especially valuable for damp conditions, when regular shoes would ...


7

As commented by @Daniel R Hicks the problems I would be concerned about are to his own health. The bike components that will wear out prematurely are simpler to replace. Potential health issues are knee problems from "mushing" all the time. MTBer's tend to run lower cadence than road riders, for valid reasons, but when on the road tend to run closer to ...


7

I’ve been riding with one arm for about twenty five years without problems. I have had many bikes (mainly old bikes with the front brake removed) and a few electric bikes again with no problem. I stay on the road. My current bike is a Felt Cruiser with back-pedal rear brake, normal front brake, and twist gears. Luxury! My biggest problem is hand ...


6

Plain black coffee would be okay; it's just water and it should be nearly sterile. However, I would definitely avoid coffee that contains milk, sugar or other additives that can support bacteria growth. Now, this is going to come as a bit of a surprise, but what is an excellent wound cleanser is urine. Yeah, yeah, I know. But other than the ewwww ...


6

As far as I know, in any vehicle, there is a direct relationship between speed and severity, statistically speaking, with "lots" of studies showing that. This also applies to being hit, or front-to-front crashes. There's even the term "high-energy-trauma", applied by health professionals to injuries involving high energies, for example high kinetic energies. ...


6

Crits are scary as hell. Road racing in general is scary, but crits are the scariest of the scary. I've seen some gnarly crashes and both as a racer and a spectator, and you've experienced one yourself, so kudos for wanting to get back on the saddle. Do a postmortem: Sometimes crashes happen so fast that it seems like one moment everything is fine and then ...


6

I was amazed the right is the front but found this Australian Standard AS1927 – 1998 Pedal Bicycles – Safety Requirements, page 16 Section 2.14 Braking System 2.14.2.1 states the following: Handbrake lever location: The brake lever for a front brake shall be positioned on the right-hand side of the handlebar, and that for a rear brake on the ...


6

I cycle with one hand. I’ve got hydraulic brakes, and I’ve put a hydraulic splitter inline. It takes both brakes in & a single line out & then into a single Juicy brake controller. The splitter came from a quad bike setup. I don’t find any problem with bias, nor any problems with not having enough brake fluid to shift both callipers. For gears I ...


6

You may try looking into a noseless saddle. Some of the designs I have seen actually have cutouts or the sit bones in particular. Many people are dismissive of them (myself somewhat included), but they may hopefully be an alternative for you. Here is a completely random blog entry on the interwebz comparing several. There appears to be a large range of ...


5

You'll most likely have a few light tumbles. Also, you can get "beginners cleats" for Shimano pedals. The proper name is Multi Directional Cleats and the model number is SM-SH56. These will let go if you pull really hard in any direction. I used them for around 4 months when I first went clipless. Saved me some skinned knees. After switching to Crank ...


5

There are extra risks associated with being physically attached to the pedals, however the risks are probably quite small. I found the following articles on Pubmed: Two cases of acetabular fractures sustained during competitive cycling cyclists who are attached to their pedals by straps or clips are likely to tumble with their bicycle and fall ...


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