31

Verdict seems to be 'this is a scam' Cyclotron is a scam https://cyclotronscam.boards.net/board/1/general-discussion Reevo is suspiciously similar https://www.reddit.com/r/shittykickstarters/comments/ivk95y/reevo_hubless_ebike_anyone_know_anything_about/ Comments on there about sum it up: looks good to the gullible on Facebook/Kickstarter, in reality is much ...


20

I would think about these in terms of bearings: The hubless design moves the bearing of the wheel all the way out to its circumference. As such, you get extremely long racetracks a need for many more bearing balls/rollers the bearing balls/rollers rotate much, much quicker the seal for the bearings must be much larger the bearings are much, much closer ...


15

Here are the UCI's rules governing bikes (jump way down to 1.3). After a quick perusal, they seem to be silent on the subject of internally geared hubs or multi-gear mechanisms in general, which is surprising considering how detailed their rules on sock length are. They do, of course, prohibit multiple gears on track bikes.


12

There is no good way. One could imagine ways of contriving a low-end claw-type derailleur on. Don't do that. Nexus hubs are usually reliable. In some places in the world, there are lot running around without issue. That you've had chronic issues suggests either damage, defect, or a setup issue. Some number of Nexus and Alfine bikes have made it into the ...


11

There are a couple of likely reasons IMO. First, Shimano don't make anything like a Rolhoff and that's intentional. Shimano market strategy is all about mass sales to bike manufacturers, and expensive, complex IGH are not part of that. Even their spare parts - those sales are not a huge profit centre, but they do take a lot of staff time (even though their ...


11

Its unnecessary from a gearing range perspective and adds extra complexity, I suppose. Number of gears, number of distinct gears and gear range are all different things. Having 63 gears over the same 5.26x range that a Rohloff gives isn't much of an advantage unless you actually find the Rohloff gears are spaced too far apart (very few people do). You get ...


10

My experience as a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands: don't mess with it. If it is an Shimano, it will probably run >100.000 km. If it is a Sturmey Archer, SRAM or any other well known brand, it will mostly do >50.000 km as well. If there is a small hole for lubricant, only do this once a year or so, with some thin grease, but not oil. Oil is to thin. ...


10

Pure anecdata from my experiences. The Rohloff is substantially cheaper as well as more reliable. I don't know how long a Rohloff lasts because I haven't worn the first one out yet. Three Nexus 8 hubs failed at 5000km each. I had a Shimano Nexus 8 in a single-speed MTB fram that I commuted on for a few years. I only did about 5000km/year, the the hub only ...


10

Given that most contemporary internal gear hubs are designed to take up the entire width of a normal rear hub (135mm), there isn't space to add a rear derailleur cassette unless you have an abnormally wide rear frame. Perhaps you could try it with a fat tire bike but most regular bikes don't have the hub spacing to do this with regular IGHs. And would it ...


9

I drive the same Rohloff for over 8 years and do not see an end of its lifetime. I cannot speak for other brands, but in all posts above the free-of-charge service by Rohloff, as part of their special corporate culture was not mentioned. Up to now, whenever there was a problem, the thing was being send to Rohloff and I had to pay nothing. That being said, ...


8

I've got shimano internal hub for 5 years mainly to commute. pros: no maintenance - at the beggining easy changing at red light or to jump on the sidewalk cons: harder to change tire when flat one day a car bump my wheel: I add to change the whole wheel+internal hub after some time (3000km) some gears are screwed, so it "jumps" when I press too strongly ...


8

Oil leaking from the hub has been an ongoing problem for me too. When the bike was still new there was an oil leak from the gear changer side which went to Shimano (twice) before the internal seal was replaced (the external seal was replaced the first time to no effect. Over a year later the leak started again and this time Shimano have had the wheel for ...


7

If both bikes have a frame which is set up for it, with the long drop-out on the Thorn pictured below and the EX Box below it, then it would be the work of 5 minutes. Just unscrew (possibly by hand) that big nut on the ex-box, remove the wheel and put it onto the other bike. The only issue to remember is to always shift to the same gear (say, the lowest) ...


7

The closest to that is the Sachs DD3 "dual drive" hubs that are a 3 speed IGH with a standard cassette mount, available in 8,9 or 10 speed cassette versions. According to this site the ratios in the hub are 0.73,1,1.36 giving 1.86 between high and low gears. That's wider than a double chainring setup but narrower than most triples (a 20/30/40T triple has a ...


