13

3-5 weeks? And you assume there'll be "negative long-term effects"? Hell no! I have a bike I built in 2013. I rode it for about a year and half actively after building it, and then about a year very rarely after the active period. Then, in 2017, I stored the bike outdoors in an area where sunlight hits. It was outdoors for year and half. Then I ...


5

As a chainwheel/sprocket wears, the "engagement point" wanders away from the contact point with the chain. The chain touches the wheels with its topmost teeth relative to the chain direction, but the teeth pulling on the chain are further away - 2, 3, 5, 10 20 etc. teeth along the circumference. Before that, the chain rollers simply lay in the ...


2

Yes, aftermarket seals will work on your fork and may give you a performance improvement. All Rockshox seal kits now ship with "upgraded low friction SKF seals" rather than stock OEM models. If replacing seals you should only use well-known and trusted brands such as SKF, Racing Bros, Enduro or PUSH. As @maplepanda correctly points out you've got ...


2

You need to check whether your fork uses flanged or flangeless seals. Both are available for 32mm stanchions, and it’s specific to each model which version is needed. I’d just perform a service without changing the seals. If you insist, the foam rings should be fine (it’s just a open-cell foam ring, duh), but I wouldn’t want to use the third-party seals long-...


2

Visual is the right way. You do it by finding confluence between the tire appearing perfectly behind the seat tube, the gap between the chainstays and the tire being equal, and the gap between the seatstays and the tire being equal. Every once in a while you see a bike where those things can't all be true at once even with a correctly dished wheel, and that ...


2

My understanding with the Shimano hydraulic system is that any lever is compatible with any caliper from the entire range (road or mountain). My suggestion would be to use a lever that is is usually used with a caliper with the same number of pistons as the caliper on your bike to ensure you get the right "feel". This will probably be a single pair ...


1

In this case, you have a solid axle presumably with flanged nuts on the outside of the dropouts. You're good as long as there's: 100% thread engagement on both nuts when everything is tightened No frame or brake rub This means that the visible stick-out of thread on each side must be longer than the sum of the dropout thickness plus the nut's thickness. ...


1

Let's get our part names clear From Sheldon Brown The nut in the posted question pointed at with the red arrow is the locknut on the freewheel/cassette side. The side of the axle with the large spacer - the left side in the picture above is the freewheel/cassette side. First remove the freewheel/cassette. Second Tighten the locknut against the cone by: ...


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