Hot answers tagged

56

A quick search, however, shows other colors available to purchase. Concerning "to be seen" bicycle lights, should they be avoided? Yes, they should be avoided. First, off-colors might not be legal in your area. Second, and more importantly, no one will know what it is. If a driver sees a flashing red taillight, or what looks like a normal white headlight,...


42

Most places will legally require you to run with white lights on the front and red lights behind. This is crucially important because it immediately tells everybody else on the road whether you're coming towards them or moving away. I once nearly hit somebody because they had a red light on the front of their bike. I saw that at the usual distance and ...


24

The topic has been discussed here in the Netherlands, and found an answer summarized in the below chart (text translated into English from the original): Wrapping up: lights should be fitting the standards and fulfill their scope. No blinding, no lighting up in the sky or down the floor, no fancy colors.


10

Mandatory Mandatory bike paths do exist in the Netherlands (Article 5 of RVV 1990 regarding traffic and signage rules) and will be marked with a "G11" sign, a round lollipop sign with a white bicycle on a blue background. Sometimes they will additionally be distinguished from footpaths, parking spaces and other paved surfaces by a red coloring. Some ...


9

Depending on where you are in the world, there may be legal requirements. For example here in New Zealand at night time you MUST have White light on the front, no more than two, only one may flash, must not dazzle other road users. Must be visible from 200 metres. Red light facing the rear. Must not dazzle. Must be visible from 200 metres Pedal ...


4

If the bike path is marked with a round blue bike sign then it is a mandatory-use path. Optional bike paths are marked with a rectangular blue sign saying fietspad ("bike path'). See the link for the images: https://www.fietsersbond.nl/ons-werk/infrastructuur/fietspaden/.


4

This question has two parts : is it wise to change the colors of your lights ? and is it legal to do so ? Concerning whether, regardless of the law, you could change the color of your lights, I'd say it heavily depends on which color you choose, and in which country you live. Lights have to purposes: to see correctly the road and to be seen correctly. - ...


3

I think your question is "can I go as fast as the speed limit of the road if I'm not using the electric motor?" The answer, in Ontario (thank you Google) appears to be yes. The "Ministry of Transportation" of Ontario has a page on electric bikes as well as a FAQ, both of which say that the bike can't exceed 32km/h. No modifications to the motor to allow ...


2

In short, turn or stop hand signals, historically come in two styles: British and American. The British way is (sitting on the right side of the car): to turn right, you stick your right arm straight out, to turn left, you stick your right arm and rotat it counterclockwise, to slow down or stop, you stick your right arm with the palm down and move it up ...


2

Since we are talking about Australia, there are two distinct requirements: Section 259 "Riding at night" of the Australian Road Rules about use of bicycles on road-related areas; and Consumer Protection Notice 6/2004 "Consumer Product Safety Standard: Pedal Bicycles: Safety Requirements" about safety equipment to be present upon the sale of a bicycle. ...


1

The 3-Foot Law passed a few years back has brought much more awareness with motorists and cyclists alike here in CA. I have noticed greater compliance here in Midtown Sacramento where one motorist will yield to a bicyclist and whoever is behind them in the following car will follow suit. How other cities/neighborhoods have reacted is beyond my reach, since ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible