Hot answers tagged

42

Bicycle mirrors are going fall into two basic categories- the type that you mount somewhere on your bike and the type that you mount somewhere on your head. Both categories have their pros and cons, but many of them are subjective. A pro to one individual may be considered a con to the next. Within those two categories you have a variety of different options ...


18

Make your bike less accessible. Don't park it near where people walk past. Instead, park it down the row a little. Avoid parking it anywhere that will be in anyone's way—inconvenienced people may take it out on your bike. Park your bike in a secure location if possible. That means not leaving it outside overnight; ideally bring it into a lockable ...


17

Yes, they exist, though they are expensive and meant for racing rather than for general purpose riding on regular roads. One example is the View Speed Cyclops glasses. They take a lot of getting used to but in the arcane world of time-trial racing they have their adherents.


14

There's no permanent fix, nor is there anything truly theftproof. In my experience, if a thief tries to steal something which is not easy to steal, they will just break it in fustration. Which will make your life harder when it comes to removing the broken bracket. I would just buy the cheapest one I could find, and maybe paint the back of it an ugly ...


11

As I've mentioned in the comments, I've got mirrors on a couple of my bikes: a Zefal Spin on the tourer and a Busch & Müller Cyclestar on the hybrid. Both are convex, and cover a wide area, and both mount on the end of the bars. They're very useful, though mainly for keeping up awareness of the situation. The B&M in particular sits quite far out and ...


9

I would say that there's not much more concern of the mirror gouging your eye out than your glasses in the event of an accident. Ultimately I think if you did a risk/benefit assessment of having a mirror, you'd come out in the black. For most cycling mirrors I'd say that the mounting point is going to give way before anything breaks and becomes dangerous. If ...


8

In no particular order: Bicyclists can see around just by turning their heads. This is much more difficult when wearing a motorcycle helmet or inside car. Bicycle handlebar is in a difficult position for actually looking through the mirror. On drop bar bike changing position would require adjusting the mirror. City and road bikes that would benefit most ...


8

To add to jm2's post, there's also a mirror that is integrated into a bar: Advantages: Foldable, unobtrusive, usage as bar Disadvantage: Small mirror => very limited field of vision


7

I have several bikes, one of which is a recumbent. As such, its impossible to turn one's head and see behind while riding a recumbent. Because of this I fitted some cheap bike mirrors which were rendered useless by buzzing vibrations and that they would never hold position for long. Then I tried a helmet mirror, which was good while it was in the right ...


6

I am an Audax club member and so am mostly riding on high speed country roads - B class highways in the main. Firstly I would say that just as a good driver should be using a 'system of car control' to avoid collisions, then in exactly they same manner, and with exactly the same system, so should a bike rider. And this would be whether in the city or the ...


4

You can engrave something on your mirrors to avoid being sold after. Is a practice of car owners.


4

I would be very tempted to say that your bike isn't setup correctly for you. It shouldn't cause any back/neck issues after a long ride (although you don't say how long that is). If you handlebars/stem is of the correct length/height, then you shouldn't have any issues seeing in front of you- nor pains in these areas. To answer your question- I am unaware of ...


4

This is complicated. The farther from the eye a mirror is, the larger it must be to provide an adequate field of view. This is one of the (several) reasons that bar-mounted mirrors are often unsatisfactory. Assuming you stick with helmet-mounted, you do want to get the largest mirror you can find, and one with a relatively long arm, so you can get it as ...


4

I have used a bar-end mounted mirror for about one high-mileage year in the past, and have for the last year switched to helmet mounted. I will not consider the merit of handlebar vs. helmet mounted in detail, but I can say I would never have used the handlebar mounted one in the first place, if I knew how much, MUCH better, by so much far, the helmet ...


3

I use an eyeglass mounted mirror (I use the "Take a look" mirror, I highly recommend it), and the only time I was in an accident with it, it popped off my glasses without gouging me in the eye. Any up/down motion of the mirror is going to make it pop right off of the glasses, lateral side-to-side motion will likely just bend the metal shaft. If my face hits ...


