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24

As a one-off, that should be completely doable. Your fitness from running and the gym should be plenty enough, especially as the route is pretty flat. Bear in mind that it will be tiring, since cycling uses different muscles to running, and the saddle may get a bit uncomfortable if you're not used to it. Make sure you have plenty of water and something like ...


14

Man, just do it! There isn't much that can go wrong. If you feel tired, turn around midway. Take a mobile phone with you in case something happens, look up the weather forecast, take something to eat and drink with you (or some money to buy some). If you end up at a different location than initially planned, so be it; my personal experience is that too much ...


10

To add to Michael's comment if it's your property you can't be forbid to bring a bicycle into your apartment, unless it's somehow unlawful to be in possession of said bicycle. Would you be forbid to bring a crank set or a pair of wheels or a bar set into your apartment? Why would you be forbid to bring those things assembled in a certain way into your ...


8

Nope - go for it. Here are two suggested routes from Strava, which were generated at https://www.strava.com/routes/new and then clicking a start and end point, and changing some options. This first one is based on "most popular with cyclists" and runs for 30 km with total elevation change of 204 metres. Another choice is "minimise elevation change" which ...


7

Neither Boris bikes nor folding bikes are exactly built for speed, so we can consider mainly the gearing. For this, gear inches are a convenient measure taking into account not just the gear ratio but the wheel size. On Brompton folders (as a well-documented example) you have a choice of gearing but the default 6-speed gives up to 100 gear inches. That's ...


7

You can take your non-foldable bike only as far west as Leyton on the Central Line and only off peak. The map here shows where cycles can travel on the underground. The green lines are the permitted routes. Where a station is on the route it has access for cycles. The Central Line is a very deep line so once underground it wouldn't be possible to get a bike ...


5

Some UK rail companies, such as GWR (who operate some local trains in West London as well as mainline services) only consider bikes to be folding if the wheels are up to 20". Folding bikes with a maximum 20-inch wheel can be carried as luggage without any restriction. Please make sure you fold it before boarding. That would exclude the bike you've ...


5

The single most important thing to know about cycling in London is never ride on the left side of a turning large vehicle, especially an articulated lorry or bendy bus. Many of the cycling fatalities in London are cyclists who ride up the outside of a large vehicle trying to negotiate a corner. Really an important rule for cycling anywhere.


5

In my experience, it seems fairly standard practice for the tenancy agreements supplied by agents to forbid the storage of bikes in properties. I have always just done so regardless, though I can understand why you might want to avoid clearly violating the terms of your agreement. I'm fairly sure that your landlord (unless they are live-in) is required to ...


5

This is really only a question you can answer for yourself. How fit are you? How much do you ride currently, is 11 miles a long way for you? Are you comfortable in London traffic? Is it raining? These questions, and others, you will need to answer before you get close to an answer. Personally, I'd do it, I chose 2 points on the map in London at random and ...


5

The vehicular and cycle traffic has priority, since the crossing is not a zebra crossing and there are no traffic lights, which are the only situations in which the Highway Code talks about pedestrians having priority. However, as you have noted, many people seem to be confused by the crossing, so you should be ready to stop in case a pedestrian does step ...


4

It's subjective whether it's advisable for you. I do it, but you have to think about the following things: How often? Don't jump in to trying it every day to begin with Route. To begin with, allow plenty of time for getting lost and exploring different routes. It took me at least six months to settle on a route. Luggage. I have a small seatpost rack that ...


4

As a former and occasional landlord, I can see why folks would try to forbid bikes in building. They have a nasty habit of leaving gouges in hallways and doors right about the height at which pedals are when they're carried. But such things are really best handled under general prohibitions against damaging property and assessing damages against security ...


4

The light controls the stop line (and, if there is one, the advance stop line). I can't tell from the streetview image, or from streetview itself or the satellite view, whether the cycle path moves from the road to the footway before the stop line or not. If it does - you don't have to cross the line, and the light doesn't affect you (so long as you ...


4

I typically tell people that any normal healthy novice can get on a bicycle and do 10 miles per hour without difficulty, so if you can walk for two hours stop for lunch and walk back, then you can do this with less work. Pack water, a cellphone and lunch money. If things go wrong you can put the bike in the boot of a cab.


