New answers tagged

1

Sounds like you'd lost the locknut, allowing the outside cone to back off slowly, then walk right out the end pushing the dust cap with it and freeing all the ball bearings. Perhaps you didn't tighten the locknut against the conenut and they moved as a unit? Mismatched balls can push on the cone too, specially if there's spalling or pitting developing ...


3

I suspect that the splitting triangle is the only MAFAC bit that were often used for that purpose. The Mafac 'Racer' brakes are quite different, look them up in a search engine. I remember them well from my teenage years' Peugeot. These look like traditional cantilever brakes formerly used by crossers and on early MTB. However it seems that there is a bit ...


2

A long time leader and innovator in rim brake materials is KoolStop. Kool Stop makes a variety of "Smooth Post Cantilever" pad holder that should fit your application. They even make replacement pads for your original holders. I personally would use a modern holder with a modern pad compound. It will give superior performance over the older stock ...


2

You don't say specifically what your set up problems are but when training mechanics we recommend starting with the fundamentals and then working upwards, not skipping steps or assuming that things are correct, that may later prove not to be. That potentially saves you from a lot of lost time trying to get something to work where you have an undetected, ...


3

The H-screw aka b-tension aka angle adjustment is meant to be adjusted in the lowest gear position for any rear derailleur where the guide pulley is offset from the cage pivot, which is most of them, including this. The manufacturer recommended distance will always be for that position. For conventional road derailleurs like this, that 5mm number really ...


1

As Grigory already said, master links for 8 and 9-speed chains can often be opened or closed by hand. I believe this is because the clearances between the chain components (e.g. the pins and rollers) are larger than on higher-speed chains. One minor thing about the original question struck me: the poster referred to pedaling their bike upside down. This ...


6

The master link on the picture looks properly closed. Master links for 8- and 9-speed chains often do not require tools to open them, while 10/11/12/13-speed chains are better approached with special pliers. Be, of course, sure that you use a master link that matches your chain and is not too wide, e.g. an 8-speed one for 8-speed chain, 9-speed for 9-speed ...


2

Shimano stamps the rear derailleur model number on the underside/lower plate of the parallelogram. All models for the last several decades.


3

Definitely one of the models in the Shimano Tourney range. You don't need to know exact model to replace it. You just need to know what specs the replacement derailleur needs. You can look at the derailleur models in the Tourney lines in the Shimano Line-Up pages (you might find you exact model by comparing pictures also). All the specs are pretty self-...


2

After a couple of email exchanges with Campagnolo technical services of North America, I've confirmed that I correctly installed the new free hub (but you should do this carefully, as the pawls and/or spring can be damaged with too much pressure or twisting). The technician confirmed that the new bearings could be a bit stiff as they "break in", ...


0

Found the solution. Heres how you remove it:


1

Unfortunately the mechanic didn't express the issue very well to you, or used vocabulary that you haven't come across before, but the best person to ask for clarification is that mechanic. He is the only one of us who has been hands on with the bike. I would expect normal headset adjustment to be part of a tune up, and the fact you say he tightened something,...


1

The tube you’ve circled is the head tube. Inside the tube, on the top and bottom are the headset bearings which allow your fork to turn smoothly. The bearing play or preload has to be set correctly with the vertical screw on top of the stem cap. If there is play in the bearings allowing the fork to rock back and forth you’ll have to adjust the preload. To do ...


2

I can tell from your post you are not adverse to repairing a bike. That's great, I worked in a bike shop and know the feeling that you get when working on a bike with your own hands. Economical as that craft can be you're right, there is a point at which you need to examine the trade off between buying parts and buying a new bike. I think there are a lot of ...


3

My evaluations, that may apply or not to you, are the following: commuting bike: as long as the cost per year in new parts is less than one half of the cost of the yearly commuter pass on public transport, I am good with that (given where I live, in the german speaking part of the world, practically it means that only a cracked frame may cost more than the ...


12

When you suffer damage that can't be repaired economically. Example: I have cracked the frame on three bikes in the last decade, all in the area of the seatpost clamp and all because my saddle is excessively high. Steel mountain bike, rigid. This bike was stripped and the frame dumped because I had another, larger, used frame waiting for assembly. Of ...


13

If doing the work by yourself, and your are satisfied with the frame, never. If you replace the whole bike, you have to purchase each and every of its parts in a package. Usually the package is not very good: for example, many manufacturers save money by using non-Shimano parts in a less visible location like wheel hub. Those wheel hubs will be hard to ...


5

This is the compression ring. It does the same thing as the silver one on the Colnago in your picture. Your fork is stuck because it's wedged in too tight. You need to whack the top of the steerer hard with something that won't hurt it, and you need to have the fork off the ground while you're doing that. Hit it as though you're trying to send it flying out ...


6

You are correct, the pins have an interference fit in the outer plates only. When a regular pin is forced out the hole in the outer plate is enlarged. The reinforced replacement pin has a slightly greater diameter than the regular pins and so forms a interference fit in the outer plate again. This is why you cannot replace the reinforced pin. If a outer link ...


2

That looks like an integrated crown race for sure. Does the rest of the headset use integrated bearings as well? If so, that would also reinforce my suspicion. It's certainly safe because you've been riding for years already without issue.


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