29

Most sources I've read suggest that your body can process at most 300 calories per hour during exercise. And a lot of sources suggest that you only attempt to replace roughly 200 calories per hour at best. You should be able to do this easily without any simple sugars. Your initial budget is much much larger than 1500 calories, you don't need to do a one for ...


28

50 miles is feasible but it will be hard work. Think about how tired you felt after cycling 20 miles. Then cycle 20 miles again from that tired start and think about how tired you'll feel then. Then, cycle another ten miles. The other answers give lots of good advice which I won't repeat. Since you mention trains and coming home every week, I assume that ...


24

As a one-off, that should be completely doable. Your fitness from running and the gym should be plenty enough, especially as the route is pretty flat. Bear in mind that it will be tiring, since cycling uses different muscles to running, and the saddle may get a bit uncomfortable if you're not used to it. Make sure you have plenty of water and something like ...


19

They are nice to walk Proper fitted MTB shoes with SPD cleats are quite comfortable to walk in, at least for non-marathon distances (say, less than 10 km a day). They are still less ideal when compared to normal walking/running shoes, however, for these reasons: 1. They are stiffer than regular shoes. 2. They have less gripping surface because the metal ...


18

The OP needs to cover 150km on flat surface within 12 hours. It's the average speed of 12.5 km/h. Even if we are more realistic and allow for one hour break every 2h15', we end up with four stages of less than 38km each to be ridden at the average of less than 17km/h. If we put some challenge into the event and, let's say, set on the average speed (excluding ...


17

"Nothing is so broken you cannot make it worse" - breaking a perfectly good chain in the field, miles from nowhere, with a light weight emergency tool, would be my very last resort. This will only work if the broken end is not too frayed. Remove the cable completely from the outers and the shifter. Thread the cable though the barrel adjuster on the ...


17

I see three possibilities: Your tire pressure is too low and you are getting pinch flats. As a reference point, with 25mm wide tires and your 74kg weight I’d use at least 6bars (600 kPa) of pressure, better 6.5 or 7. Refill every week or so. Usually with pinch flats you’ll have two holes in opposing sides of the tube, like a snake bite (hence why they are ...


15

I expect that the three main contributors are: The solo riders are just stronger. There's more glory in the solo win so, if you are strong enough to, say, come in the top five on your own, it's probably better to do that than come in the top five as a pair. For example, compare tennis: the really strong players concentrate on singles. It's easier to look ...


14

Clipless pedals let you pull up a bit and road shoes are rigid-ish, so you can get some more power from each turn (of course, you're using your muscles in a bit of a different way). This also gives a bit of a different pressure distribution than platform pedals (look at the layout of say, a Look pedal versus a platform pedal). In an off road situation, they ...


14

Man, just do it! There isn't much that can go wrong. If you feel tired, turn around midway. Take a mobile phone with you in case something happens, look up the weather forecast, take something to eat and drink with you (or some money to buy some). If you end up at a different location than initially planned, so be it; my personal experience is that too much ...


13

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


13

I would strongly advise against that. Your legs are not going to be the problem, and neither is your overall conditioning/strength. If you are going to be around other riders, you need to be able to stop and start and steer safely. Road bikes steer with your butt while MTB steer with handlebars. This is a big deal when you are tired and running on ...


13

I live in a rural area, and I am always looking for new roads. Most of the roads here have no shoulder, and there are some cliffs. The first thing that I do when I'm deciding whether a new road is too dangerous or not is to do a test-drive in a car. I look to see where there is a shoulder and where there isn't, I look for blind curves, I look at the ...


12

90 miles is roughly 140km, so if you're riding that every day it's about 700km a week. Which puts you in elite rider territory for upright bikes without power assist. It's doable, it's just going to be hard and you'll need to work on nutrition and health as well as fitness. Note that there's also a balance here - if you use world class equipment to get a ...


11

Openstreetmap with the cycle layer certainly shows some. Here's one I was very grateful for in the French Alps. OSM is not complete but it's open source so you can improve it (I haven't added any taps, but I have added bike parking). This is a good approach, as it also shows cafes and shops where you should be able to buy water if there's no tap (flipping ...


