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13

A back pack is faster than a single pannier. This exact scenario was tested in the Specialized "Win Tunnel" in their "The Brew Master" episode. They suggested the time savings was 2 minutes over 40 km, which isn't that much for casual cycling considering how uncomfortable a heavy back pack can be! Also see their "Areo at Slow Speeds" to understand how the ...


11

I have seen people trailer them, but for a local race here, many people go car free and strap them to the top tube extending back behind the seat, usually onto the rack. Found many images using google image search for "carry skis on bike" http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5132/5471607772_40dc377ed0_o.jpg


9

The answer to your question depends heavily on the infrastructure that is available to you, and the highest level of mechanical ability in your party. As another pointed out, you will want at least two pumps, multi-tools, etc. My wife and I do pretty challenging mtb tours with BOB trailers. We generally bring the following (subject to modification ...


8

My daughter still goes in a Hamax siesta at nearly 3. It's seatpost mounted and we swap it between bikes. The seat is rated to 22kg (which from the growth charts should take 99% of children up to age 4 and 75% to 5½. We're anticipating being able to use it when she starts school. You don't need to include the weight of the balance bike as that wouldn't be ...


7

At the beginning of this video: http://vimeo.com/41982043 it looks like this bike messenger has an extra strap for his bag that comes up under his left arm to stabilize his load. Looks pretty neat, like it can be easily unsnapped to get the normal messenger bag access, and possibly be DIY-able.


7

The front mounting straps on standard luggage racks are meant to be bent as needed to fit the bike. It appears that bending them down just slightly and sliding them back in their slots should produce a nice alignment of the rack.


7

They usually keep the bike narrow, suitable for trail riding where branches might snag panniers. They use soft attachments (usually), so extreme vibration doesn't make undue noise or wear things out. There are people with damaged racks simply from plastic pannier clips bumping along on them for months on end. Cheap "bikepacking" (with scare quotes) bags ...


7

Get a rear rack for your bike and strap the gym bag to it. A low cost and much safer approach.


6

I'm a member of Warm Showers, and regularly host cross-country bike tourists and get to check out their gear. Except for the occasional monk with orange robes and a small backpack, what bike tourists choose has been surprisingly uniform. It's usefully Ortlieb panniers on front and rear racks, and sometimes a handlebar bag. The details and presence of the ...


6

If you are lucky/careful with your combination of sunglasses and helmet, you can store them quite securely in helmet's vents, which makes it easy to put them on/off with a single hand: (quite hard to find a decent picture of this, screen-capture is from the Vuelta a España 2013, stage 14)


5

You could consider a self-inflating mat (e.g. thermarest) though when I looked at them they were expensive and heavier than my alternative: A foam mat only needs to reach from you shoulders to your hips if it's not too cold. You might then be able to wrap it round your top tube, because there would be a lot less to fit in there - and it would makes ...


5

Here's a DIY solution, adding a vertical ski tube to your rack


5

When ski touring we often carry skis on our backpacks - tied together at top and one each in loops each side. Very stable except in high winds. No reason this would not work riding a bike. Here is a pic


5

Electric tape is a bad idea because the adhesive can mess with your tube. Other suggestions Many off-road riders carry a hydration pack instead of bottles/bidons. Carry your spares in the pack. Jersey pockets have worked for roadies for many decades. Do you have bottle cage mounts? Either store your tools inside a bottle in the cage, or many mini pumps ...


5

For road bikes, bikepacking bags are better for going fast since they are lighter and keep the bike narrow which helps with aerodynamics. This may make a significant difference going fast and far, as for example in Mark Beaumont's record-breaking speed run from Cairo to Cape Town in 41 days. Having toured on a road bike with both types of bags, I would add ...


5

Depending on the thickness of your briefcase it may be a solution to hang it under the frame in the main triangle (if it fits there) but since you are thinking about a folding bike it is not a solution. I've seen something else couple of times - a special carrier for briefcases: I'm not sure how a folding bike would accommodate such a carrier as it ...


