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*Shifted from the follow-up post: Are road mechanical disc brakes safe to pair with a steel gravel bike Disclaimer: It's not unsafe in my experience but I am unsure how safe this setup is, so perform this at your own risk. Some manufacturers advise against this for certain brake models (i.e. TRP's hybrid hydraulics/mechnaical brake - some content creator on ...


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My first thought is that you were pairing road levers with mountain brakes. If the levers pull relatively little cable, but the brakes are designed for a lot of cable travel, you'll have bad results, as Michael mentioned. However, it's also possible that you've just got bad brakes (you don't say what they are). If the force you put into the brake levers is ...


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I will assume that they're compatible, i.e. that the brake calipers are a road model. Pad choice is not part of the equation in determining bite point or lever travel. Its influence on power is primarily under sustained heavy braking, and since more aggressive pads have downsides in terms of noise and rotor wear, you should usually only go to them when you ...


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Edit: Per your other question you have Microshift Advent X STI style shifters. I assume it’s the ADVENT X Drop Bar Shifters 1x10 SB-M100A. You also mention Tektro MD-C510 disc brake calipers. Both brifters and calipers have the usual road brake cable pull. So it can’t be an incompatibility. On the internet one can read a lot of complaints about the Tektro ...


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The part is the aluminum washer/shim that's used between the cassette lockring and smallest cog. For some reason it isn't centered, thus it has been damaged. Most likely it's damaged so much that it needs to be thrown away. You get new one by purchasing a new lockring, and the new washer/shim should be centered. The same (or possibly similar but not exactly ...


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Do you mean the lockring? The circle with all the words on it is essentially a big nut, that threads on and holds the cassette on the splines. Without a locknut, the cassette could move left and right on the freehub body, and it could hit then bind on the inside of the dropouts. If the cassette was free to move, then the slack will increase wear on your ...


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I am presuming its very slight rubbing that is not noticeably affecting the wheels free rotation. What type of bike? FS MTB, super light roadie? Worn bushes or light flexible frame may cause a small amount of auditable rubbing under load. The loss of energy form this is tiny, and as long as its only happening under cornering (when energy loss is occurring ...


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The rotor should be flat and co-planar with the hub mounting face, which should be at a right angle to the axle's center line. Replacing the rotor won't fix issues with the axle or play in the bearings, so check those out before buying parts. I've used a dial travel indicator to get a rotor completely orthogonal to the axle, and still had rub because the ...


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I am going to assume you're talking about a stripped post mount. As others have said, don't ride even a little with only one bolt. That risks overloading the remaining bolt and causing a brake failure and/or additional damage to the parts. In some instances they can get stripped because someone put in too short of a bolt. If it's only a matter of a ...


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You do not have two bolts for safety (i.e. if one fails, you have another one). You have two (or more) bolts because each one is fundamental. When one is gone, the brake will not function properly and soon also the other bolt(s) will strip/break. Stop riding that fork.


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Regardless of whats wrong - a brake is a critical component of your bike and you should not take risks. If your brakes are malfunctioning, stop riding the bike until its fixed. Don't be tempted to take the brake off and ride anyway, that's foolish. The common fix for a stripped thread is to install a thread insert, often called a "helicoil" But ...


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