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3

I think your question is "can I go as fast as the speed limit of the road if I'm not using the electric motor?" The answer, in Ontario (thank you Google) appears to be yes. The "Ministry of Transportation" of Ontario has a page on electric bikes as well as a FAQ, both of which say that the bike can't exceed 32km/h. No modifications to the motor to allow ...


3

If it’s just the rubber tread which is worn down and thinner: Keep using it. With treadless tires you’ll only suffer from increased susceptibility to punctures. Of course with knobby/treaded tires your grip on soft surfaces will gradually decrease. If the tire’s structural integrity could be compromised: Don’t use it. It could fail catastrophically at any ...


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Depends completely on the wording of the regulations in the UK, which are the "Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations" or RVLR. The relevant points of RVLR are: Lights and reflectors are required on a pedal cycle only between sunset and sunrise. Lights and reflectors are not required when the cycle is stationary or being pushed along the roadside. When they ...


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I can't find a legal requirement specific to bicycles anywhere. There are width restrictions but not height or length restrictions for bicycles. It would be "reasonable" to have a trailer no-longer than a trailer towed behind a motor vehicle so there's an existing precedent already set. Basically length is governed by the corners you want to go around. ...


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Worst case from a worn tyre would be it splitting, and popping off the rim causing the wheel to lock up, and you to probably fall off, or at least damage the wheel. I managed to get an innertube pinched between the front rim and the tyre on a racing bike, got a few hundred metres down the road and it popped with enough force to completely blow the tyre off ...


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As others have said, the biggest risk comes from sidewall failures. Even with the tread worn out there's usually enough (reinforced) rubber to prevent splitting on the tread, but the sidewalls are weaker. I would say the worst case is for it to blow out while cornering hard. You're likely to lose grip and not get it back again, so slide out and hit the ...


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The 3-Foot Law passed a few years back has brought much more awareness with motorists and cyclists alike here in CA. I have noticed greater compliance here in Midtown Sacramento where one motorist will yield to a bicyclist and whoever is behind them in the following car will follow suit. How other cities/neighborhoods have reacted is beyond my reach, since ...


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Many cities in Canada do not allow for cyclists to mount their bicycles on pedestrian walkways, and must ride on the road in the flow of traffic, on designated pathways, or in bike lanes. Pulling over to the shoulder to allow traffic to pass is permitted. This is enforced by both local bylaw and policing services, as well as the RCMP (I know this through ...


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As of this writing, it looks like the list of states with Idaho Stop laws includes: Arkansas Colorado (opt-in per municipality) Delaware Oregon There's a longer list of states with "Dead Red" laws that explicitly permit a cyclist to proceed through a red that won't turn green (typically because embedded induction-coil sensors don't pick up bikes), although ...


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Washington State's Senate just passed a bill to allow this. It passed by a wide margin and should clear the house as well. https://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=6208&Year=2019&Initiative=false


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