Hot answers tagged

55

A quick search, however, shows other colors available to purchase. Concerning "to be seen" bicycle lights, should they be avoided? Yes, they should be avoided. First, off-colors might not be legal in your area. Second, and more importantly, no one will know what it is. If a driver sees a flashing red taillight, or what looks like a normal white headlight,...


41

There is no one size fits all answer to this, except the first point below. When dealing with police, or other authority figures, always behave respectfully. Contact the people responsible for sweeping the road and ask when or if they are going to do it next. Maybe they only sweep when requested. Find out if there's a local bike advocacy group. They ...


41

Most places will legally require you to run with white lights on the front and red lights behind. This is crucially important because it immediately tells everybody else on the road whether you're coming towards them or moving away. I once nearly hit somebody because they had a red light on the front of their bike. I saw that at the usual distance and ...


31

I also live in Ottawa so I can provide some pertinent viewpoints. Yes, you should report it, and yes, it will probably be an exercise in frustration. Don't expect the police to do anything about it. However, you should report it anyway, it might end up in a database somewhere and give them another data point about why it's important to build more cycle ...


28

In the Netherlands at least: The license plates for bikes were tied to the taxation of bikes. You needed to get a new plate every year. The taxation lasted until WWII. The Germans abandoned the tax. After the war the tax wasn't introduced again so the plates were no longer needed. It was speculated that after the war the taxing of cars more then made up ...


27

Cost versus benefits. As you have pointed out, in some societies and at some times, there were perceived benefits. These ranged from every road user is treated the same to we control every aspect of our citizens' lives, and we create jobs for everyone, as well as we'll punish those who make the slightest transgression. As you may be aware there are always ...


24

The topic has been discussed here in the Netherlands, and found an answer summarized in the below chart (text translated into English from the original): Wrapping up: lights should be fitting the standards and fulfill their scope. No blinding, no lighting up in the sky or down the floor, no fancy colors.


22

a cyclist has the speed, mass and maneuverability of a sprinting person Not really! The world record for 100 m sprint is 9.58 s, which equals 37.6 km/h, which is fast but not anything spectacular for a bicycle. The marathon world record equals to little more than 20 km/h, which is less than my average commuting speed. Going back to "human" speeds, I would ...


20

I definitely recommend this. Running lights will make you more readily visible as the light will penetrate the fog to an extent. Reflectors and high-viz clothing will be somewhat less effective during foggy conditions. Use caution riding in foggy conditions as drivers may not see you until they are very close.


20

In Holland, were I assume cycling is much more common than in Poland, the kind of traffic sign you describe are abundant (see example, "uitgezonderd" is Dutch for "except for"). And cycling against traffic in a one-way street without the sign is indeed illegal. The same rules seem to apply in Poland, though I cannot find a reliable source for Polands ...


19

Is it legal? That depends on the country's traffic laws and on the exact layout of the intersection. The traffic laws that I am familiar with (Denmark, Austria) indicate that the bicyclist you describe was wrong to overtake a right-turning car on the car's right side. If there is a bike lane that extends through the intersection, then AFAIK the cyclist ...


19

California Vehicle Code section 21717: Turning Across Bicycle Lane states that cars are required to enter the bike lane before turning. Whenever it is necessary for the driver of a motor vehicle to cross a bicycle lane that is adjacent to his lane of travel to make a turn, the driver shall drive the motor vehicle into the bicycle lane prior to making the ...


19

No. In California, a car can only drive in a bike lane 200 feet before making a turn from that side of the road or when entering or exiting the road. California Vehicle Code 21209


19

The City of Toronto required bicycles be licensed from 1935 to 1957. According to a City of Toronto web page on the topic of bicycle licensing part of the reason given at the time for repealing the by-law was "because it often results in an unconscious contravention of the law at a very tender age; they also emphasize the resulting poor public relations ...


17

The speed limits of the German traffic law (Straßenverkehrsordnung) make a distinction between general rules for "Vehicles" (Fahrzeuge) and "vehicles with engines" (Kraftfahrzeuge). i.e. §3 StVO: Wer ein Fahrzeug führt, darf nur so schnell fahren, dass das Fahrzeug ständig beherrscht wird. [...] Die zulässige Höchstgeschwindigkeit beträgt auch ...


