Hot answers tagged

55

A quick search, however, shows other colors available to purchase. Concerning "to be seen" bicycle lights, should they be avoided? Yes, they should be avoided. First, off-colors might not be legal in your area. Second, and more importantly, no one will know what it is. If a driver sees a flashing red taillight, or what looks like a normal white headlight,...


53

Don't show a red light of any kind on the front unless you want a head-on crash. Red is for the back only, steady or flashing. In the shadows it will look like you're riding the wrong way down the street and confuse everyone. As a worst case consider narrow roads where any cyclist will be in the middle to avoid the doors of cars parked on both sides. A ...


42

Most places will legally require you to run with white lights on the front and red lights behind. This is crucially important because it immediately tells everybody else on the road whether you're coming towards them or moving away. I once nearly hit somebody because they had a red light on the front of their bike. I saw that at the usual distance and ...


41

There is no one size fits all answer to this, except the first point below. When dealing with police, or other authority figures, always behave respectfully. Contact the people responsible for sweeping the road and ask when or if they are going to do it next. Maybe they only sweep when requested. Find out if there's a local bike advocacy group. They ...


41

Legality aside, this is a bad idea. The entire point of putting distinctly colored lights on emergency vehicles is to make them instantly recognizable as such, letting people know that they need to make way for the emergency vehicle. By placing them on another vehicle, you are desensitizing people to these important warning indicators. This desensitization ...


33

UNITED KINGDOM Intro I ride a 50" Penny-Farthing almost daily on the UK's public roads, both individually and as part of groups in daylight and evening conditions. Before venturing out onto the UK's roads when I began my Penny-Farthing journey, I asked myself this very question. And when people see me on my PF, many will invariably ask me: "Is that ...


31

I also live in Ottawa so I can provide some pertinent viewpoints. Yes, you should report it, and yes, it will probably be an exercise in frustration. Don't expect the police to do anything about it. However, you should report it anyway, it might end up in a database somewhere and give them another data point about why it's important to build more cycle ...


29

In the Netherlands at least: The license plates for bikes were tied to the taxation of bikes. You needed to get a new plate every year. The taxation lasted until WWII. The Germans abandoned the tax. After the war the tax wasn't introduced again so the plates were no longer needed. It was speculated that after the war the taxing of cars more then made up ...


28

Cost versus benefits. As you have pointed out, in some societies and at some times, there were perceived benefits. These ranged from every road user is treated the same to we control every aspect of our citizens' lives, and we create jobs for everyone, as well as we'll punish those who make the slightest transgression. As you may be aware there are always ...


24

The topic has been discussed here in the Netherlands, and found an answer summarized in the below chart (text translated into English from the original): Wrapping up: lights should be fitting the standards and fulfill their scope. No blinding, no lighting up in the sky or down the floor, no fancy colors.


21

In Holland, were I assume cycling is much more common than in Poland, the kind of traffic sign you describe are abundant (see example, "uitgezonderd" is Dutch for "except for"). And cycling against traffic in a one-way street without the sign is indeed illegal. The same rules seem to apply in Poland, though I cannot find a reliable source for Polands ...


20

I definitely recommend this. Running lights will make you more readily visible as the light will penetrate the fog to an extent. Reflectors and high-viz clothing will be somewhat less effective during foggy conditions. Use caution riding in foggy conditions as drivers may not see you until they are very close.


19

The City of Toronto required bicycles be licensed from 1935 to 1957. According to a City of Toronto web page on the topic of bicycle licensing part of the reason given at the time for repealing the by-law was "because it often results in an unconscious contravention of the law at a very tender age; they also emphasize the resulting poor public relations ...


17

Just to add to FatHippos answer: The same applies to Germany. In my home town there was a survey of all one-way roads between 2004 and 2010, which resulted in most of them now being open for bikes in both directions. These roads are also marked explicitly with a sign like the one you describe.


16

The consequences for you as an individual are perhaps not as important as the broader ramifications of your behaviour. By behaving as if you think that the local rules of the road don't apply to you, you are contributing to a perception that cyclists are dangerous idiots who disregard the rules and the safety of themselves and others. This has the effect ...


