New answers tagged

1

Several times it happened to me that I had to vigorously step on the lever which was connected to the sprocket tool. Hold the wheel firmly and step on the lever with as much force as possible. Be careful and observe the objects in the likely continuation of the movement of your leg. Be careful to not injure yourself by the sprocket teeth. Some initial ...


1

I don't think you have the right tool to remove the locking ring. I think you might need a SunRace Freewheel Lockring Tool, but on second thought, that doesn't look right either. Like Jahaziel says, make your own.


2

It seems like a Freewheel, not a cassette. If you do not have a vise, as suggested in JoeK's answer, my suggestion is to strap the rim as firmly as possible to a heavy bench or other solid object, so you can apply greater force with both hands to the wrench. If the tool slips out, use a quick release skewer or the axle with a nut to hold the tool in place I ...


7

Secure tool in sturdy bolted-down bench vise. The flats should be in the jaws, with the splines pointing upward. Lower your wheel onto the tool so the splines engage. Unscrew (counter-clockwise) wheel from freewheel (yours is not a cassette!). Can take some heaving. You will have more grip and leverage if the tyre is installed and inflated.


1

This is a somewhat bike dependant answer, and I wouldn't recommend it on expensive components, but for my winter bike I use the zero maintenance approach. I have a cheap single speed MTB. I use a cheap rust resistant chain. It gets lubed once with a heavy wet lube when it goes on, and then its maintenance free thereafter until it is replaced in autumn for ...


5

Waxing a chain is the lowest overall cost. I bought 5kg of plain unscented paraffin wax for $25, and after 3 years have not used up the first kilogram. The only tool needed is some kind of boiler. I use an electric frypan that had lost it's non-stick coating and was no longer suitable for food. You could even melt the wax in a dedicated saucepan on a ...


-7

Here is description of my approach. Certainly this is not the only possible approach and there are probably infinitely many ways to lubricate a chain. Yet, I think my way of lubricating a chain probably gets very near the lowest possible total cost. I already know it gives 4000 km chain life for 110kg rider on an e-bike and does so at very minimal amount of ...


12

Michael's answer is good - there isn't enough space for a full size nut. But this leads to the next question. Instead of having special wrenches why not just use normal nuts and get the spacing from somewhere else? You'd have to make the hub flanges narrower or the drop outs wider and the axle longer. Everything is a trade-off. If you make the flanges ...


18

Isn’t it simply because there is not enough space for normal nuts/wrenches without increasing dropout-width? You don’t need full-size nuts because those cones and nuts don’t really need much torque. It’s not done to limit torque, it’s simply exploiting the low torque requirements to build narrower.


0

I am truing a rotor right now and it started with enough brake rub to stop the wheel from free spinning in a stand. I didn't get a number but estimate it had over 2mm of runout. After 15 minutes of rough tweaking, it has 0.16mm of runout. This results in slight pad rub for me. The rotor visibly wobbles when the wheel is free-spun. Finally after another 30 ...


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