17

When carbon manufacturers and fabricators put holes in things, they're thinking about: Whether disrupting the continuity of the carbon layers in that way will leave it strong enough. Whether there will be enough material left to be strong enough. How to reinforce and finish the hole to avoid problems with fraying, moisture, and stress risers. The answer to ...


14

What he hammered down is the star nut. It's a gription (yes I made that word up) device that serves as an anchor point in the steer tube to allow the top cap to properly compress the headset during a headset adjustment. Old or damaged star nuts are often driven all the way through the steer tube to remove them (that's why your steer tube is open at the ...


12

Try stopping with one foot down, leaning the bike over and leaving your dominant leg on the pedal with the pedal forward and up ready for a power stroke. By leaning the bike over you can get lots of clearance. I can often even remain on the saddle. When you're ready to go, push off with your non-dominant leg (which is touching the ground) and give a strong ...


12

Generally speaking your off hand should be the front brake, so if you're right handed the front brake should be the left. They can be set up either way, though, especially if you're using cable-driven (non-hydraulic) brakes. Even with hydraulics you should have no problem making the right hand brake the rear. I would highly advise this, as in a panic ...


12

The derailleur is there to act as chain tensioner. In a frame intended for derailleur the rear wheel can't be moved to tighten the chain, so a separate spring-loaded chain tensioner is needed. The cheapest and ugliest way is to just use whatever derailleur was on the bike before conversion.


10

No need to cold-set. I have a BSO with the same problem. The rear dropouts are about 6mm too close for the hub. I can just flex them apart and let the hub in. The misalignment of the dropouts would be virtually nonexistent at 4mm flex. If you remove your wheels often, and putting the wheel on is a pain, it might be worth cold-setting your frame. Other ...


10

DO NOT DRILL HOLES IN YOUR FORKS That would weaken them substantially and run the risk of them breaking under stress (e.g., when you hit a pothole). A broken fork will probably put you in the emergency room, and potentially the morgue if you're unlucky with vehicles nearby. Hopefully, other answers will address how to fix your forks; worst case is ...


9

TL;DR: The search terms to use may be "kidback adapter," "child stoker adapter," or "child stoker kit." Googling for "tandem child bicycle crank" produced a link to Sheldon Brown's site, which had a page on tandems and children, and which had this to say: For smaller children, (or larger tandems) a "kidback"...


9

I would assume it is not safe to drill into carbon, not at that location. I am not saying that it is not safe, only that I strongly suspect so and that I am not willing to assume otherwise. To state the obvious, when you drill holes in something, you weaken the structure. A heavier fork may be overbuilt and it might be fine, but you don’t really know if the ...


8

As Blam and Batman have already suggested you will not go faster. The main reason is that your top speed is determined by the number of teeth on the smallest rear cog. The smallest cog available on a normal cluster / cassette has 11 teeth. If your smallest cog already has 11 teeth, then you will definitely not go faster with a new one. If it currently ...


8

If you adjust a bike to the max and its still significantly too small, you should sell the bike and get a new bike. There are extra long seatposts, and extra long quill stems and what not, but in all likelihood its not really worth it if the bike doesn't fit with the normal seatpost + stem; the other parts of geometry like top tube length are probably too ...


8

Looks like 70s Schauff Elite. Compare it with bike here, the frame has very distinct shapes. A similar bike is also listed at the official (correct me if I'm wrong) Schauff website, the picture under number 28.


8

The triple is irrelevant. So long as the derailleur has enough capacity(which is determined by the size of the chainrings and cogs in the back; this is basically controlling how much chain length derailleur can keep tensioned) and largest cog ratings (for clearance ratings), you can put a bigger cassette. There may be other ratings on the data sheet -- ...


8

No, just move any spacers from below the stem to on top of it. Don't cut the steerer in case you want to sell the bike later, or even if you change your mind later.


7

Yes, you can have pedelec sensors (PAS) for a front-wheel hub. We're not a shopping site but you just have to go to one of the larger vendors of kits to find one that has a front wheel PAS. PAS sensors are divided between cheap rotational sensors and more expensive ("advanced") torque sensors. PAS controllers on the whole tend to be more expensive than ...


6

Reducing friction (or grip in layman's terms) would cause your wheel to simply spin in circles when you pedal and you would fall down. Increased friction between the tire and the riding surface is the goal of nearly every tire manufacturer. You could easily coat your tire in oil to accomplish the lower friction you are talking about.