10

Background Starting in the late 90's I have done a lot of long distance commuting over the years. Typically my volume has been about 200-300 km / week, not quite the 700 km/week you are proposing, but a decent amount. This is done on an upright bike with no power assist, in all weather conditions (sun, rain and light snow). In that time I have also done a ...


10

You don't mention where you get your calories burn/hour rate, but 800 cal/hour is a very fast ride. 800 cal/hour would be around 220 watts, and that's a lot for 6 hours. When you are riding, some of your energy is coming from carbohydrate metabolism, and some is coming from fat metabolism. The ratio between the two depends upon how hard you are riding, your ...


10

Is it very ambitious? Yes! Can it be done? Yes! To make it work, you are going to have to invest practically all your free time preparing, as you have a lot to do. Bike Maintenance You are going to want to learn the basics of bike maintenance. Fixing punctures Adjusting gears Changing brake pads Repairing a chain Logistics You said you want to take ...


10

Consider two quite strong riders. One is an amazing climber and the other descends at ludicrous speeds. They ride over a col together. They go up at the pace of the slower climber, and come down the other side at the pace of the slower descender, thus taking longer than either would have on their own. Of course both riding at their own pace and regrouping ...


10

there are a few things to check: make sure the rim tape is in good condition (no tears/holes, make sure it's properly aligned in the rim) remove rim tape and check if any spokes protrude more than approx 1-2mm past the top of the spoke nipples, if they do consider shortening these spokes with a file, Dremel or the like or adjusting the spokes such that they ...


9

To answer your question directly, you certainly can use clipless over long distances. However, scientific studies have actually shown that clipless pedals offer no discernible performance advantages over long distances. They have shown that a small advantage can be gained on sprints, but that's about it. That said, many cyclists do report increased ...


9

I would suggest attaching the bars and doing some test rides. Is your bike, with it's aggressive geometry, stable when using them? Are you comfortable using them? Does this new position provide some relief, or is it just more annoying? I think you're the only one who can determine if they'll be an advantage to you. In general, I'd think the extra position ...


9

It's doable if you are young and fit and don't mind some pain. If you have ridden up to 20 miles, but regularly only ride a few miles, you may find 50 miles is a struggle, just because you are not used to it. On the initial attempts plan to take it easy and build in rest stops. From your 20 mile rides you should have a good idea of the pace you can sustain. ...


9

I'm interested in how we can maximise restoring energy stores (mainly glycogen, but I'm deliberately being vague) either between closely spaced rides or on long rides. On a ride Here your ability to actually rebuild glycogen stores are compromised as your body is trying to fuel the activity not rebuild your stores. Exercise actually alters your physiology,...


9

This question gets asked quite often. The short answer is that you can do long distance rides on basically any bicycle as long as it’s comfortable for you. There are a few things you can do to your bicycle to make it more efficient and easier: Make sure your seating position is good. Especially that your saddle is high enough. This will improve power ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, mini-...


8

This article, The Four and a Half Rules of Road Saddles, from Cervélo Cycles has been really helpful to me when pondering saddles. I think the key points are: The saddle needs to be wide enough to support your "sit bones" but not so wide that it chafes on your thighs. The saddle has to be flat enough that the part between your sit bones doesn't press up on ...


8

No - that'd be like putting a Toyota rally driver into a F1 car, on race day. You'll be able to ride, but you won't be used to the nuances, as david1024 says, BUMSTEER. Road bikes need at least a week to get used to, and I went 500 km of riding in a month, before becoming comfortable on a road bike after being on MTBs for years. And I still go downhills ...


8

Nope - go for it. Here are two suggested routes from Strava, which were generated at https://www.strava.com/routes/new and then clicking a start and end point, and changing some options. This first one is based on "most popular with cyclists" and runs for 30 km with total elevation change of 204 metres. Another choice is "minimise elevation change" which ...


8

2 months is not a lot of time to prepare, but with a goal of finishing within the time limit that should be easily possible. The main thing you can do is to build up your endurance with some longer weekend rides. For example: Week 1: 30km Week 2: 40km Week 3: 50km Week 4: 60km (Take an extra rest day midweek this week) Week 5: 75km Week 6: 90km Week 7: ...


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