16

There are different things that can cause this problem and different tools and techniques that can be used to fix it, depending on the cause and severity. Frame material cannot be left out of the conversation. Between steel, aluminum, and carbon, the problems and acceptable solutions are all different. Carbon should usually be approached with elbow grease ...


11

Check for burrs (a small ‘lip’ of material) on the inside edge of the top of the seat tube). That’s probably what is scratching the seat post. If you stick you finger carefully in the top if the seat tube you should be able to feel any burrs, but be careful as they can be sharp. These can be gently filed or sanded away. If the inside of the seat tube or ...


4

If chain wear is beyond 1% then you are probably looking at a new drivetrain including chainrings. I would just remount the old chain and get the full wear out of everything else. As far as changing chain only the industry standard is wear between 0.5-0.75% if you change within this range the theory is you will prolong the life of the drivetrain and perhaps ...


3

That era fork will probably be spring/elastomer or spring/sealed cartridge. I believe the T2 was essentially a glorified Indy. The elastomer will have hardened and no longer be working optimally, so the shocks won't be performing like new (and when new, were not great by todays standards). The sealed cartridges were not serviceable. The play will be wear. ...


3

A very worn chain can break unexpectedly and it’s going to accelerate wear of the cassette, chainring and rear derailleur’s pulley wheels. Shifting, noise and efficiency also get worse, the more worn the chain is. I guess you can go slightly beyond 1% wear if the components need to be replaced anyway. Especially if reliability and performance are not a ...


3

The FC-M480, as originally identified in the question, is a 9-speed, Deore level crank. This is a link to Shimano's spare parts diagram. Here is a link to the M460 crankset's parts diagram. Neither indicates that the spider is available as a spare part. For Shimano cranks of this era in general, I don't believe the spider can be practically be separated from ...


3

On a recent bikepacking trip I had a flat and discovered I forgot to include my tire levers in my repair kit. I had a tube and hand pump. I used two pliable plastic cards I could sacrifice as a substitute. I folded each in half length wise and used them like levers. I bent the first one between spokes to allow space for the second one to do its job. In ...


3

The 'fix your bike scheme' forms part of the UK Conservative government's range of economic populist measures in response to covid-19 (which included 'eat out to help out', a scheme which gave discounts for restaurant meals to support the restaurant industry, but may have led to more covid cases https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/oct/30/treasury-...


2

Another maintenance task you can do is TEST your pump periodically. And that doesn't mean waiting till you get a flat and need it! The general recommendation is to give your bike an M check monthly. Simply pull the pump off its mount, seal the end with your finger, and give it a pump or two. If water comes out anywhere, or if there's no air pressure ...


2

As @DanielRHicks indicated in a comment, as far as preventing rust, you can disassemble a mini pump to let the internals dry out. This video shows how to disassemble a Lezyne mini pump. I am not 100% certain, but I think the Lezyne pumps may not have any steel parts, which should reduce the likelihood of rust. Answering the question more broadly, rubber o-...


2

The yellow dots should be lined up when in a specific gear, which is gear 4 for a 7 speed nexus, (gear 6 for an 11 speed alfine) Generally speaking, to change tube on an IGH wheel you need to get the wheel off the bike. Release rim brakes to make room for tyre to pass through Undo wheel nuts with 15mm spanner - your bike won't have a quick release. Unclip ...


2

If by “play” you mean for/aft play between the stanchion/lower interface this will be caused by bushing wear. Those early Judy shocks have very small bushings compared to what is used today. Depending on how clean you kept the shock (the early seals were horrendous as well) the bushings would typically wear out quite fast. Each side of the lower will have ...


1

The correct tool is a reamer and some good bikeshops and all framebuilders will have one. Reaming will ensure the apeture is perfectly round (taking out misshaping from welding) and correctly sized. It will also remove burrs that scratch the seatpost. This usually only needs doing once after manufacture.


1

A seatpost needs to be removed at least twice a year, cleaned and treated accordingly to its material and the frame material before re-insertion. For the treatment: metal seatpost in metal frame, apply grease before re-inserting. With a seatpost and/or a frame made from carbon, grease is TOTALLY out of question. Apply special carbon mounting paste which is ...


1

Your options are limited, but you have little to lose, so I would suggest trying to re-stake the spider. Staking is a process somewhat like riveting, but without the rivet. With a sharp punch, you can pound notches into the joint at several places the displace material and tighten it. This might work permanently or it might not work at all, but it's ...


1

Strava logs your rides, and you can choose from one of your pre-configured bikes. In the options, you can keep a track of when you changed a chain or tyre, and Strava will tally the distance each part has gone. It is not perfect because it doesn't tally time (for fork servicing) and doesn't know if the distance was easy road riding or hard MTB. It also ...


1

Had the same problem, used a pot scrub cleaner for stainless steel on the rims - got rid of the squeak.


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