23

I think your pedal is a lost cause. Even if you did get it off in the current condition, reinstalling and later removal will make later-you hate current-you. I would disassemble the pedal from the outside - remove the axle cap, locknut, cone, and bearings, then slide the pedal cage outboard. You may have a second set of bearings inboard, or a bushing. The ...


10

I would try removing the crank and clamping the pedal in a bench vise. With the pedal pointed downward and held very firmly in the vise, you’d then try to turn the crank clockwise. Otherwise, the specific model of left crank is not essential. You just need it to be a 175 mm Left Hollowtech II crank arm. Some cranks have different q-factors, so you’ll want ...


7

I know this situation myself. The pedal shaft is hardened steel. It will win. Taking into account what you tried, expect the thread in the crank to be lost even if you get the pedal off, eventually. So my recommendation: Get a spare left crank from your repair shop. It will save you a lot of time and headache. One more: When mounting pedals, use loads of ...


4

There's a few different Crossmax/Crossride/Crosswhatever iterations for how you get to the freehub guts to service it. For the one you have, I think your probably just pull off the endcaps, or take them off with a 5mm wrench on each end if there are such wrench flats there. You don't have to take the cassette off; I always do anyway, but it's fine not to if ...


4

I have been in this position before. This is what finally worked for me: Take off the crank, put it in a big and stable vise. Alternatively, bolt it to something solid. Drill a hole through the pedal shaft and put a nail/bolt through it to give the wrench extra grip Use the biggest wrench you can find. A monkey wrench with a long lever is the best choice. ...


4

I know it’s an old question, but I just received my bleeding kit, and I was wondering the same thing. I looked up ‘syringe’ on Amazon, all of them have markings saying ‘discard after use’ or ‘single-use only’, regardless of their intended purpose, including some where the description clearly states that they’re reusable, like the ones meant for cleaning a ...


3

The above photo is NOT the correct orientation of the negative plate. This type of negative plate fits into the air spring, left stanchion with the wide open side facing up into the stanchion. One clue it was wrong (I installed it as shown in the picture--upside down) was loss of travel. When the fork is put together, I had just 100mm of exposed stanchion, ...


3

There's a great discussion of chains and lubrication at https://www.sheldonbrown.com/chains.html His cleaning method, water and citrus-based cleaner in a soda bottle, is fast, convenient, neat, and highly effective. It gets grease off and grit out of the chain. The dirty water and cleaner can go down the drain. Then you can drip dry or heat if you're in a ...


3

Welcome to galvanic corrosion + threading hell. I'm sorry for your loss. Alll of the above seem solid, but I'd go slightly differently. Remove Crank Arm and secure into vise/clamped to table Lock pair of vise grips onto where the original pedal wrench flats were. Slip cheater bar (any strong metal pole) over the vice grip handles for turning it Attempt to ...


1

Use pipe wrench with small pipe to extend leverage. Once pedal comes off proceed to inspect crank arm threads. Try using correct tap and run it through to freshen up threads. Install new pedal. If you can't tap thread , try a Heli Coil kit to match thread size.


1

Do you have access to a drill? buy a screw extractor (AKA easy out) bit and drill through the pedal spindle (from the back side). I am not sure the crank will be usable: it seems to me that the pedal was wrongly installed. I second the suggestion of get a compatible replacement.


1

TIG weld some piece of metal bar to the pedal axle. Or use some strong, long, plumber specific pliers like Knipex Cobra 400, or 560 mm, those are realy self-locking - will bite into the axle.


1

Yes - there are several ways to alter the relationship of the caliper to the rim, but they all have downsides of adding flex or more complexity to the brake system. Drop the pads down The suggestion of filing has been made, that that's okay if you only need a millimetre. Depending on the beefiness of the metal, you may not have a lot remaining. Enter the ...


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