Hot answers tagged

52

Whether it's rude is a matter of local custom. Whether you're offended by it depends on your flexibility and sensitivity Often, we cyclists can become a little over sensitive, after having to defend ourselves from car doors, pedestrians, cars, trucks, laws that don't take us into account, police who have a ticket quota, and even other cyclists. Relax. The ...


35

Warranties exist to protect you, the consumer, against defects in materials or workmanship, not against deliberate damage. The purpose of a bike lock is to help avoid your bike being stolen, so if it has prevented a theft of the bicycle then it has done its job well. Perhaps you can ask Decathlon and report back to us by answering your own question for ...


25

With multiple bikes, locking them together prevents them being picked up or ridden off. The latter is often the biggest risk when camping - simple opportunism. A reasonably long cable lock would lock all the bikes together (also outside cafes), and if you use it in an awkward position (down near the chainrings), getting cutters to it would be noisy, and ...


19

I used nail varnish, it sticks well to the plastic and is very tough. It's easier to apply than spray paint, but a bit more fiddly and forms a thicker layer of paint. I also used it to mark the locks. You get bottles in the most absurd colours in a 1-pound shop in the teenage cosmetics section.


17

Some locks offer "insurance" where you can get a payout if their lock fails to protect your bike. Of course there are caveats like "lock must be used" and "thief must leave lock behind" (for inspection for weakness) and so on, and even "lock must be registered with company" The only places that can tell you details would be the supplier and the ...


16

tw: extreme anti-hipster /snark Ahh! The u-lock belt holder. The perfect accessory for hipsters, literally: Advantages: Everyone will know you're a hipster People may think you're into hardcore bondage No ugly plastic u-lock holder marring the beautiful lines of your pristine lacquer-coated steel fixie If you get mugged you have something to fight back ...


14

It turns out that one of the bolts doesn't retract with the locking mechanism (the lock is bolted at each end rather than a hooked end and a single bolt). Here's a full writeup in case it helps anyone with similar difficulties (I couldn't find much online). With gravity to help, the lock works OK,* but with the dodgy end at the bottom it doesn't unlock. ...


14

I'd pick a different spot in the rack if possible. But if I was in a hurry or there wasn't another suitable place I'd use it (e.g. my bike doesn't fit on the bottom of the double stacker at the station; some places have decent racks and others that don't allow proper locking for all day use). I would try to make sure it's easy to get the lock off, perhaps by ...


14

A bike I sometimes borrow has one of these locks, and I can't say it's ever been a problem. You've given the answer in your question: Do not close the wheel lock between a spoke and the valve. If you're prone to forgetting this, what you need is a way to make the valve more obvious. I've had automatically illuminated valve caps before. That would do the ...


13

It still doesn't hurt to contact the manufacturer, but do not talk to as if they owe you anything. Do an open inquiry and see if there's anything they can do. Companies can actually do things out of the ordinary and isn't only bound by warranties. Maybe they'll want your lock back to examine how it survived a theft and give you a replacement.


12

Have you tried a well-aimed hammer blow while the key is turned in an attempt to use inertial force (instead of spring force) to move the latch piece? Start with taps at first. Have you tried some lubricant injected into the latch hole, in combination with #1? If both fail, then you have to go with brute force. An angle grinder is the easiest way to get a ...


11

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock--if you can cut though 18mm, you ...


11

I'm answering my own question because I took a combination of the steps above, plus some other steps. I took steps to make getting it back in event of theft more likely: registered the bike with the Chicago police: https://portal.chicagopolice.org/portal/page/portal/ClearPath/Online%20Services/Bike%20Registration I plan to register it with https://www....


11

Paint (and even nail varnish) will chip off the plastic sooner or later. The important thing is to get the paint into the grooves where it's protected. On my recent series 2 this means the logo on one side, the key number on the other. I've got an older series 2 with a slightly different key body, and the grooves on that aren't as deep (and in the case of ...


10

You could get some Pitlocks or other secured skewers, and then use a standard U-Lock/Folding lock on your rear stays. I'm not sure if Pitlocks fit a recumbant properly or if you want to trust your entire bike to them (rather than just the wheels) but it would probably be OK. Also, you could use a U-Lock between the seat and the front fork (possibly with ...


