37

As many cable manufacturers recommend, modern cables+housings are designed to not be lubricated. So, if you have modern cables, I'd probably avoid lubricating the cables period.


25

No, lithium grease or similar grease compounds are in general not suitable for bike chains. Bike chains need lubrication of inner surfaces between rollers. Chain lubes contain solvents to reduce viscosity enough to creep into these gaps. The solvent dissipates and leaves a high viscosity oil. The surface does not need extra lubrication. It is best to ...


17

As stated, modern teflon line outer cables do not require lubrication. These cables are often designated as being 2P-class cables. 1P cables lack the liner. Not all cables carry such an indication, visual inspection will quickly show if a liner is present. A teflon liner is a thin, plastic layer inside the outer cable, often white or light blue. If you have ...


17

Stuff To Use: Silicone based lubricant - for all weather conditions - especially good to use in wet or in winter - it's water resistant. It's thicker than teflon based and it's sticky (dust catches onto it making a paste - needs to be re-applied when dirt accumulates). Teflon based lubricant - for dry conditions only, thinner and runs smoother than silicon ...


15

Wet and Dry lube are pretty much universal terms, they're not constrained to one manufacturer. Wet lube is suitable for wet conditions, dry lube is suitable for dry conditions. Wet lube is quite sticky. It will stick to your mech and is less likely to get washed off by rain. The downside, because it is sticky, it can pick up crap from the road, as those ...


14

Anti-sieze is a corrosion preventer. It is not a lubricant. Generally, using it on threaded parts is acceptable, but using it on bearing races, bearings, pressfit installation points, seatposts, handlebar stems, etc... is not a good idea. There is no hard and fast rule, but if you think about the purpose of the "lubricant" on the specific part, you should ...


14

Chain lube goes on the chain. It's liquid and it drips on. We used to use "oil" for this but now there are lubes that a better engineered to provide lubrication without collecting dirt, washing off in the rain, breaking down chemically, etc. You also use this kind of liquid lube on brake pivots, derailleur pulleys and pivots. Probably not the same stuff you ...


14

No. Here's a vague, handwavy descrption of why: A dehumidifier will reduce how much vapour (oil or water, so long as the boiling point and saturation vapour pressure at room temperatureare appropriate) is in the air. In the case of water, which is in plentiful supply, there's usually enough vapour in the air to affect the rate of evaporation, because there ...


14

When lubricating a chain, we need to get the slippery stuff "into" the chain. Specifically it needs to get between the rollers and the pins, marked in RED below. This is the area that takes all of the pressure from the chainring tooth, while rolling as the chain bends and straightens, as it does while entering and exiting the toothed rings (chainring and ...


13

Paraffin wax is not a single chemical, rather it is a mix of alkanes with the formula CnH2n+2, having between 20 and 40 Carbon atoms. Commercially available Paraffin wax may also contain additives to raise melting point (normally 37 °C, 99 °F) or reduce brittleness (often stearic acid as found in tallow). It's possible that when you immerse your chain, the ...


13

It was the right thing to use the lube for the chain. I do not know the particular product but in general spray lubes have the tendency to become too plentiful on the outside of the chain. This film of lube will become sticky as the solvents in the spray are dissolved. The grinding noise from the drive train may come from sand or grit sticking to the ...


12

Short answer: No, you shouldn't. Heavy oils attract too much dirt, grit and grime which will damage the useful life of your chain. You need a light lubricant which will wick it's way into the internals of the chain, rather than simply coating the external portion of the chain. A good Teflon carrier lube like the Finish Line Teflon works well, lasts a good ...


12

This question leads to one of the great religious debates of the bicycle culture. Ask ten mechanics which chain lube is best, you'll get ten different answers. The honest answer is "it depends on your maintenance habits and the weather and your preferences, so you should try some different things until you develop an opinion of your own." That's tough to do ...


12

I use chain lube since I also prefer the solvent+grease wet chain lubes. That's exactly what you want inside cable housings. Popping the quick releases on brakes or frame attachments on gear cables, then dribbling chain lube along the inner so it runs down into the outer works well on cables that are already installed and doesn't require re-adjusting ...


