4

If you contact Trek Bicycles, they may be able to give you info on the age of your bike based on the serial number, since they acquired the brand. If you want an estimate of the age from the cycling community, it would help to post pictures of the bicycle -- the entire bicycle and a close-up of the drivetrain (chain, sprockets, derailleurs), both from the ...


3

Being Hydraulic it is almost certain the caliper is double sided piston, where the pad on both sides moves. (Single sided calipers have a piston on one side, and push the disk onto pad on the other side). Presuming it is a double sided caliper, it is possible one piston is not moving, leaving the other piston to do all the movement and push one pad across ...


3

Take off the axle nut, slide on the freewheel tool, and replace the nut so that it holds the freewheel tool in place. Lock the freewheel tool in a bench vise. Grasp the wheel at the rim and turn counter-clockwise to unscrew. This gives you more leverage and control than a wrench.


3

Both cassettes are functionally equal. The HG-50 is 100% steel while the HG-81 has an alloy spider for its larger sprockets and extra milling to reduce weight and improve shifting performance. Generally Shimano cassettes for a given speed range and discipline are interchangeable. What you need to watch out for is the change over to Micro spline in the 12x ...


2

The trick is to grasp and turn the wheel itself, rather than turning the freewheel tool. This gives greater mechanical advantage, since the wheel’s radius is (probably) longer than your wrench. Of course, something needs to hold the freewheel tool fixed in place while you grab and turn the wheel. One option is to tighten the freewheel tool into a bench vise. ...


2

Funnily enough, bikeindex.org comes up with a very similar S/N, belonging to a Trek bicycle from 2019. https://bikeindex.org/bikes/409317 Trek and Gary Fisher brands are part of the same bike conglomerate, so it is likely that both frames are coming from the same factory. I guess then that your bicycle is from 2019 or 2018. Regarding valves: it depends on ...


2

SC-E5003 is not listed in the dealer manual for DU-EP800, so I don't actually know whether everything going on here is going to work and therefore this is a "suggestion" type answer. That said, it would seem like if there was a way to connect all those components together, the way to do it would be use one of the under-the-stem type Junction A ...


2

Assuming you mean from side to side, many disc brake calipers push a piston in from the side and sandwich the disc between that piston and a fixed pad on the other side of the caliper. Part of the setup/adjustment process for such brakes is to set the fixed pad position as close as possible to the rotor without having it rub, so as to minimize the sideways ...


2

If the kid is a hub motor that you have to build into a wheel, then its not 26" specific. You probably need different spokes though, the electric motor hubs tend to be a lot wider than whatever was in there. If its a whole replacement rear wheel, then I guess you could salvage the motor, and build it into a wheel. Again, different length spokes needed,...


2

Assuming the disc rotors are the same size, the brakes would work. However, you'd now have mismatched front and rear wheels, and the geometry of the bike would be changed. The head and seat angles would be slightly more laid back, and the bottom bracket would be a little lower (which could lead to pedal strike when cornering). You would, at minimum, probably ...


1

Sounds like your low-limit screw on the derailleur is allowing the cage and jockey wheels to move too far toward the centerline of the bike, and colliding with the spokes. This is bad, because if they hook then your forward momentum can pull the derailleur around in a circle with the wheel, causing significant expensive damage to any of the the derailleur, ...


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