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31

Spinning wheels have gyroscopic effects. Whipping the bike can be a way to reposition the bike so that when it comes out of the whip, it is in an orientation that wouldn't be possible going over the jump dead-straight. This effect is large in the case of motocross. From a BMX perspective, it is very important to land on the backside of the landing ramp with ...


17

From the perspective of a competition where time matters, whipping does not serve any purpose, as it won't allow to clear a jump any faster. Scrubbing, on the other hand, allows the rider to take a lower arc and spend less time in air, at least theoretically. However, if we are talking about an event where style matters, whipping does look cool, and it ...


12

Landing on the rear wheel is a safe bet when you are not sure about the landing zone. For example a small tree root would be catastrophic if you are landing with both wheel. What happens is that since the downwards force from the fall is applied to both wheels, it is much harder to roll over the obstacle. If the front wheel cannot roll over, you basically ...


11

All those riders were doing a very specific of rear wheel landing where you land into a momentary manual (finding a balance point on the rear wheel by shifting your weight backwards and pulling on the handle bars with your arms and upper back). This lets you absorb the impact with your upper back and legs (the two biggest muscle groups in the body) as well ...


10

If your wheel is spinning hard in the air, and you apply a brake hard, the rotational momentum has to go somewhere. However your wheel is rotating forward, and stopping it will make your bike rotate so the front drops. Often that's not what you want. Also the time available is really small and your reaction time shortens the effective window too. If your ...


9

My Test To anyone curious, I tested this tactic at the local dirt jump bike park on my BMX. My BMX has only a back brake, so I have not tried yet with the front brake. It is true your bike will slightly nosedive if you grab brake in the air. How I integrated this technique into my riding I have started to use this technique if I am too back-seat in the ...


7

Jumps takes time and effort to do right. If you're going to rush or do a half-arse job then don't even bother starting. Design is important - you need to consider run up space before and run out space afterwards. Make the jump wide enough to give options - a metre would be a fair width unless you're making it difficult on purpose. Bailing-out options - ...


7

It's a trick -- it looks good on camera and would count for points accordant with degree-of-difficulty and "sticking the landing" at an adjudicated comp. The bike and rider become effectively parallel with their upright-riding stance; as opposed to perpendicular when in contact with the ground. It's also a marketing cliche in biking. Like an "ollie" or a "...


7

Some points. If you bunny hop by getting both wheels to leave the ground at the same, the rear wheel has to jump the length of the obstacle plus the length of the bike to clear the obstacle. A more modern, trialsy and BMX-y bunny hop is what is what is sometimes called an 'American bunnyhop'. In this, the front is hauled up first, then the back as the ...


7

I can't watch the video now, but there are two reasons to land on the rear wheel first: The first wheel to touch down is more likely to suffer a loss of control or traction. It's a common two wheel maxim that "most rear wheel slides recover, most front wheel slides crash", so you want that wheel to be the rear. It can help absorb the impact. Imagine the ...


7

Such fear is completely normal. Eventually you'll get over it, and even though it's different for different people there are some things you can try to help you cope with that first time. Here are some approaches I've either used myself or seen with others - in the end it mostly only comes down to what CardMechanic already answered: in case you can properly ...


6

I used to experience this when I switched from doing a lot of mountain biking to BMX - you really have to learn precisely how to absorb the impact. I thought I was doing it right until I no longer had a suspension fork. Simply absorbing with your legs isn't all there is to it. You want to land flat and carefully set the bike down. What I mean by that is ...


6

Its definitely not for stability, its a trick called "Table top". The flatter they look in the air the higher score.


6

Once you can clear a tabletop, you can clear the same size and space double. It's all about removing the mental block that says it's a different jump. It's the same jump, with a hollow middle. That's all that's different. Just get your basics down, make sure you clear it cleanly several times on the tabletop, get muscle memory going, then try it on a ...


6

From the internet: "Half Link BMX chains were designed to help dial in the chain length on frames with short dropouts and small gearing, making sure your rear wheel is exactly where you want it. Dan's Comp offers a wide variety of half-link BMX chains for both race and freestyle." Basically, you can break your chain at smaller increments to get a more ...