14

The UK Highwaycode states: Using the road: Turning left Rule 182 Use your mirrors and give a left-turn signal well before you turn left. Do not overtake just before you turn left and watch out for traffic coming up on your left before you make the turn, especially if driving a large vehicle. Cyclists, motorcyclists and other road users in ...


14

There is also a Czech version of allowing you to bike 'the other direction'. Biking against the one way direction is not much of a crime here and where the traffic is low, it's usually tolerated. I'd advise against biking the wrong direction in traffic heavy places like city centers, though, even when it's allowed. These signs (and corresponding ...


14

This rumored requirement at least does not stem from the paragraphs you've cited: StVZO §63 states that §32, §34 and §36(1) also apply to other road vehicles. However, the tread pattern is regulated in §36(3), which is not referenced by §63.


13

Firstly I would say that you should always ride in a way that is safe for you. If drivers have to wait as you take the necessary care, then so be it. They would have to wait hours if you fell and were killed. The only person taking responsibility for your safety is you. Here in Melbourne (Australia), in addition to train tracks, we have tram tracks. Rails ...


12

Never. I drive a school bus (and ride a bike, of course - but never at the same time) and when bicyclists wave me through, I ignore them. There is no way that they can truly judge the space that I need without running into an oncoming car or them. Same goes for when I'm in my car. I trust my own judgment. If it means that I am driving behind them for a bit,...


12

By definition, dismount means to get off the bicycle. That means you should not be straddling the top tube, but should be standing next to the bicycle. Then, you can walk the bike if needed. This is the safest bet, and the one you should use unless you have additional information. You shouldn't just get off the seat and pedal with one foot or waddle, unless ...


12

Restrictions on fitting blue warning beacons, special warning lamps and similar devices 16. No vehicle, other than an emergency vehicle, shall be fitted with (a) a blue warning beacon or special warning lamp, or (b) a device which resembles a blue warning beacon or a special warning lamp, whether the same is in working order or not. https://www....


11

An update since there has been a modification of the law in 2015 concerning this question. The Article 3 of the Décret n° 2015-808 du 2 juillet 2015 relatif au plan d'actions pour les mobilités actives et au stationnement modifies the Article R. 412-9 of the Code de la route. In particular: 1° Après le troisième alinéa, il est inséré deux alinéas ainsi ...


11

Come election time its most likely vote loser: politicians are not prepared to take on cyclists for little benefit. Further, it has the potential to take on a life of it own and really blow up in their faces. If you were a politician (who are the law makers in most jurisdictions), would you risk it? See this headline: Cycling laws: NSW to become 'laughing ...


10

Mandatory Mandatory bike paths do exist in the Netherlands (Article 5 of RVV 1990 regarding traffic and signage rules) and will be marked with a "G11" sign, a round lollipop sign with a white bicycle on a blue background. Sometimes they will additionally be distinguished from footpaths, parking spaces and other paved surfaces by a red coloring. ...


9

Depending on where you are in the world, there may be legal requirements. For example here in New Zealand at night time you MUST have White light on the front, no more than two, only one may flash, must not dazzle other road users. Must be visible from 200 metres. Red light facing the rear. Must not dazzle. Must be visible from 200 metres Pedal ...


8

Found this thread as I was looking for the same answer for the legality of pedestrian running on the bike lane with a perfectly good sidewalk next to them. Since I have not seen this being answered here, I'll post what I found from California's DMV. Pedestrian in Bicycle Lane 21966. No pedestrian shall proceed along a bicycle path or lane where there is an ...


8

No, you're not missing something, it is unsafe to have less than two brakes. If you only have one brake and it fails, you're going to have a bad time. Mostly, it's just cool to have one brake, or even zero lever brakes on your fixie. This style is probably just bleeding over into single speed bikes as well. The law in most states here in the U.S. only ...


8

If you opened someone's car door you could be committing either Dangerous cycling or Careless, and inconsiderate, cycling. (Road Traffic Act 1988) There's also the offence of Assault to consider. (CPS guidelines) An assault is committed when a person intentionally or recklessly causes another to apprehend the immediate infliction of unlawful force. ...


8

Since you asked about Switzerland (where I still remember sticking a Velovignette on my bike a few years back), here is how it worked there, based on the German-language Wikipedia entry: The Velovignette was not a registration of the bike as such, like a car registration plate. Instead, you were required by law to hold liability insurance for damages you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible