11

Openstreetmap with the cycle layer certainly shows some. Here's one I was very grateful for in the French Alps. OSM is not complete but it's open source so you can improve it (I haven't added any taps, but I have added bike parking). This is a good approach, as it also shows cafes and shops where you should be able to buy water if there's no tap (flipping ...


9

This question gets asked quite often. The short answer is that you can do long distance rides on basically any bicycle as long as it’s comfortable for you. There are a few things you can do to your bicycle to make it more efficient and easier: Make sure your seating position is good. Especially that your saddle is high enough. This will improve power ...


8

You can certainly do Brevet Populaires (100 km). Plenty of people do them on all sorts of bikes. I've seen a few people on flat bars on Brevets de Randonneurs 200 in the UK, including an MTB with knobbly tyres (the one with the backpack in this picture). Hybrids on these rides tend to be set up as flat bar road bikes, i.e. smoothish tyres around 25-...


6

In the USA free tap water is virtually universal, and I was able to fill up my water bottles at any fast food restaurant and convenience store I stopped at, all over the country. A switch on most restaurant soda fountains will dispense plain tap water. I also filled up at local parks and roadside rest areas.


6

In practice, most people find hybrids rather uncomfortable for long rides. What "long" means varies from person to person so, to a large extent, you'll just have to try going on longer and longer rides until you find out what your body is comfortable with. I would note, though, that 40 minutes at the 11mph you said you average in your other question is a ...


5

Two summers ago I rode 1,300 miles around Lake Superior on a Trek Verve 2, averaging about 70 miles a day. I am over 60 years old, and I like a more comfortable ride at this stage. The more durable tire of a hybrid came in handy when I needed to navigate rougher terrain. These days I am riding a Specialized Cross Trail on long rides. I love it.


5

It massively depends on the brand/consistency of the cream, how much you use, and the weather conditions. For me, a small amount of Assos cream will last 4-6hrs in normal conditions, but if its particularly hot (and hence sweating a lot) or if its rainy it lasts much less. There are some products that are much more durable (morgans blue solid for example), ...


3

For very long days in the saddle, I use a wax-based chamois cream (I use QM4 and I believe Squirt does one too or you can just use regular Vaseline) that forms a layer on top of the skin, rather than being absorbed the way that Assos or Muc-Off are. Sweat seems to have little effect on it. When showering after a 10 hour ride, I'm still be able to feel it on ...


3

There are pros and cons to each type of bike: Road bike advantages (imo): Light weight Less rolling resistance/easier to maintain higher top speed Easier maintenance in some cases (less paniers, fenders etc. That can get in the way of things better looks? Hybrid bike advantages: Pre installed fenders (you won't get dirty when riding) More mounting points ...


3

If you can maintain 20-25km/h riding speed over 230km, that's 9-12 hours of riding time. If your stops are efficient, you can easily achieve that in daylight hours in summer. I still recommend you take lights to be seen by at dusk, and in case you're delayed by a mechanical. You're not likely to be riding for long enough to be sleepy at the half way (or ...


3

Last year I rode the Houston MS-150 on a hybrid. This year some guy rode it on a penny-farthing. Your bike should be no problem, as long as it's a bike that fits you.


2

We often read here that where cyclists may ride in Delhi road surfaces are very rough. If that is indeed the case, take a road bike only if it can mount wide tyres. At least 28 mm wide, better 35 mm. If the road bike cannot, take the hybrid. Don't forget to consider the cost of such tyres in your decision. Pot holes and sharp edged debris otherwise cause ...


2

In the UK, we used to pay tax for public services, now everything has been privatised but we still pay loads of tax. There was a time when most railway stations, bus stations, high streets all had drinking fountains. All of these have been removed, for people to buy plastic water and then throw in landfill. I had thought at one point the access to free clean ...


2

I have the cure (I suffered with this same problem from biking). The cure? New-Skin Liquid Bandage, you can see it on Amazon. Regular bandaids come right off due to sweating. Liquid bandage forms a rubbery covering that will stay on. Works for me.


2

You need to honestly evaluate your expected performance and endurance on a >200km ride. You'll need to figure out an expected average speed, and a schedule of breaks that you will need, then calculate the total time needed to complete the ride. Build in a margin of error in case you go slower than expected or need longer breaks. If the the total amount of ...


1

As others have mentioned, chamois cream has a service duration depending on many things including perspiration and the degree to which you are depending on it. To look at how it is sold, you have two inconvenient options: a giant tube (or for some brands, tub), or expensive little foil packets. I just went and bought a 1 oz (28 ml) sample size tube of hand ...


1

My experience is that pretty much any bike can do pretty much any type of ride (within reason; a track bike cannot do mud racing, for example). I’ve done a 160 km ride (60 km sportive, 20 km to get there and 80 km to get home) on a fixed gear bike with narrow raiser bars. That worked fine. Was it the ideal bike for such a long ride through mostly countryside?...


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