27

Unfortunately, most bikes are only rated to 300lbs or less. However, if this is a new bike, you should take it back to the shop and get them to fix it. They can't claim they didn't know you were a heavy rider when they sold you the bike. You might need to get more substantial wheels with more spokes. Wheels designed for touring bikes might be more ...


17

There are many possible causes of creaking. But Deemar has the most likely reason in this case - the cranks are loose on the axle. Think about how a creak is produced. It's one item sliding over another. But instead of sliding it's repeatedly sticking then jumping. The amount of movement might only be a fraction of a millimetre. The OP would have noticed if ...


14

Such a hub exists for trike and quads . Pedal forward with 3 or 5 gears then having a coaster brake to stop . At full stop with the brake engaged continued backward pedal pressure will cause the cycle will move in reverse in a reduced gear . Sturmey-Archer has made these hubs for the niche market (velomobiles ) for some years now . The hubs have a sprocket ...


12

Assuming you want the center of gravity of the bike alone (not with a rider), there is a very simple procedure you can perform yourself, as long as you have some bike (you could borrow one): For simplicity, strap the front wheel to the down tube of the bike, so the handlebars won't turn; You could also strap the brake levers in the "full braking" position; ...


12

Here's how I would fix the problem. This could all be done by somebody with basic tools and basic knowledge. Get a quill-threadless stem adapter and a new stem. This will allow you to fit the new stem to the handlebars without removing anything from the bars. The old stem can be removed destructively by removing the cinch bolt and prying the thing apart ...


11

As already said, Shimano used to manufacture Silient Clutch rear hub. But that has been stopped a few years ago, so if you manage to source one - you are lucky man. I used to have one of them and it was truly silent. It was heavier than standard shimano LX hub, but it was silent and with instant engagement. Also I used Chris King hubs. If you put a lot of ...


11

I completely agree with the accepted answer of @David Richerby from personal experience. As a heavier rider (~22 stone) for many years, I also found with a couple of different bicycles that the rear wheel tended to come out of true, especially when hitting bumps and potholes. My solution was to replace the rear wheel with a touring wheel with more spokes, ...


10

While it may be possible, by creating a mechanism that shifts the chain from one freewheel to another, or disconnecting one temporarily through mechanical actuators, the hassle and engineering it would take to make happen would be outweighed by the fact that it is almost entirely pointless. A fixed gear would be your best bet as it already does that. ...


10

What you have now is a bit of a hack, but it could be good temporarily so long as you don't over-stress things somehow, and if you can tolerate the lower handlebar. (Note, I haven't seen how your stem is cracked and so can't tell how bad the situation is.) It's not likely to fail catastrophically (so long as you're not hot-dogging on the thing) but the ...


9

I'd try a screw remover like these. You'll need to either get a set or bring the bolt in to make sure you get the right size (Sears sells their own version that's supposed to be excellent). The good ones have a left-hand thread and a small cutting head to bite into the bead of the bolt; this looks like a really good candidate for a screw remover since the ...


9

This is not going to work. You won't permanently change the shape of the rim by just smooshing it between two concrete discs, as in order to permanently bend metal you need to exceed the yield stress of the metal and plastically deform it. This means that to bend something to a shape, it has to be precisely bent further than its ultimate designed bend, then ...


9

The main limiting factor is chainstay clearance. If your chainrings touch the chainstay it will wear and weaken and eventually fail. So the first thing is google your bike frame and see what maximum size chainring its rated for. Do this first. Once you have that info, get onto Sheldon's gear calculator https://www.sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html and ...


8

It is possible to make the switch, but there are a few components that probably won't be an even swap. This will depend on the vintage of the frame you're planning on using (and it really should be steel as aluminum doesn't age gracefully). Since I have a steel 1992 Bridgestone RB-T, I'll use it as an example. The headset on your bike is most certainly 1 1/...


8

You are correct. This is different than "regular" cables. On regular cables you pick the end you want and cut off the other. Thats because the connection on the cut-off end is usually a clamp. You run the cable under a screw/nut and tighten it down. Then you just put a cable crimp on the end to protect the cut cable However, your internal hub cable is ...


8

That's a nice looking bike, it seems like it would be a great start for your project. The big question is whether or not the bike fits you – if it does it will be worth considering what else you could do to make the bike into a dependable commuter / day touring bike. Start by trying to get the saddle and handlebars into a position where you are comfortable ...


