10

There are at least four different places you can mount a kickstand. From left to right: Orange arrow: Rear axle kickstand. These come in one-sided and two-sided varieties. The one sided are not that stable and since your bike has what looks like a child carrier, I wouldn't recommended it. Axle mount kickstands are very popular on children's bicycles: The ...


8

Nowhere is a good option. A bike can't fall over if its leaned on the ground, and in many cases you can lean a bike against a post or a tree if it needs to be kept upright. On a more serious note, kickstands can crush bicycle tubes or can interfere with the crank or some other moving part if something goes wrong. Some frames are designed with kickstands in ...


6

The specific points of damage I'd really be worried about are the hard edged dents near the junction with the bottom bracket shell lugs (red rectangle in pic below). I think there is a high probability that cracks will form from those points.


6

They're totally fine because you only use the stand when the bike is stationary. That way the stand only exerts a force on the bike when its stopped and parked. There are possible issues: If the stand acts as a washer under the axle nut, it can possibly interfere with proper seating of the nut. Notice many nuts have a serrated or textured edge to help ...


4

It's easy to design a rear kickstand for a standard steel bicycle since all you need is a strong clamp on one of the chainstays. For carbon, the clamping mechanism has to be designed carefully because it can neither compress the stays too much (carbon is fragile in compression) nor can it scratch the carbon too deeply (if the fibers fray, the whole ...


4

These are intended to clamp around the cup itself. Spindles have essentially zero spline engagement to lose. You can't really put spacers under road outboard BB cups.


4

Why bother being nice to it? Noone likes those kickstands, they are soon removed from most bikes. And many cyclists have one or more in their spares boxes! Please have a good look for a second bolt too - I've never seen one with two bolts, but yours could possibly have a second. You can also try blast the whole joint with penetrating oil like CRC or ...


4

There are a wide variety of kickstands available, my guess is you would likely be able to find one that would fit. If the frame doesn't have a crossbar and hole behind the bottom bracket for a center mount kickstand, you could likely use an adjustable rear mount, they make some that are compatible with disc brakes and this is likely what you would need. ...


4

There are several ways to mount a kickstand on a frame lacking mounts: Many aluminum frames: Aluminum bikes tend to have oval chainstays: in the vertical direction, the chainstay has a larger dimension than in the horizontal direction. This allows a kickstand mounting design where the kickstand mount consists of two curved plates that attach at both sides of ...


4

Kickstands historically mount to the underside of both chainstays, just aft of the bottom bracket. Many bike frames incorporate a stiffener plate here, with a large bolthole for a stand. You do not need this stiffener plate for a stand. Example: This stand clearly clamps an upper and lower plate around the chainstays and you can see the stiffener aft of ...


4

The groves are for any cables that are routed under the stays. Your kickstand should have come with a counter plate - B in the picture below Your kickstand is slightly different but the mounting instructions will be the same as the kickstand below ergotec Double-leg kickstand Double Flex 3 manual Bicycles without a stand plate Check if the distance between ...


4

Presumably this is the stand you have: https://www.cube.eu/en/equipment/components/kickstands/product/cube-kickstand-cubestand-cmpt-black/ You need to determine what part of the kickstand is loose and moving when you go over bumps. You can inspect the stand, but also try dropping the bike onto it's tires from 6"/10cm off the ground. That's enough to reveal ...


3

Your frame came kickstand ready. The bracket and hole are part of the frame. On your installation it appears they installed the top plate for a frame that is not kickstand ready. Not only did they use the unneeded plate but it is in the wrong place. I would remove the kickstand remove the rectangular silver colored plate. The kickstand should line up with ...


3

Kickstands are fiddly, and things tend to move unless really locked off. It's possible the bolt is loosening and the plate movement is the first symptom of loosening. To stop my bolt loosening, after adjusting everything to my liking I added a jam nut (a nut tightened against the already threaded part). This happens to be a self locking nut as that's what I ...


