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I've never had a problem with patching a hole based on where around the tube it was. Location only seems to be a problem if the hole is near a seam/rib, or very close to the valve stem. The techniques are Abrade the area around the puncture - that's what the sandpaper/file is for. You want to roughen it, but not thin it. Apply the solvent thinly but over ...


1

It does not matter on which side the hole is, the process is exactly the same anywhere on the tube. Be sure to let the glue became more viscous and sticky by waiting for a while before applying the patch. Wait long enough before inflating. Only if the hole is too close to the valve (milimetres), it may be impossible. But is the same anywhere else. If you are ...


2

I would see it the other way: manufacturers tend to write down critical "operating limits", if it's not clearly written in the package or in the instructions, it's likely that it's not critical (the reaction might be slower, but given the glue is not water-based, the "critical point" for temperature is unlikely to be the water freezing ...


3

I spent a few years living on a tropical island where there were all sorts of little spines and thorns in the mix of sand, dirt, twigs and wotnot off-road, I had constant problems with punctures if I strayed off the commonly used dusty paths. I tried tubeless and with inner tubes but both were very prone to flats. The best solution I came up with was with ...


2

The answer kind of depends on what compromises you are willing to make. Solid tires have a distinctively different ‘feel’ compared to traditional tires (more specifically, they generally have a different impact absorption behavior than pneumatic tires, which depending on the terrain may mean you need shock absorbers to not rattle around on the bike), ...


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It's been a long time since I've had a place I've felt comfortable biking but I grew up around thorns and found some liners that go in the tire outside the tube and were nearly perfect defense against thorns.


5

Solid tires are awful. They're slow, heavy, take away a very important rider-tuned variable (pressure), make the bike feel dead, and don't absorb shock well. It's possible to imagine a scenario where they're a reasonable choice. This would be something along the lines of a pure short-distance utilitarian cyclist who simply will not be able to deal with a ...


2

I'd recommend solid tires if you're after trouble-free riding. I've been happily using Huthchinson Serenity series for years (it has foam inserts and outer tires around them). The amount of peace against punctures it buys you is really priceless, if you really care about that. Few things to note though: It will be somewhat bumpier than an pneumatic tire. To ...


8

I suggest you buy a box of half a dozen normal tubes, carry a couple of spares, and when you've got 3 or 4 with punctures, you patch a batch in the warm and dry. It takes almost the same amount of time to patch several tubes as to patch one, because the time is dominated by waiting for glue to go tacky, and getting stuff out/putting it away. Any that are ...


11

Both approaches would help, but are very different. A solid tyre is unpunctureable, but the riding properties are much worse. Not only it is slower, but also the adhesion and the feel over uneven surface or terrain are affected. It is virtually maintenance-free. Tubeless requires regular maintenance even if you don't puncture. That maintenance is harder than ...


3

A 25mm tire is too narrow for that rim, although that's not necessarily a major part of the mounting difficulties. You will only have less slack to work with though as a result. Difficult mounting with tubeless rims is almost always the same story over and over: not enough effort made to keep the two installed beads nestled down into the middle of the rim ...


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