8

Here's a version of you picture with labels on the parts I'm probably not using the correct names but these will work for this purpose. I'm assuming you know where each part generally fits but are having trouble getting the caliper to function correctly when assembled. The caliper basically works by rotating the plunger. The ball bearings fit into the ...


8

The tools being used there are: Bottom bracket tool Large socket to engage with the large hex head on the BB tool Sliding T-handle socket driver Some bottom bracket tools such as the Park BBT-22 have a 3/8 socket drive built in, so the large socket isn't necessary.


8

Spokes getting loose is not a laughing matter. The more spokes get loose or break, the more uneven the load is distributed to the spokes, and the more likely other spokes are to get loose or break. Accumulate enough failed spokes, and your wheel fails. And failed spokes after only 24km means that something is very wrong with the wheel's built. As such, your ...


7

It depends on how you buy the brake, so you need to check whats coming with what you're buying. Typically, you get the caliper+pads+rotor+mounting hardware and buy the brake lever (which is a V-brake lever most of the time unless its a road brake in which case its a regular short pull lever) separately along with the cables+housing. In some cases though (esp....


7

Presumably you have drop bars. Inline brake levers are your only choice. The only places to mount extra levers on drop bars are tops. With inline levers installed you can reach levers from the drops, hoods and tops, so you really don't need levers anywhere else.


6

Police / Law Enforcement bikes often have a quiet freehub. This Cannondale Law Enforcement bicycle refers to it as a "Silent Clutch Rear Hub" and specifically mentions "R085" as a model number (further googling suggests it's a Shimano).


6

I had this same problem but i went to a bike shop and explained the situation, the bike mechanic gave me a serrated washer to be placed between the skewer and the bike frame on the cassette side. This solved the issue


6

There are a number of factors to consider when buying a new wheel set: Wheel size, there are many different wheel sizes to choose from, modern road bikes are generally 700c and mountain bikes 26, 27.5 or 29inch. There's also a number of legacy, children's and specialty sizes. Rim width, rim width determines how wide a tire you can run and is determined by ...


6

According to this link the thermal expansion of aluminum 6061 is 13 micro inches/(inch x °F). A headset has a diameter of 1.125 inches, and circumference of 3.5325 inches. Assuming you change the temperature of the headset from 70°F (room temperature) to 0°F (typical household freezer), you'll change the circumference by 13 x 70 x 3.5325 = 3215.5 micro ...


6

To answer the question shortly: yes, it is normal. When braking, the inertia of the rider (and the bike) causes the load on the rear tire to decrease. It leads to lower friction against the surface, and possibly skidding. In extreme cases, when braking with the front brake, the rear tire is lifed off the ground completely. Especially in fast mountain ...


6

Usually what causes this (literally no braking, firm lever feel, lever nowhere close to bottoming) is an error in brake setup or adjustment wherein the brake caliper's armature is being pulled to the end of its range of motion before full braking power is reached, or in some cases before any braking power is generated. This can happen either as a result of ...


6

I have TRP spyres and while I find they perform better than BB7's when properly adjusted, they are very sensitive to adjustment. They have a very narrow range between rubbing the disk and too far away for proper braking. You may have to put up with a slight bit of rub to get proper braking performance. While they are dual actuated[1] like hydraulic disk ...


6

Its not a master link - that's probably the one-use pin that was used to close the chain the first time. This is what a Shimano pin looks like after its been snapped off. There's a clear difference to show this pin should not be pushed out again because the plate holes will be enlarged slightly. Your one doesn't look quite the same - it does look like a ...


6

I would use the same techniques as used on rusted hardware. Liberally apply a penetrating oil (liquid wrench, PB Blaster, CRC Knocker Loose). Use a penetrating oil not a lubricant to break them loose. With the nuts being so small you can soak them in a small container for several days. Then hold the flange with pliers while turning the nut with a wrench. ...


6

For your weight, you either need to find reliable wheel builder who will make wheels for you, or you need to become one. Possibly both in that order. Wheel will be most important part of your bicycle and you should strive to put best components in it, and be sure it is built with your weight in mind. Unwinding of spokes is almost certainly result of not ...


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