23

I think your pedal is a lost cause. Even if you did get it off in the current condition, reinstalling and later removal will make later-you hate current-you. I would disassemble the pedal from the outside - remove the axle cap, locknut, cone, and bearings, then slide the pedal cage outboard. You may have a second set of bearings inboard, or a bushing. The ...


19

In my experience - breakage is not directly correlated to wear. I've had bikes with unknown mileage on them, and have chosen to ride the transmission into the ground. Generally the performance slowly deteriorates, with chain slip under power being a sign that things are getting bad. Unlike other answerers, I've never had a worn transmission break and strand ...


16

There are different things that can cause this problem and different tools and techniques that can be used to fix it, depending on the cause and severity. Frame material cannot be left out of the conversation. Between steel, aluminum, and carbon, the problems and acceptable solutions are all different. Carbon should usually be approached with elbow grease ...


14

Despite the "hell will freeze over" warnings (it doesn't) it is worth considering why you ride a bike, and why you ride an 11- or 12-speed bike when a 9 speed will do the job just fine before going too deeply into the cost vs performance tradeoffs of when to change the chain. You are clearly aware the that shifting performance will deteriorate once ...


13

It was the right thing to use the lube for the chain. I do not know the particular product but in general spray lubes have the tendency to become too plentiful on the outside of the chain. This film of lube will become sticky as the solvents in the spray are dissolved. The grinding noise from the drive train may come from sand or grit sticking to the ...


13

Yes. The cassette teeth are clearly worn, and the large chainring teeth have worn into characteristic shark fin shape. If you use new chain with these, it will skip. The small chainring looks still good.


13

If doing the work by yourself, and your are satisfied with the frame, never. If you replace the whole bike, you have to purchase each and every of its parts in a package. Usually the package is not very good: for example, many manufacturers save money by using non-Shimano parts in a less visible location like wheel hub. Those wheel hubs will be hard to ...


12

When you suffer damage that can't be repaired economically. Example: I have cracked the frame on three bikes in the last decade, all in the area of the seatpost clamp and all because my saddle is excessively high. Steel mountain bike, rigid. This bike was stripped and the frame dumped because I had another, larger, used frame waiting for assembly. Of ...


12

In the ideal case, the chain will not actually be rubbing significantly against the chainrings under load. As the chain wears, the spacing between the chain links becomes different from the tooth spacing, and this difference in spacing means that there is sliding contact as the teeth engage the chain. The rollers inside the chain help to convert some of this ...


11

I would start by just trying to pump up the tires and see if they hold air. Then put some basic lubricating oil on the chain and gears. That should be enough to make it basically rideable so you can use it. Once you are riding, you can decide what is most urgent to work on next.


11

Check for burrs (a small ‘lip’ of material) on the inside edge of the top of the seat tube). That’s probably what is scratching the seat post. If you stick you finger carefully in the top if the seat tube you should be able to feel any burrs, but be careful as they can be sharp. These can be gently filed or sanded away. If the inside of the seat tube or ...


11

How important is torque wrench on this? It's not important at all. The cassette lockring just has to be tight enough to not come off as it's not doing anything other than keeping the cassette from sliding off - some cassette lockrings are even make of aluminum. Use a long wrench and put a bit of force behind it and you'll be fine.


10

I would try removing the crank and clamping the pedal in a bench vise. With the pedal pointed downward and held very firmly in the vise, you’d then try to turn the crank clockwise. Otherwise, the specific model of left crank is not essential. You just need it to be a 175 mm Left Hollowtech II crank arm. Some cranks have different q-factors, so you’ll want ...


9

The rough side should face the frame dropout. The roughness is designed to increase friction with the frame dropouts. This type of knurling works because the frame dropouts are un-hardened, either low-allow steel or aluminum. On the other hand the knurled washer is probably hardened (or at least harder) steel. Thus the knurling can 'bite' into the softer ...


9

The first thing I would do is assess the question of what happens if your efforts result in the eyelet threads getting wrecked. Is the eyelet and its welded connection chunky enough to fix it by helicoiling? Look at a helicoil tap chart. Does it have enough meat to handle a 6.145mm hole in it? Then look around a little at the ti framebuilding suppliers to ...


8

All the functionality degradation symptoms of worn chains given in other answers here do not mention one more, possibly more psychological or ergonomic aspect of it. Namely the drivetrain noise. A heavily worn chain will be loud. No amount of lubricant will silence it for longer than a short period of time. Elongated chain links will rub along the teeth. The ...


8

Wipe the chain down with a rag to remove dirt and old lube. Apply lube while spinning the chain. I tend to use quite a bit (a small drop on every second chain link or so). It’s cheap and the next step takes care of any excess. Wipe down with a rag before the next ride. In dry weather it can be sufficient to do step 1 only and skip applying new lube for a ...


7

It will seize which is why you are feeling the stiffness you are right now. It will also probably handle rough roads less effectively. I would recommend doing the maintenance and that way you could get another trouble free decade out of it or just keep riding it until the wheels fall off of it figuratively speaking. I am surprised the fork seals have held so ...


7

The bolt is called pinch bolt, that's the standard name. It is a 5mm steel Allen bolt of 6 to 10mm in length, of the same type that is used with bottle cages. Alternatively a bolt with a hexagonal head may be used as a stop-gap. The loss gets a bit 'hairier' since you've lost the cable pinching plate as well. It might require some hunting for a suitable part ...


7

I'll preface this with the fact that I ride in a cold/wet climate and prefer riding bikes to cleaning them, so this is purely what works for me. On my winter bikes, I use cheap components, a thick/heavy wet lube and then largely ignore maintenance, otherwise i'd spend half my life cleaning bikes. I accept this is wearing components more quickly, but a ...


7

I know this situation myself. The pedal shaft is hardened steel. It will win. Taking into account what you tried, expect the thread in the crank to be lost even if you get the pedal off, eventually. So my recommendation: Get a spare left crank from your repair shop. It will save you a lot of time and headache. One more: When mounting pedals, use loads of ...


6

You are correct, the pins have an interference fit in the outer plates only. When a regular pin is forced out the hole in the outer plate is enlarged. The reinforced replacement pin has a slightly greater diameter than the regular pins and so forms a interference fit in the outer plate again. This is why you cannot replace the reinforced pin. If a outer link ...


6

The master link on the picture looks properly closed. Master links for 8- and 9-speed chains often do not require tools to open them, while 10/11/12/13-speed chains are better approached with special pliers. Be, of course, sure that you use a master link that matches your chain and is not too wide, e.g. an 8-speed one for 8-speed chain, 9-speed for 9-speed ...


6

Chains, cassettes, and chainrings are replaced to avoid sudden and catastrophic failure of the drivetrain. Sure, the chain might just slip a little, which might not be catastrophic, but catastrophic consequences are easily possible if something should suddenly and unexpectedly break. For starters, imagine what might happen if the rider were pedaling at full ...


6

You do not need to oil after every ride. Depending on the type of lubricant you use, you may only need to lube every 500 miles/800 km. There are two general categories of lubes: dry and wet. Wet lubes are oily, dry lubes are waxes suspended in a liquid carrier that evaporates. Wet lubes typically last longer but can wash off in the rain; dry lubes are ...


5

There are tools that simply can't be substituted for generics. These really must be either purchased, borrowed, or if you're lucky to have a cycling cooperative near you then they will have tools to use. I'd not mess around - I'd buy the right tool, but only at the time I need it. Spoke nipple key - its too easy to round off nipples with a spanner, and ...


5

This is the compression ring. It does the same thing as the silver one on the Colnago in your picture. Your fork is stuck because it's wedged in too tight. You need to whack the top of the steerer hard with something that won't hurt it, and you need to have the fork off the ground while you're doing that. Hit it as though you're trying to send it flying out ...


5

I'm going to give chain waxing with PTFE and paraffin a shot as I'm sick of filthy dirty hands when I get a puncture. Carry a pair of disposable nitrile gloves if this is your only reason for waxing. A lot less hassle! I've read quite about about the process of cleaning the chain and applying the wax and PTFE. What I'm not clear on is do I put any lube or ...


5

I have done this exact thing, and it continues today due to lack of parts availability. (Cannondale F700 from 2000, my daily commuter bike). My chain and sprockets are so worn, they will only work with each other. The distance between chain rollers has increased and the sprocket teeth have worn to little points. I tried a new chain but it just jumps off ...


5

It can be hard with bikes to speak with certainty about what name choice wins the title for most historically official or accepted, and it also always depends on how far back you want to count and where and in what langauges and what transalates to what and where and when etc, but "anchor bolt" probably gets it for all bolts that fasten gear and ...


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