3

Situations when the weight of whole bike + cargo (+ maybe a rider?) is concentrated on a small patch of kickstand's clamp and when a small dynamo clamps the same seatstay are really incomparable. In the first case it's a thousand Newtons of stress applied to a piece that was not supposed to be pressed in that direction, and for dynamo it's about five Newtons ...


3

The pin needs to be pulled out. You can remove it using a wrench inserted in the kickstand for leverage to push the ring and that will loosen up the pin. If you need a visual, see this video. Hope it helps.


3

One bolt of that size wouldn't be enough for a kickstand. And, it would have to be a proprietary one and Boardman doesn't say anything about it on their site or product description for the bike. So I don't think it's anything to do with a kickstand. It could have been added to the shell (which are often a part that's designed seperately and re-used among ...


2

Pletscher and Greenfield both make decent kickstands. The most common kickstand is a single leg model that attaches just behind the bottom bracket. Pletscher also makes a double leg kickstand that mounts in the same place and Greenfield makes a kickstand they call the Stabilizer that attaches near the rear dropout on the non-drive side. The double leg ...


2

I have the Velo-Orange double-leg, folding Copenhagen kickstand. The folding styles are much better compared with rigid style (aka, motorcycle) kickstands in that they fold out of the way rather than at risk of being hit by your ankle or the cranks. I bought a cheap pair of folding kickstands and disprefer them to the VOs. The problem with the cheap one was ...


2

I contacted the dealer, asking the same question: what is so special about steel frames, and can it be used on aluminium frame? The answer I got was: since steel frames are normally heavier than aluminium, the label means that the kickstand has been designed for those heavy loads. Therefore it can be used also on aluminium frames.


2

I think that in "some" cases people can make the case against a kickstand, but in most I think it is ridiculous. Extra weight? Are you kidding - they weigh virtually nothing. If they rattle then they are not on right. I have recumbents but whether that or standard bikes, there aren't always places to lean them up against. Or laying them down can difficult ...


2

Managed to find replacement kickstand that would fit my bike. In my case it was Ursus rear kickstand with 18mm fixing plate (there are also ones with 40mm fixing plate). Very simple to install with just two bolts. Here is the catalog of Ursus kickstands: https://ursus.it/products/urban-city/kickstands/


2

It would help to know something about your bike. On low-end steel framed bikes the two most common mountings are using the kickstand plate welded between the chainstays, and, where that is absent, using a kickstand with a clamp which grabs both chainstays. With aluminum frames, or frames with odd geometry you may need a different approach.


1

What you need is a locknut. It has a rubber ring on the side facing the screw end, and that rubber ring prevents it from getting loose. Take your screw to your local hardware store in case you do not know its size. then just tighten the nut properly.


1

I suspect that the hub bearings are wonky and are causing the axle to twist. This will tend to unscrew the right side fixing bolt.


1

It certainly looks like cracks in the steel , which is bad. When you say a "good" bicycle, I think $ ; heat treated Cr : Mo steel that has been brazed into lugs.This construction is difficult to repair ; A bicyclist specialist shop may be able to do it but it world be expensive. If the bicycle is not so good , welded plain steel , then almost any welding ...


1

From memory these are generally unserviceable. When you lower the leg, the shaft will rotate but will also move over a detent internally. Try and drop the leg half way so the internal spring is compressed, then look for the largest gap. Shove a spray straw in there and blast in white-lithium grease (not WD40) and work the leg back and forth. These are ...


1

Actually I just found out the reason, when I went to go purchase a kickstand for my steel framed Breezer. It has to do with the width of the chain stay. As steel bikes are stronger then aluminium, they tend to have smaller tubes, in particular the chain-stay. As most rear mounted kickstands are designed for the thicker aluminum frames, they do not hold tight ...


1

Just keep unscrewing (it's a standard thread) until it comes completely loose. Typically the bolt for that style of kickstand is incredibly long, so you have to unscrew for a long time.


1

No, that's not a great idea. It's going to make the pedal heavier that it needs to be. I would much rather have the weight of the stand on the frame instead of the pedal, because it adds rotating weight.


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