16

Traffic law (in the US): The law considers the bicycle, first and foremost, to be a mode of transport, and sees a need to regulate the flow of bikes the way it regulates the flow of automobiles. This dates back to the dawn of automobiles, if not before (though in some states it took decades for the law to spell things out as it does). This makes sense, ...


16

Just to add to FatHippos answer: The same applies to Germany. In my home town there was a survey of all one-way roads between 2004 and 2010, which resulted in most of them now being open for bikes in both directions. These roads are also marked explicitly with a sign like the one you describe.


16

The consequences for you as an individual are perhaps not as important as the broader ramifications of your behaviour. By behaving as if you think that the local rules of the road don't apply to you, you are contributing to a perception that cyclists are dangerous idiots who disregard the rules and the safety of themselves and others. This has the effect ...


15

The 3 foot law is an example of a law that exists mostly to create awareness rather than having some direct practical function. This law is rarely enforced by itself. Can anyone cite an instance where a motorist was ticketed for passing in under three feet (and not ticketed for anything else)? The 3-foot law is, AFAIK, typically enforced as a supplement to ...


14

Plan your route accordingly. Make sure there's a couple gas stations or restaurants along the way that you could stop at if the need arises. It's probably a good idea to be somewhat close to civilization not only for urination purposes, but also in case you have some major mechanical problem with your bike, or you fall and get hurt. This doesn't mean your ...


14

The UK Highwaycode states: Using the road: Turning left Rule 182 Use your mirrors and give a left-turn signal well before you turn left. Do not overtake just before you turn left and watch out for traffic coming up on your left before you make the turn, especially if driving a large vehicle. Cyclists, motorcyclists and other road users in ...


14

There is also a Czech version of allowing you to bike 'the other direction'. Biking against the one way direction is not much of a crime here and where the traffic is low, it's usually tolerated. I'd advise against biking the wrong direction in traffic heavy places like city centers, though, even when it's allowed. These signs (and corresponding ...


13

Firstly I would say that you should always ride in a way that is safe for you. If drivers have to wait as you take the necessary care, then so be it. They would have to wait hours if you fell and were killed. The only person taking responsibility for your safety is you. Here in Melbourne (Australia), in addition to train tracks, we have tram tracks. Rails ...


12

In the UK, the law that says cyclists are vehicles rather than pedestrians pre-dates the automobile. The specific pieces of legislation are: Highway Act 1835 If any person shall wilfully ride upon any footpath or causeway by the side of any road made or set apart for the use or accommodation of foot passengers; or shall wilfully lead or drive any ...


12

I'm going to try to answer the question about WHY are bicycles are considered vehicles rather than listing the multitudinous local laws that say as much. The justifications that I see are: a bicycle is a transport machine, therefore a vehicle. Tautologically. cyclists behave like other vehicle users. They generally travel faster than pedestrians, are less ...


12

At any intersection that has marked turn lanes, I position myself inside the outermost turn lane, inside the line enough that I can't be squeezed between a turning car and one going straight. I then proceed through the intersection on a slightly wider path than the car will take so as not to impeded traffic any more than possible, and head for the bike ...


12

The Code de la Route also states the following: En marche normale, tout conducteur doit maintenir son véhicule près du bord droit de la chaussée, autant que le lui permet l'état ou le profil de celle-ci. Which means: In a regular situation, any driver must keep his vehicle close to the right side of the road as much as the state of the road allows ...


12

Never. I drive a school bus (and ride a bike, of course - but never at the same time) and when bicyclists wave me through, I ignore them. There is no way that they can truly judge the space that I need without running into an oncoming car or them. Same goes for when I'm in my car. I trust my own judgment. If it means that I am driving behind them for a bit,...


12

By definition, dismount means to get off the bicycle. That means you should not be straddling the top tube, but should be standing next to the bicycle. Then, you can walk the bike if needed. This is the safest bet, and the one you should use unless you have additional information. You shouldn't just get off the seat and pedal with one foot or waddle, unless ...


11

Yes, technically. Most sorts of cycle are required to have at least two efficient braking systems, by which the front wheel (or wheels) can be braked independently of the rear wheel (or wheels). The likelihood of you receiving a ticket, fine, or other punishment is infinitesimal. It could happen, but it almost certainly will not. Practically, the front ...


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