10

Yes. The cassette teeth are clearly worn, and the large chainring teeth have worn into characteristic shark fin shape. If you use new chain with these, it will skip. The small chainring looks still good.


5

There are tools that simply can't be substituted for generics. These really must be either purchased, borrowed, or if you're lucky to have a cycling cooperative near you then they will have tools to use. I'd not mess around - I'd buy the right tool, but only at the time I need it. Spoke nipple key - its too easy to round off nipples with a spanner, and ...


4

WD40 won't actually get rid of rust, though it will slow the rate at which it gets worse, for a little while. However surface rust there shouldn't lead to creaking, because nothing should be moving against it, so I'd be more concerned with checking that everything is tight that should be tight, and moving parts move freely.


3

I agree that a decent-quality plastic platform pedal like yours shouldn't crack in Boston conditions (which are not as bad as Wisconsin or Alaska!). However, if you haven't used metal-pin platform pedals before, be careful of your shins -- the pins will do a number on any flesh they dig into if your foot slips off the pedal or you put your foot down on the ...


3

Anyone with a roll of lead-based solder can hammer it out against an iron plate to make a thin foil, then wrap the cable with it, and finally "swage" it by hammering it down. The soft lead will press into the cable gaps and should create a very tight nipple. I tried this at the handlebar end with not such good results, trying to jerry-rig a cable anchor: ...


3

You shouldn't use the little adapter that you can disassemble from the tool for a square taper crank. Check, but you should find that it has a larger diameter than fits through the square hole in the cranks. It is used for Octalink, ISIS etc cranks with a larger spindle. What I think happened is you got a little way with the tool, then the adapter bottomed ...


3

Another bike, I was stripping it down for an overhaul but it turned out not to be economical to continue. Nearly everything was worn out pretty hard. There was some play in the bottom bracket. Despite being a cartridge type it disintegrated when I removed it and spilled its balls. So quite worn out. I then realised this damage on the chain stays is about ...


3

On a Hollowtech II external BB I replaced once, one of the outboard bearings had disintegrated but been successfully ignored by the owner. The metal pieces gouged a big groove into the crank spindle itself (2 piece crank) and the crankset had to be replaced. Taking care of it sooner would have saved the crankset, but in fairness it didn't seem more ...


2

It happened to me once with an old racer and a simple open cup BB. One of the cages holding the bearings decided to involve itself in the action, trapping itself between the race and the bearings. The thing became harder and harder to pedal, like someone was adding more glue with every rotation. Back-pedalling gave temporary respite, enough to get me ...


2

I have used Speedplay pedals for 19 years now, and I love them. I would also recommend that most beginners avoid them despite the fact that you can clip in on either side of the pedal. This Cyclingtips article appears to back me up. Speedplays have small bearings, and they need to be serviced with a grease gun annually. This can be a little messy, as the ...


2

I have owned own a Park Tool version of this tool since 1988, and it has given me great results. If your tool works like mine, here is how to use it: After removing the cap from the crank, one side of that threaded cylinder should thread down into the crank. Screw it in all the way. Then take the handle park and screw it into the cylinder. Eventually you ...


2

It seems that from their photos, you have the correct setup. Structurally, it also makes sense as the longer rear of the clamp supports the part of the saddle that you'll sit on, though it would also make sense to rotate the top clamp to assign its beefier 'claw' to the front, which also undergoes a larger vertical cantilever force. If you want to be sure, ...


2

WD-40 is a penetrating oil. It will happily creep past the seals of the bottom bracket and thin out the grease lubricating your bottom bracket bearings. Once the grease has thinned, it won't lubricate the bearings as well, and it will want to work its way back out the same way the WD-40 got in in the first place. You'll end up needing to repack the BB more ...


2

To me you can try to, in this order: change the chain and the largest chainring (completely worn), at least, change the cassette. You must be aware that in such a case, the best is to get a new full transmission (cassette+chain+rings), to be sure. Depending on the usage, you may then change the chain only for 2/3 times without touching rings and cassette. ...


1

I would replace the twisted link with a master link (aka a powerlink) which is normally used as a chain joiner. Then I'd ride the bike. I'd ride it into the ground and wear it out as far as possible. When the chains starts slipping then I'd change the cassette, chain, large-chainring, and I'd check the jockey wheels too. Yes its an expense, but you'll ...


1

There are four options for you, from lowest cost to highest: Bend back the chain. It might eventually break, though, and risk you falling over if you are pedaling standing up at the time. Repair the chain. Either buy a separate repair link, or buy a similar enough chain and take one link from it and put it in place of the bent one. You can then ride it ...


1

The creaking could be from the bottom bracket. you should first assure that your crank arms are properly tight on the bottom bracket spindle, then ride. If you hear creaking, then check the bottom bracket.


1

Air pressures in Marzocchi Bomber All Mountain forks are between 2.0 & 4.5 bar. The range is suggested and based on rider weight. Obviously, desired sag is a factor in your choice of pressure as well. I've copied the chart from a 2006 Bomber AM maintenance guide. I can't find the web link at the moment. The use of commas and periods is confusing to ...


1

First of all try to use the pump without any tire attached to it. If it works fine, check that the tire valve is not blocked. It might be that you have forgotten to unscrew the head, if there is a threaded cap, or the valve is stuck and you need to loosen it by pushing it down manually with the cap stem.


1

If I understand correctly you're feeling the same pressure on the compression stroke as the extension stroke? The mini dual g pumps air during both compression and extension strokes so this would be normal behaviour https://www.topeak.com/global/en/products/pumps/239-mini


1

If you wanted to stay with Deore, I still see M591 and M592 9-speed Deore rear derailleurs in the shops (a direct successor to your M581). Those are older series, but will be Deore-level. You want the SGS version. Even my old M772 Shadow XT appears to be available. That works to me very well.


1

You can in fact use any modern Shimano derailleur for 7, 8 or 9 speeds that meets the total capacity and largest sprocket requirements. The reason is that Shimano used the same cable actuation ratio (ratio of cable length pulled to lateral cage movement) for MTB groups below 10 speeds. If you want a derailleur that works as well as possible, get the current ...


1

Thanks for the great tip above. I turned out that there was a little plastic ring on top that I could peal of by using a utility knife. Then I could remove the race and access the bearings! Unfortunately cleaning those did not remove the crackling noise. So I ended up removing the cups as mentioned above anyway and taking it all apart. It turned out it was ...


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