7

This picture shows a slightly better angle. You need to first loosen the lock nut slightly, then spin the adjuster barrel until it unscrews right off the threaded rod on the chain. When you re-assemble you reverse that, and have to re-adjust the tension so that it shifts properly.


7

Making an internally geared hub with 14 speeds that is reliable is prohibitively expensive. A Rohloff hub alone costs than most people's bicycle. It is a hard sell to most people except for a few, making it a real niche market. There was nothing like it when it first came to market (must be over 20 years now), and once there it was the instant leader of a ...


7

The chain you need is 1/8 inch chain, usually sold as singlespeed chain. A derailleur chain, which are sold as multi-speed chains, is narrower and the cogs may be too thick to fit. EDIT: As said in the other answers, some singlespeed and internal gear hubs have narrower cogs and can use the 3/32 inch chain. An 1/8 inch chain may be slightly noisier with ...


7

Unwinding the spring, as the article states, will make the hub to shift when you're going faster. Without touching the internals, the hub will shift at the same speed, no matter how high the cadence is. By changing the chainring-cog ratio you adjust the cadence at which the shift-speed is obtained. So the answer is no, there is slight difference. By doing ...


7

In the 45 minutes since I posted this question, I have developed an elegant workaround using a simple device: I stuck a pebble in the bellcrank. Most folks here probably won't be surprised by this solution, but I'll elaborate on how I came to it for the sake of future searchers who might be internal hub noobs like me. In fiddling with the push rod, I ...


7

There is a difference between the direct gear, and the default gear: The direct gear is the one that basically locks the hub's body to the sprocket. The internal gear ratio is exactly 1, and transmission losses should be minimal. The default gear is the one that gets selected when there is no shifter attached to the hub. It is selected by internal springs ...


6

It was the seal on the Alfine Hub leaking. The local service agents for Spot were able to correct the leak by tightening the external seal on the hub and cleaning everything around it. No cost. The hub is currently performing well. I'm as worried about it as I was when I made the decision to buy it, a new model of anything so complicated is likely to have ...


6

It's pretty easy if you have a spoke cutter and are willing to run a funny spoke pattern. I suggest buying (ideally second hand) a three speed hub and lacing it into the 16" rim yourself. With a wheel that small and a child on it there's not enough load to make strength an issue, so you can reasonably either lace a 20 spoke rim to a 36 spoke hub using ...


6

If the wheel is built with the appropriate rim (i.e., a rim with a braking surface) you should be fine. The hub simply has the mounts for a disc brake, one does not have to be mounted.


6

Here is how I found the answer (30-45 N-m): Followed the link in the first comment on the question (or I could have done a search for something like "shimano alfine hub service pdf"). The link Gordon provided was led to several Shimano products identified only by part number, so I did another search for "shimano alfine 11 hub" and found a listing on Amazon ...


6

The advantages of the Pinion are that the weight and complexity are in the middle of the bike and not being bounced around in the hub of the rear wheel, especially for a bike with suspension (the unsprung weight is lower). Also, because it sits in a custom housing it can be whatever size and shape they want, rather than being constrained by the width of the ...


6

In short: If chain comes off with horizontal drops (typical internal gear or single speed) the wheel has to be too far ahead. Try pulling wheel backwards until the chain can be moved <5 mm and tension the wheel properly. Other possible issues are: bent chainring or sprocket wheel not installed properly failed bearings in hub or bottom bracket Worn ...


6

Yes, the gearing should be fine. from http://www.sheldonbrown.com/nexus8.shtml the lowest ratio is 0.57 which is as low as many mountain bikes. The belt is actually wider than a metal chain and has longer life, so should be more robust: http://www.conti-drive-system.com/pages/faq/faq_en.html. But the internal hub has more moving parts, so is slightly less ...


6

A couple of months ago I did this exact overhaul and it has been running super smooth ever since. Can't comment on the longevity yet but here is the logic: Bearings: standard bearing grease, oil is too thin and will result in increased bearing wear. Brakes: "Bremsmantelfett" (brake grease) from Hanseline. Here you can probably get away with normal grease, ...


6

Decreasing the rear cog is by far the easiest of your options. On road bikes, chain rings of 34-39 teeth and rear cogs of 11 are common, so you would be within range. The force on the chain is higher for smaller chain rings, not larger ones. Slipping probably comes from not having the chain tight enough. You may be able to move the rear axle aft to ...


6

In order to understand how your gears work, it's probably useful to do a little experimenting own your own. Since you have a hub gear, switching between gears is very easy. Just move the lever while not pedalling. This is a lot simpler than a derailleur bike which requires you to pedal and takes time for the chain to move between gears. It will probably be ...


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