3

Because of the tilt of the seat tube, this setup does not make for efficient pedaling. The seat is sitting over the center of the rear wheel, which moves your entire center of gravity too far to the back. You want the center of gravity to be a bit ahead of the bottom bracket, where the downward force is applied to the pedals. That's one of the two main ...


3

On a motorbike, you're travelling at the same speed as the other traffic, so the other vehicles are relatively stationary relative to you, their position is fairly stable in the the rear mirrors. On a bike, the motor traffic is moving much faster than and their position in the mirror changes very rapidly, it is much more difficult to perceive useful ...


3

I tried several different handlebar mirrors over the years. They never provided a very good view -- you often had to turn the wheel sideways to see what you wanted to see, creating a hazard. They were easily knocked askew. And they were easily blocked by panniers. An eyeglass or helmet mirror is a much better option, in most cases. The main problem is ...


2

Combination of theft proof screws. These are screws which can only be removed with a special tool. There are so many different kinds that it's impractical for a thief to have all of these. https://www.brycefastener.com/?keyword=tamperproof&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzauLx_ar5wIVWyCtBh1TXQwwEAAYASAAEgK-E_D_BwE And Locktite (or an epoxy). This is an inexpensive ...


2

I ride/rode several recumbent bikes and trikes as well as upright bikes. On both trikes I happen to have mirrors on both ends of the handle bars. On one 'bent bike I had a single mirror placed on the over seat handle bars, on the left side, looking around my body on the left side. On the other 'bent bike I do not have a mirror but use a mirror which clips ...


2

One reason that was not mentioned yet: On the road side, any accident involving the mirror is likely to be someone else's fault because they overtook too closely and it likely won't be bad, because it just scraped a car and turned the mirror in its socket. Without the mirror sticking out, people might hit your handlebar instead, which is much worse. On the ...


2

There was an attempt to kickstart a bike periscope last year. Unfortunately, Pedi-Scope has failed to reach funding goal, but person behind promised to "get in touch if he plans to relaunch the project", so link might become helpful again some day.


2

Get a large diameter helmet mirror: I have been using the Safe Zone Mirror (https://www.efficientvelo.com/home/safezone/) for three years now while riding mostly on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina. It is without question the finest piece of bicycle kit I own. When I turn my head slightly and they see the Safe Zone oversize (57mm diameter) mirror ...


2

I thought mirrors were daft - having a spikey thing up by my eyes was not an attractive proposition. A simple shoulder check works fine on an upright bike, and my ears work fine too. Later I started riding a recumbent. These make shoulder checks damn-near impossible, so mirrors are required. The main point of a mirror is that you can scan it much more ...


2

Riding recumbents I can not easily look behind me and need a mirror to actually see what is going rather than rely on hearing. When riding an upright bike I do not usually use my mirror (most bikes have one mounted on the bike, I do have a glasses mounted mirror) and I miss it the first few days. Yes, you listen and you do look behind you when you are about ...


2

I have a balaclava that's somewhat loose, and gives me the same problems. I assume the fabric of the sun drape is both interfering with the mirror as well as cutting out a bit of your peripheral vision? If this is the case, then we have the same problem. You have, essentially, three choices: What works for me is to simply pull the clava tighter against my ...


2

Beside different mounts, the mirror shape, size and convexity are also to be considered. Strongly convex ones might be good in city traffic as they give a wide field of view, but for seeing distant (but fast) cars on country roads a flat mirror is better. Also consider that some mirrors may make the handlebar wider, which can be a problem when filtering in ...


2

It's certainly possible. It could well be easy, but on the other hand you may have to modify parts quite heavily. There are decent quality mirrors designed to clamp onto handlebars and extend past your arms. I'm most familiar with the Busch und Muller cyclestar because I use a similar mirror with a different attachment. Cheap mirrors tend to wobble about and ...


1

I've managed to make the joints on a headtorch (that I use on the bike sometimes) much stiffer by wedging a rubber band in the hinge. If you can disassemble it, a bit of inner tube might do the trick, or a smear of hot glue. But if the joint can't be disassmebled it's much harder. There may still be a possiblity of wrapping a rubber band (or slice of ...


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