4

As you have a 1x drivetrain with non-integrated brakes and shifters upgrading it to one with more gears is relatively simple. You need to replace the shifter, rear derailleur and cassette and chain at a minimum. You can also replace the crankset and bottom bracket. As you have an 8 speed cassette the freehub body will take up to an 10 speed cassette with no ...


3

A fully for 700€ will be horrible. Bad suspension, heavy, few gears, bad wheels, bad tires … At least get a hardtail where 700€ will buy you a halfway decent front suspension (where the lock-out actually works) and okay-ish weight. With wide, tubeless tires and good riding skills you’ll barely notice the absence of a (bad) rear suspension.


2

The final result was "don't do that" (where "that" was to try to identify and match the existing sealant). Per advice in the comments I cleaned out the remaining liquid sealant (and the crud where the sealant had pooled and hardened during non-use), cleaned the inside with isopropyl alcohol and a lint-free towel, and then set the tires up with the sealant I ...


2

Just buy a suitable rigid fork from the decade, should be around $20. The dimensions for the fork can be found in this document, reproduced here: Yes, this fork is a Marzocchi XC500 - a well known air/oil suppension fork from around 1994. It has usualy a 1 1/8" steerer, also 1 1/4" have seen, steerer dimension are here. It is almost easy to service it, you ...


2

The side that you say has been rubbed silver by friction is like that on a new ring (I've got two, bought from SJS cycles). From what I can tell from other posts it's intended to stop water and crud getting into the bearing. That would suggest that the non-silver side, the ridged side, should go next to the bearing because this is like an oil seal (although ...


2

Sorry - we don't do valuations here. Its worth whatever someone is prepared to pay for it. Google suggests the model existed from 2005 through to present day. The serial number is generally useless for figuring out anything, other than warranty tracking. You might get some info from Giant directly, using their contact information at https://www....


2

You can swap out a suspension fork for a different one with more of less travel as long as the new fork has approximately the same axle to crown distance - the distance between the center of the axle and where the fork mates with the bottom of the head tube. IF this distance is too long the frame is tipped back and the steer angle slackened, if the fork is ...


2

Here is the official standard. It says M6×1 for the mounting holes.


1

If the steerer is threadless then you’re looking for a 1.125 inch or 1-1/8 inch , or 28.6mm straight steerer (all the same thing). You also need to match the wheel axle type e.g 9mm Quick Release (most likely) or 15mm x 100 thru axle (less likely). Lastly you want to match the travel within +/- 20mm. So if your current one is 100mm travel you don’t want to ...


1

if your tires say '26 × 1.79' the you have '26 inch' wheels also know as ISO/ETRTO 599, i.e. the rim diameter is 599mm. the '1.79' is the nominal width of the tire in inches. Mountain bikes all used to have this size wheel until '29 inch' appeared (ISO/ETRTO 622) and then the compromise '27.5 inch' (ISO/ETRTO 584) - hence the options you see on the website....


1

Lockouts are not all the same. A cheap lockout will mechanically inhibit the shock from moving until you manually unlock it. A better design of lockout will do the same, but a medium hit while locked out will release the lock, minimising the potential impact and damage to your suspension. Imagine grinding your bike up a hill... you would want suspension ...


1

The lockout in the video looks like its broken to me. Could you feel any difference in resistance in the fork when pressing down (difference between when the fork was 'locked out' or not)? The lockout's function is to save energy by keeping your fork rigid whilst climbing/pedalling 'out of the saddle'. Therefore there should be a significant change in ...


1

The Schwalbe web site explains that off-road tires can benefit from directional tread designs as driving and braking forces operate in different directions, but the article goes on to say that "in the case of a road tire the rolling direction is mainly important for aesthetic considerations. Tires marked with arrows simply look more dynamic.." However, ...


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