10

There isn't all that much point. We have a lot of knowledge on how to make steel tough. It's also pretty cheap. This basically makes it win-win for manufacturers: use enough tough steel in a good structure with a good locking mechanism to get a decent lock. It doesn't cost a lot and its easy to fabricate. The weight of many good locks is not that much to ...


10

I think that picking up a second bike is definitely a good approach. Not only does it allow you to not risk your more expensive bike getting stolen, but it allows you to have a bike more suitable to commuting. You can put fenders and racks on your commuting bike. Perhaps wider tires if you want something a little more comfortable. Since you are good with ...


10

I would suggest a Pacsafe Security Web or similar product to cover your gear. It is basically a net made of small gauge steel cables. It is designed to cover a backpack along with a long cable to secure it to a tree or other object. As far as the bikes are concerned I would suggest each rider carry a 2 meter or 6 foot cable. If it is a keyed lock make sure a ...


9

This will depend on MANY things, including but not limited to: local custom office politics special concerns (I can't think of any, but more in this later) utilization of the rack your feelings on the matter type of lock Local custom is important. In some areas it's horridly rude; in others it's common. Does the parking complex for cars have assigned spots?...


9

I have a Burley pet/cargo trailer and when I take it to the store, I use a long (~ 3 meter) cable with a loop on the ends. I loop the one end around itself on one wheel, loop it around the hitch bar, thread it through the spokes of the other wheel, loop it around the hitch bar again, then lock it through my bike's U-lock. It's not super secure since the ...


9

Sounds like you have moisture in there somewhere and its frozen. Try pouring warm (not boiling) water on it from a jug. When you get it open, take it inside, dry it, and store in a hot water cylinder cupboard to drive out moisture. If you don't have a HWC then 30 minutes in a normal oven on super-low temperature would do. Or even putting the open lock ...


8

Just to confirm, I had the same problem with the Abus 410 this morning. Tapping fairly hard on the end of the lock with a hammer where the bolt wasn't retracting whilst my other half wiggled the key in the lock sorted the problem in a few seconds. Much easier with two people than trying to wiggle and hit the lock at the same time.


8

Yes and no. Yes, that’s how they’re constructed - as two concentric pipes for strength. No, as in they shouldn’t come apart that easily. You may have lost a retaining screw that keeps them together. You could also just glue the two shells back together with some metal epoxy, taking care not to foul the locking mechanism. Just a little epoxy is all you ...


8

You can get another key for your lock by ordering it from Kryptonite at this link.


8

The same racks were installed "temporarily" at my local station at the beginning of the year. This is somewhere where a bike with only a cable lock is unlikely to last a week of commuting before being stolen. It's often possible to put your back wheel in these racks, being careful of the rear derailleur (you may need to select a very high gear). ...


7

Have you tried one of these folding locks? http://www.treefortbikes.com/product/333222381361/144/Abus-Bordo-85cm-Granit-X.html?gclid=COPRr6H2prQCFQtxQgodRSYA5g Feed it through the wheel, through the chain, and back over your frame. No self respecting thief would take the time to try and untangle it without being caught.


7

This is a late answer I know, but I've found a solution to the rattling problem. I've had an Abus 6500 for nearly 3 years now and the rattling always annoyed me. I used to wrap a kind of nylon strap between the lock as I folded it and that partly solved it, although most of the rattle was coming from the joints themselves. It was only just today when I ...


7

Probably your best bet if you want to park them is to meet someone with a large shed who'll put the bikes up for you. If you make the finance/convenience tradeoff I think selling the bikes after your stay and getting new ones when you return might be a better option, but I understand the convenience of having the same bike. I can think of several options ...


7

You might have a bit more luck doing things the other way around - go to the Sold Secure web site and read off a list of compliant locks. When I was buying, I took this approach, chose the locks and then bought them online. Also, bear in mind that Sold Secure originated in the UK, so possibly lock manufacturers who sell mostly outside of the UK market might ...


7

Yes, two phrases for the same thing. More specifically its the frame's serial number. Other components may have their own serial numbers too. Any electric shifting component will likely have serial numbers which can be read by software, as will power meters or other sensors. Small priced items generally don't have serial numbers.


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