6

I was amazed the right is the front but found this Australian Standard AS1927 – 1998 Pedal Bicycles – Safety Requirements, page 16 Section 2.14 Braking System 2.14.2.1 states the following: Handbrake lever location: The brake lever for a front brake shall be positioned on the right-hand side of the handlebar, and that for a rear brake on the ...


6

Drilling a crank that old is not a great idea. They weren't that strong to begin with and 40+ years of use hasn't made then any stronger. I would not do anything to further weaken them. To be honest, if the pedals are frozen I'd think twice about using that crank. Aluminum corrosion expands and can create stress that crack the material ( similar to the way ...


6

Performed the operation today and it was, as suggested, very easy. Simply unscrewed a bolt on each side affixing the lock to the seat stays. For mine, the lock did not obstruct these bolts. I was then able to twist the ring lock and pull off the wheel, around the fenders, without any more fuss.


6

Depends what you mean by city bike and road bike. If you mean converting a bike with flat bars to one with drop bars there are issues. Flat bar bike frames are typically longer than drop bar frames, because flat bars place the rider's hands closer to the head-tube than drop bar hoods or drops hand positions do. Also, compatibility of brakes, levers/shifters ...


6

To cold set a regular fork by 30+ mm would no doubt weaken it far too much to use. The better starting point would be something like a 135 mm fat bike fork, common sizes are also listed in the Sheldon brown table you linked. Notice however, that three of the four pictures you found feature extensive modifications to strengthen the fork or supporting frame ...


6

So I don't know much about the disease you mentioned - but if the symptoms are caused by the strain on the wrists and hands, then I have a perfect but expensive solution: Switch to a recumbent. There is no weight on the hands, ever, on all recumbent types. Under seat steering handlebars allow the hands to rest next to the torso in a very relaxed fashion and ...


6

I faced exactly this question about a year ago. I did all the internet research I could, talked to bike mechanics and emailed fork builders and repairers. The answer that emerged from all this was a clear 'no'. The fork crown is subject to large forces and drilling it will weaken it unpredictably. The one thing that's worse than not having a sweet USB ...


5

If you can unlock it, it's very easy as the mounting bolts are uncovered when it's unlocked. If it is locked, then it's a bit more difficult but not much more. The lock housing you can see in the image below is just stamped metal riveted together. Some ring locks are so weak that a good whack on the locking lever will spring it open. Otherwise, the easiest ...


5

Drilling the seat tube is a bad idea, for the reasons you've indicated. Very rarely a bike shop will have a tool for reaming a seat tube (more usually framebuilders have those) that can to the task in a slightly safer way. BUT from my experience with a welded steel frame where I didn't bother to back-purge (lesson learned!), even once you weld an extension ...


5

As others said don't drill the fork, as others said go for a new/used fork they come by cheap in most countries when no suspension is needed. But if you still want to go DIY I will give you a couple approaches. What you can do instead is to put a spacer inside the fork, that way it will have no travel avaliable. You will need something like Nilon or Lexan, ...


4

I've done this by putting an 8 speed free-hub wheel with a 7 speed cassette into a bike that had a 5 speed freewheel wheel. The only issue is wheel fitting/removal - a bit of leverage to separate the dropouts and the wheel tucks in nicely. If you needed to do this on the road Murphy's Law may ambush you and make it fiddly. Mounting the wheel square is ...


4

If you want to go 9 speed, you'll need a Shimano-compatible 9 speed shifter for the rear (i.e. the right shifter). You'll also want a 9 speed chain. Your hub should be fine for the cassette swap. And the 9 speed cassette, of course. In terms of how much faster you should go, possibly none. You really need to keep up a good cadence most likely and you'd be ...


4

I doubt you will find a way to do this; it would require a shoe with a pretty deep sole to recess the cleats into (that's what SPDs do). Note that the SPD-SLs are pretty similar to the Looks but much more walkable.


4

My VidaXL yellow/black soft bag trailer wore the tyres due to parachuting effect caused by the empty compartment and top cover letting wind inside. Also the axle retainers were wrong way round promoting too much toe out, I flipped them over and there is some toe-in, that decrease when pulled along. I now leave top cover off empty trailer so wind doesn't drag ...


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