7

Only you can decide if you "need or "want" a road bike. I would not upgrade your mountain bike in an attempt to make it a better road bike. As the saying goes a pig wearing lipstick is still a pig. If you want to road ride for a change of scenery or pace buy a used quality built bike. The used market should have lots of bikes suitable to the ...


5

There's no point replacing the fork. A better fork will be more robust but replacing a major component is not cost effective. A better fork will cost a significant fraction of the whole bike as a separate component. If you want a better fork you should have spent the money buying a higher spec bike in the first place. Wider tires are relatively inexpensive ...


5

I test-rode a trike that had a parking brake lever. There was an extra button underneath the housing and when you pull the lever, it clicked in and holds brake lever locked down. To release parking brake, you squeeze the lever a bit more and the button pops out. The brake is to help you load your cargo with the trike not rolling away. https://www....


4

For road racing and racing, get a road bike. A true road bike will not only be faster, but have better handling and be generally more fun to ride. Pay attention to fit and don't buy a bike without trying it unless you really know what you are doing. Modifying a mountain bike for road use will get you a bike that is not very good for either road or off road ...


3

Mechanical disc calipers typically have an external lever which is pulled by the cable to move the pads onto the rotor. You can try using something like a zip tie to pull and fix the lever. You can also just wind in the barrel adjuster on the cable but you’d need to re-adjust the caliper when you release it.


3

First, don't ride the bike if one of the brakes is not working properly. Not working well can change to not working at all and put you in a dangerous situation. Take the bike back to the store where you bought it, a 2 month old bike with a major brake problem should be fixed under warranty. In any case if you do not have experience diagnosing and repairing ...


3

Definitely one of the models in the Shimano Tourney range. You don't need to know exact model to replace it. You just need to know what specs the replacement derailleur needs. You can look at the derailleur models in the Tourney lines in the Shimano Line-Up pages (you might find you exact model by comparing pictures also). All the specs are pretty self-...


3

bikepedia.com has a lot of data, sometimes a bit incomplete. https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/ is my other quick-n-dirty go-to site. Take the values with a grain of salt, since the virus-caused biking craze has driven up prices on everything bike-related. Looks like those bikes might be 2008 or 2009 Giant XTC2s, although truvativ is listed as the stock ...


3

On these Shadow derailleurs, there is a tab that must rest on the bottom lip of the derailleur hangar. (I'll note at this point that you must use the correct hangar for your bike. "Almost" like it or "derailleur has the same angle" when an incorrect hangar is used doesn't cut it. Millimeter differences create big changes in the workings of these things. ...


2

Race Super Light and Marathon Super Light


2

There are far too many options and it's far too subjective for someone to give you a straight "get this bike" answer. You're kind of talking about the "All Mountain" to "Enduro" range of bikes. Ie bikes that can go long distance but can also go downhill. The all mountain type bikes typically start at 140mm-ish travel. The cube you link is one of these. ...


2

Shimano stamps the rear derailleur model number on the underside/lower plate of the parallelogram. All models for the last several decades.


2

If the RD is suited for 36 teeth it may work with a 38 but highly unlikely with a 42. Shimano is conservative with teeth counts, you're right but still there are limits to get things to work. It is mainly a problem with geometry. The cage will have trouble to take up the extra length of chain. And also not to get into the way of the sprockets. You could try ...


2

Determining the weakest point is impossible to say. What is going to fail first will depend on the terrain, speed and the aggressiveness of your riding style. If you are new to mountain biking your perception of what is rough ground will be far different than that of a more experienced rider. So just ride it until something fails. You have what is best ...


2

my local bike shop said he didn't have the required piece What? They can't order one? I'd be immediately suspicious and look for another local bike repair shop. To make sure you order the correct bottom bracket for your crank it's best to look at the Shimano axle length code. The Analog has a Acera FC-M3000 crank. The Shimano square taper bottom bracket ...


1

Clicking on hydraulic brakes with inner routing can be just cable hitting a frame when moving under increased tension. What is exact problem with braking? - do you need to apply extra force to brake or you feel like rotor is still spinning even under max pressure?


1

You obviously need a tire of the correct diameter for a "26 inch" wheel - These may be marked 26" or ISO / ETRTO 559. Generally you'll want a tire narrower than a MTB tire for on-road use. Narrower tires running a higher pressure have less rolling resistance. How much narrower is up to you depending on the roads or trails you want to ride on, ...


1

Every bike is an engineering compromise, so you got to know what you want in order to get it. For example a road bike is optimized for speed, which means good aerodynamics, low rolling resistance and low weight at the expense of everything else, notably comfort, ability to ride on any road that isn't smooth enough, luggage carrying capacity, etc. A mountain ...


1

RockHopper had aluminum frame, 26" wheels, Shimano Deore / Deore-LX derailleur, RockShox Judy front suspension, V-brakes, thin metallic pedals. I would consider this as mid-range from that era. Judy forks have remained consistant in their pecking order (give or take) for all this time. Similarly for Deore / LX. Could argue that LX is closer to modern ...


1

I'm trying to start mountain biking, I already have a bike, but I'm ready to upgrade. I'm looking for a bike that can take on weather, dirt, mud and about everything I throw at it. Why won't you ride with your current bike for few thousand km at least, and come here back with detailed explanations with what you don't like with your current bike? Because we ...


1

The crank chainring bolt center diameter (diameter of a circle that passes through the center of the chainring bolts) is what limits the maximum and minimum chainring sizes. It's likely that you will not be able to get a much smaller chainring on the FSA crank. To get to 24 tooth small rings you need an mountain bike crank. 'Two-piece' MTB cranks made for ...


1

That noise is a concern. It certainly sounds like something is hitting the rotor, but if the rotor is out of true you should get a periodic 'ching-ching-ching' sound. The noise is more random which makes me think something is loose, possibly the pad retraction spring has broken or come loose which is allowing a pad to rattle onto the rotor. Personally I'd ...


1

The rotor might not be perfectly true. Although the shop should fix it as it's a new bike, do be aware that big MTB rotors get out of true really easily and at some point you just need to live with it. This can be somewhat mitigated with two-piece rotors utilizing a beefier spider, but in the end you're riding trails; stuff breaks all the time. Is your ...


1

I recently tried to mount an slx m7100 with my old shimano Devore shifter and they don’t fit together in the right place I,e shifter levers are nowhere near brake lever so not compatible I’m afraid!


1

I had a loose spoke on the rear wheel that cause or seemed to cause the drive train to creak on every pedal going up hill or under load. Easy fix.


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