29

Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


28

50 miles is feasible but it will be hard work. Think about how tired you felt after cycling 20 miles. Then cycle 20 miles again from that tired start and think about how tired you'll feel then. Then, cycle another ten miles. The other answers give lots of good advice which I won't repeat. Since you mention trains and coming home every week, I assume that ...


26

This happens to runners more than bikers but is the same thing you describe... friction. I've done band-aids, tape and even special products (Nipguards) made for covering just the nipple area but the best remedy I've found is compression clothing. Even in the middle of summer, I will wear some skin tight Under Armour shirt. Heat Gear (odd naming, but ...


15

The OP needs to cover 150km on flat surface within 12 hours. It's the average speed of 12.5 km/h. Even if we are more realistic and allow for one hour break every 2h15', we end up with four stages of less than 38km each to be ridden at the average of less than 17km/h. If we put some challenge into the event and, let's say, set on the average speed (excluding ...


15

I expect that the three main contributors are: The solo riders are just stronger. There's more glory in the solo win so, if you are strong enough to, say, come in the top five on your own, it's probably better to do that than come in the top five as a pair. For example, compare tennis: the really strong players concentrate on singles. It's easier to look ...


14

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


14

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


13

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


13

I live in a rural area, and I am always looking for new roads. Most of the roads here have no shoulder, and there are some cliffs. The first thing that I do when I'm deciding whether a new road is too dangerous or not is to do a test-drive in a car. I look to see where there is a shoulder and where there isn't, I look for blind curves, I look at the ...


12

I have had this problem when running (it's known as jogger's nipple). It's caused by friction when your top rubs against your nipples, moisture from sweat (or rain) tends to make it worse. Wearing technical clothing that draws moisture away from your skin will help, along with some kind of barrier cream. Personally, I use bodyglide as I find it easy to ...


11

Openstreetmap with the cycle layer certainly shows some. Here's one I was very grateful for in the French Alps. OSM is not complete but it's open source so you can improve it (I haven't added any taps, but I have added bike parking). This is a good approach, as it also shows cafes and shops where you should be able to buy water if there's no tap (flipping ...


10

Don't be afraid to get off the bike. Take a break every hour or so. Shake out your legs, shake out your arms. Stetch your muscles. When on the bike, try to remember to switch hand positions often set a timer on your watch every 10 minutes if you have to to remind you to switch things up a bit. Eat before you are hungry, at regular intervals. Don't ...


10

You don't mention where you get your calories burn/hour rate, but 800 cal/hour is a very fast ride. 800 cal/hour would be around 220 watts, and that's a lot for 6 hours. When you are riding, some of your energy is coming from carbohydrate metabolism, and some is coming from fat metabolism. The ratio between the two depends upon how hard you are riding, your ...


10

Is it very ambitious? Yes! Can it be done? Yes! To make it work, you are going to have to invest practically all your free time preparing, as you have a lot to do. Bike Maintenance You are going to want to learn the basics of bike maintenance. Fixing punctures Adjusting gears Changing brake pads Repairing a chain Logistics You said you want to take ...


10

Consider two quite strong riders. One is an amazing climber and the other descends at ludicrous speeds. They ride over a col together. They go up at the pace of the slower climber, and come down the other side at the pace of the slower descender, thus taking longer than either would have on their own. Of course both riding at their own pace and regrouping ...


9

100 RPM minus your age. (Only half kidding.) 80-90 RPM is a good target for younger, fairly serious bikers. When I was in my 20s-30s I could do that for several hours. As I get older (I'm 63) I find it harder -- 70 RPM is probably closer to my "optimal" speed now, and I drift down toward 60 if I don't keep at it. One rule I tell folks that I think is ...


9

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


9

I would suggest attaching the bars and doing some test rides. Is your bike, with it's aggressive geometry, stable when using them? Are you comfortable using them? Does this new position provide some relief, or is it just more annoying? I think you're the only one who can determine if they'll be an advantage to you. In general, I'd think the extra position ...


9

It's doable if you are young and fit and don't mind some pain. If you have ridden up to 20 miles, but regularly only ride a few miles, you may find 50 miles is a struggle, just because you are not used to it. On the initial attempts plan to take it easy and build in rest stops. From your 20 mile rides you should have a good idea of the pace you can sustain. ...


9

I'm interested in how we can maximise restoring energy stores (mainly glycogen, but I'm deliberately being vague) either between closely spaced rides or on long rides. On a ride Here your ability to actually rebuild glycogen stores are compromised as your body is trying to fuel the activity not rebuild your stores. Exercise actually alters your physiology,...


9

This question gets asked quite often. The short answer is that you can do long distance rides on basically any bicycle as long as it’s comfortable for you. There are a few things you can do to your bicycle to make it more efficient and easier: Make sure your seating position is good. Especially that your saddle is high enough. This will improve power ...


8

Out on the road its a mixture. But first, are you able to measure your cadence? I use this as my guide (i.e. I try and keep my cadence within a certain range no matter what the gradient) - if I am able to pedal comfortably at over 80rpm, then its time to change to a bigger gear. If I'm unable to pedal comfortably at 65rpm, its time to go to a smaller gear. ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, mini-...


8

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been really helpful to me when pondering saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support your "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


8

I'll concentrate first on the carbs side, because the water depends on so many factors. Gels are around 30% non-sugar carbs with the rest water, according to the SIS ones I have here. They're actually a fairly heavy way to carry a small amount of carbs if you can get water along the way, but they're easy to consume while riding hard, and are meant to give ...


8

You can certainly do Brevet Populaires (100 km). Plenty of people do them on all sorts of bikes. I've seen a few people on flat bars on Brevets de Randonneurs 200 in the UK, including an MTB with knobbly tyres (the one with the backpack in this picture). Hybrids on these rides tend to be set up as flat bar road bikes, i.e. smoothish tyres around 25-...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


7

The terms "performance bike" and "endurance bike" aren't very well defined. To many people, the term "endurance bike" describes touring bicycles, which are used for long-distance self-supported rides where you're carrying a lot of equipment and supplies. However, Fuji (which you referred to), uses the term "endurance bike" to mean a road bike with a more ...


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