6

I’m assuming you have a square taper bottom bracket + crank arms? See this answer: Square taper crankset develops play after changing bottom bracket If you’ve been repeatedly riding with a loose crank arm it could be that it’s now damaged. You could try tightening with lots of torque, grease on the square taper and threadlocker (e.g. blue Loctite, but in ...


6

You have more control over weight on you than on the bike, so long as the pack is fitted nicely and doesn't bounce around too much. This doesn't just apply to jumps but all the time, as your bodyweight is part of your control but weight on the bike is passive. Imagine rolling over a tree root on a hardtail or even rigid forks. Weight attached the bike must ...


6

Indeed, the longer the ride, the better prepared you must be. The further away from help your ride takes you, the more situations you must prepare for. As a mountain bike rider who does XC (kind of), and Downhill, but also an urban rider / commuter and have made a couple long road trips, I use all modes of supply carrying, according to situation. For XC ...


5

Your assumptions are wrong. Yes, riders do extend their hands and feet just before landing, but not to make the bike work more. They do that so they can make room for the inevitable hand and feet compression which will happen when contacting the ground. If you don't extend hands and feet then you only have: 40cm absorbtion of hands and feet compression 15cm ...


5

When none of the wheels of a bicycle are on the ground, the center of mass is going to accelerate downward at approximately 9.8m/s/s and there's nothing the rider can do to significantly alter that. If both wheels touch the ground while the center of mass is at the highest possible point where that can occur, there will be a severe limit as to how much ...


5

The rather trivial answer is look at the documentation for various bottom bracket presses and see if a bushing set for the BMX Spanish type is available. For example the Park Tool BBP-1 documentation explicitly specifies that it supports the BMX Spanish type. If the Spanish BB is not listed you need a press that has an bushing set that works with a 19mm ...


5

As mentioned in another answer, the main purpose of half link chains is to have more control over the chain length and hence the wheelbase of your bike (assuming you have rear facing or slideable drop-outs). A centimetre difference in wheelbase will change the feel of the bike quite a bit, especially on a short bike like a BMX. Half link chains can only be ...


5

Its a perennial debate if you should MTB with a hydration bladder or carry everything on the bike. The single and undebatable answer is to do what works for you. Try the other way (for long enough to get used to it), and don't be scared to revisit you choices over time (applies to everything from trail/road type you ride on to you helmet). I used to climb ...


4

Landing with the rear wheel first is rarely a good idea nowadays. The video, although very "ballsy" and really of great historical importance, is very old school in regards to bike technology, terrain and rider technique. Landing with the rear first is only useful when you need to drop to flat from more than 10 feet where you need a way to absorb as much ...


4

When you land you tend to go out the front rather than the back. You pretty much never land in perfect alignment and even if you do you get pushed around. If you land front wheel first the rear wheel is going to come around and only get worse. When the rear does touch it will be out of alignment. As you absorb with your arms you only get more forward ...


4

There is no perfect all-rounder. Slopestyle bikes are basically dirt jump bikes with the suspension designed to soak the harshest of impacts. This suspension design was never thought to behave like a normal bike suspesnsion, that used to "even rough trails". Typically slopestyle riders put a lot of pressure in their air shocks to prevent bottoming out. Now, ...


4

You tagged “dirt jumping” in the question. At a jump park, I would definitely remove the backpack. At the very least, you won’t risk blowing up the water bag or breaking a tool in the (inevitable) event of a crash. For normal trail riding, it goes either way. Some people prefer the backpack, others prefer the on-bike solution. It’s really all up to you. It’s ...


3

Those teeth are severely worn, just by visual inspection. Try a new cassette, chain rings, and chain. (Don't try changing just one.) It could have been the grime that was holding the worn system together, and when you cleaned it all the play now shows up. In the future, if you replace your chain more often you can make the chain rings last longer.


3

If you watch a lot of trials riding, you'll notice they actually land with considerable more force on their rear wheels using their legs as a shock and then (sometimes even gently) touching down their front wheel. Front suspension was mainly created to maintain control on rough terrain. Trying to use your front suspension to absorb the impact of a jump ...


3

Regarding the picture: in the comment I said the rider isn't going high because of not trying hard enough, but on second thought the main reason for not being able to get proper air from such jump is that the lip is not steep enough; in fact the entire transition of that jump is rather mellow and not suited for height, you'd almost have to bunny hop out of ...


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