4

Our LBS has a Saturday morning ride for which we often get beginners. Many are no longer young and not particularly fit. They can do 17 miles of flat ride before lunch. I wouldn't worry about the amount of exercise if you have a nice break in the middle. Discomfort after that much riding is more of a worry. Allow enough time, about two hours each way ...


3

It depends totally on the design of the cycle way. Here are three examples, all from the same intersection in Christchurch, New Zealand. Note, we ride/drive on the left side of the road. Satellite View https://www.google.co.nz/maps/@-43.4510769,172.6285092,165m/data=!3m1!1e3 Yes totally okay to bypass these lights. Hell no! its clearly obvious that ...


3

I have a folder, and its not fast. Riding at about my FTP for an hour returns an average speed of "high twenties km/h" where the same power does mid to high thirties km/h on a normal road bike. My generic main-beam steel folder has 20" wheels and weighs 15 kilos which is on the high side, and its effectively too small for me. It has a 46 tooth single ...


3

Being a Londoner I would say this. If you want to guarantee being able to take a folding bike on the tube go for a Brompton or something that folds to the same size. Decathlon do very similar folding bikes. You could probably get Montagne Crosstown on 80-90% of your journeys but there will inevitably be a day when a high on power tfl staff member stops you ...


3

The authorative source would be Transport for London's website at https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/cycling/cycling-in-london/bikes-on-public-transport which states: Tube: You can take a folded bike anywhere and anytime Dockland Light Rail: Can be used on all DLR trains, at any time London Overground: Are accepted on London Overground trains at all times ...


3

The wheel that finally worked for me is a Mavic A719 with Sapim Strong spokes and a spoke freeze as well as the thickest Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre they could fit on the wheel. It was built by Mamachari Bikes in Dalston, London. I've been having no problems with it since a few months now.


2

If it happened in a week, you should take the bike back to the shop you bought the bike from and get them to give you a new wheel (or at least fix the one you have) for free [generally, they should have you take the bike in for a service after ~30 days / 50 miles, whichever comes first, for free]. Any competent bike shop should be able to replace a few ...


2

These services vary wildly from shop to shop. My local shop will look at any bike and tell the owner if it's safe to ride. And of course, they'll tell the owner how much it would cost to make it safe if it's not already. They're pretty honest about it, but of course I can't guarantee that other places are. Most shops offer a free "tune-up" with the ...


1

It's do-able. We have some guests, a couple in their 20s or 30s, who both know how to cycle but aren't accustomed to it. They were able to go somewhere and back, 25 km each way. Caveat: It took them several hours; partly because they stopped when they got there. But also because they cycle relatively slowly. They borrowed my bikes which are "hybrids" of ...


1

If you were a little older I'd say work up to it over a month or so, doing progressively longer rides to give your body time to adjust and tell you how it's doing, but at 17 you can recover from almost anything. Have a great time. I can't tell how much you've ridden already, but maybe (if you're not tubeless) practice changing a flat in the field to make ...


1

English law is actually very clear. It is deemed to be who is at fault. Pedestrians are very rarely at fault (a resent case of a pedestiran crossing a road whilst looking at her mobile phone only partially relieved the cyclist of fault.) Even if there is no crossing at all, a pedestrian will rarely be found at fault under English Law. In this instance both ...


1

In London? Check out Evans Cycles, they have a gozillion shops and do Bronze, Silver and Gold services. Their web site tells you what you get at each level, looks like their stores price separately but to give you and idea the pricing from one of their stores can be found here. Have generally found Evans a little more expensive than other shops for parts, ...


1

Personally, I wouldn't go for the tune-up service package unless I needed to have everything done that was in the package. For instance, at my LBS, they charge $50 for brake, gears, minor wheel true, light cleaning (no disassembly), lube, air in the tires, safety inspection, and minor parts/accessories installation. Which might be good if I just picked up a ...


1

Updated answer: The "Finn" phone holder: https://getfinn.com/. Cheaper at Amazon than direct, though smaller choice of colours.


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