11

The answer is not really. Chains are dirty and they get you dirty. Dry lubes tend to be better than wet lubes in this regard, but they'll both quickly get your legs dirty. But dry lubes are normally not considered to be good for wet riding. You can clean your chain periodically (e.g. Park Tool CM-5.2 Cyclone (TM) Chain Scrubber, which clamps onto the low ...


11

A thorough way to do it would be to: Remove the cranks, bottom bracket and seat post. Make sure there is a decent hole between the seat tube and bottom bracket shell (might depend on the frame). Ram rags down the seat tube with a broom handle and extract them via the bottom bracket shell. Once the bulk of the grease is removed (or pushed to the bottom of ...


11

This is an XY problem. Seatposts should be lubed. While removing all lube may solve your slipping problem, it will likely do so by making the seatpost corrode into place, which isn't something you want. Instead, fix or replace your seatpost clamp, and/or make sure your seatpost isn't undersized.


10

No, Kerosene won't leave behind enough of a layer to protect the chain. It might be useful as a solvent to clean the chain before applying a proper lubricant.


10

Adding to James Keuning's answer: The way I think about lube and grease is that basically, grease is for things that don't get taken apart as much, and lube is for parts that get more care, more often, and are usually more easily accessible. This absolutely does not mean that bikes do not need grease or that it isn't as important as 'lube'. I use lube on ...


10

On a chainsaw is it called bar lube (not chain lube). It is designed to lube the bar. This is chainsaw chain: Not the same beast as bicycle chain. I don't even think there are rollers. Bar lube is more viscous than bicycle chain lube. Bar lube does not need a long life - it is going to get thrown off. There is an excess of bar lube and big gaps ...


10

There are actually some organizations that have tested various chain lubricants against each other. However, some caveats. The easiest thing to test in the laboratory is drivetrain friction. The chain's durability to contamination is harder to test, although one person has done this. The research is described in this Cyclingtips article. One caveat is that ...


9

SRAM GXP bottom brackets can be user serviced, but it is usually unnecessary. To service your BB bearings, first remove the crank arms. Then place your thumb in the BB spindle hole, and bend the joint enough that your knuckle makes firm contact around the entire ring surface of the spindle hole. Pull outward using fairly firm pressure, and if necessary, ...


9

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


9

Basically every metal-in-metal thread on a bike should get some kind of treatment, because at the very least none of them are perfectly corrosion resistant, and as you say, thread lubrication helps with tightening. What it really does is greatly reduce all the many factors that create friction in threads, usually into the negligible range, so that a given ...


9

The point of waxing is not to rustproof but to lubricate the chain's internals where they articulate. The rest of the wax flakes off quickly. So this wouldn't have the desired effect.


8

Park Tool recommends their own product: I used to hate gloves for anything (car, bike, whatever) until I got used to wearing them while in Iraq and Afghanistan. Originally I used the Mechanix Wear gloves and I still like them for working on my car:


8

Oil leaking from the hub has been an ongoing problem for me too. When the bike was still new there was an oil leak from the gear changer side which went to Shimano (twice) before the internal seal was replaced (the external seal was replaced the first time to no effect. Over a year later the leak started again and this time Shimano have had the wheel for ...


8

I would avoid doing this. If the Teflon lube has any kind of solvent in it (which it probably does to carry the Teflon), it will break down the grease in the bottom bracket. Eventually, the grease will thin out enough that it will flow out of the bottom bracket, and No More Lube=A Very Bad Thing. If you are using a basic cartridge bottom bracket, they are ...


8

All of that goo is very typical of drivetrain components that are fresh from the factory. The factory uses a particularly thick lubricant to protect the parts until they're purchased or installed (lest they sit on a shelf and risk being exposed to moisture). Basically, the factory is expecting whoever installs said drivetrain components to identify any ...


8

Hang the bicycle upside down, on a stand if you have one, but you can also simply suspend it with a bit of rope. Next, you can easily clean the inside of the tube with a bottle cleaner dipped in solvent. Since the bike is upside down, there is no need to remove the cranks and BB. Gasoline or paint thinner works well to remove grease. The last bit of grease ...


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