4

Looking through the Challenge Bikes product guide, it looks like the Seiran SL is not intended to be able to have any kind of rack on it. Maybe you should talk to the dealer you bought the bike from. It looks to me like replacing the lightweight carbon seat with the aluminum seat option might make it possible to mount the Day Rack or Voyager Rack... Would ...


4

For a trip that you describe, I would actually recommend using both a rear rack system and a front rack system. I have not used a front rack system, but I understand that it changes the handling of the bike. Having basically four panniers, two on front and two on back, will allow you to distribute the weight around so that you are left/right balanced and ...


4

I use plastic waste baskets, mounted to rear rack by springs. The weight is low over rear tires, for extra stability.Just drill some drain holes and mounting holes through plastic containers, add cord loops, and attach springs to them. Adjust tilt so that pedal clearance is adequate in turns. P.s.Cable ties turn brittle in cold weather, so don't use them in ...


4

If the image above is correct, the frame-bag is great if all you're carrying is a credit card and a puncture repair kit. It's light, cheap, unobtrusive and doesn't add much air resistance. But if you're carrying even a rain jacket, it'll be hard to find a frame bag big enough. The frame-bag is not waterproof either, so it would be best not to carry a phone ...


4

That looks as though it was chrome plated after it was welded together, which means cleaning it up so you can safely weld it again is going to be tedious. You'll need to clean the chrome off anything that will get hot, and afterwards painting it will not look that great. It would probably be cheaper to build a new rack. One repair option that occurs to me ...


4

From your other question - your budget for the bike was 300 euros. You'd spend that much on a trailer alone. Trailers more than double your rolling resistance, and increase your windage area a lot. Riding long distance with a 2 wheel trailer is unpleasant. You might build your own trailer, there are many plans around the web for this, using a square of ...


4

Good question - I've wondered the same. I looked at the Specialized SWAT toolbox for inspiration, but it only fit certain models of frame. https://www.specialized.com/us/en/equipment/bike-accessories/swat-technology/c/swatstorage Another option is to mount things directly to the waterbottle cage mounts. Here's another specialized product to do exactly ...


3

Another late answer, but posting because I don't see it posted as a solution. With a bag this small, I will wear a jacket over the bag and zip up the jacket, the bag may slide around a little, but not much and never to the front and no dangling.


3

I have attached many things to my bike. Alas I only have a few sample pictures, to help illustrate everything I have learned so far: fig1. This is a trailer I made: fig2. These are some alternate Tesco boxes: fig3. This is how I improvised with tape to attach wood and metal onto the rack: fig4. This is an improvised basket after the standard "Decathlon ...


3

I myself just put my x-country skis and poles in a lightweight ski bag with a shoulder strap and rode short distances without issues. Was even able to carry a mid-sized backpack alongside the ski bag. The trick is to put the shoulder strap over your head so that the skis won't fall off or hit your bike. However, I recently came across an interesting ...


3

I would suggest splitting the weight in half and putting it low on your bike for stability. Here is my daily commuting configuration (2 matched 6 gallon plastic waste baskets mounted by hose clamps to a standard bike rack.) (Your emptied backpack could be rolled up and placed on top if you need it for off-bike use.)


3

I personally like the saddlebag or backpack option. I keep all my tools and extras in my hydration bag. BUT... You could use removable ties and attach it to you seatpost assuming its a small enough pump. Niteize makes a product called gear ties in an assortment of sizes that are basically industrial twist ties, rubber coated thick wire that holds quite ...


3

You might be able to get a rear rack to take the pack on one side, with the tent and everything else on the other. I've seen a Czech guy touring with that setup and he seemed to have been doing it for a while (you don't get to the middle of the South Island without riding for a while). He was in Aotearoa and did not seem to speak any English at all, but I ...


3

This is a hard question to answer. Not only does each airline have its own rules as to handle bicycles or what they consider oversized luggage — the airline counter staff at check-in have “discretion” which usually boils down to a degree of capriciousness. The checkin counter staff may or may not follow their own airline’s posted guidelines in terms of ...


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