30

For riding on the flat on a sealed road, bike weight isn't that important. It just takes you longer to get to your steady-state speed. Tyre air pressure - for a MTB on the road I'd aim for 40-50 PSI (270-340 kPa, 2.7-3.5 bar, 2100-2600 Torr, 80-100 inHg) I was over 100 kg when riding something like this and 60 PSI (410 kPa) was needed in the back. Bike ...


28

Since no-one else posted this as an answer (Vladimir touched on it in comments) i'm going to add it. Please don't take this the wrong way, its not designed to be insulting. Simply put, you are slow because you are not bike fit (general fitness is not the same as bike fitness). You are right about all of the things that make your bike inefficient and slowing ...


18

Cannondale still makes them. Under the form you present, they are only found in urban E-bikes. On MTBs, they evolved into a different form. One drawback of this design is that the travel needs to be shorter than the head tube length. But MTBs evolved towards longer travel and needed to shorten the head tube to have good geometries. So Cannondale moved the ...


17

You are a cyclist if you’re riding a bike and enjoying yourself. Who is averaging 30km/hr ? You can’t hope to compete with road bikes on that bike. 15km/hour is not a bad average for a 26” bike with knobby tires so don’t beat yourself up. Factors that will contribute to your speed are: The weight. 17kg is relatively heavy compared to a modern trail bike and ...


17

Why are roadies so hunched over?!? Let me begin by characterizing why road bikes have their riding position vs why MTBs have theirs. It's a gross generalization of course, but most riders and riding positions fall decently into the two categories. Road bikes: To minimize frontal area for aerodynamic benefits and place the hips in the best position to ...


10

It is a little difficult to give an answer that distinguishes between the pros and cons of the concept and any untapped potential it might have versus Cannondale's implementation of it. With its very precise array of needle bearings on a non-round telescoping section, the Cannondale design is successful at being smooth and slop-free, but it's way too ...


8

The easiest upgrades would be: Tyres without knobs, and good tyres at that. I think Conti Grand Prix are the only kind-of road bike tyres you can get for 26" (559mm) but even a Schwalbe Marathon would have much less rolling resistance. You should also run them at a suitable pressure. Get some less baggy clothing Is the saddle really high enough? Hard ...


5

What you’re saying about your typical speeds sounds exactly like what I typically get on the hybrid 3-speed I use as a commuter. 15-20km/h is actually reasonably good for someone who is not cycling like a competitive cyclist and not using a high-end road-bike. Things I would change though: Don’t use Strava as a point of comparison. Data there is inherently ...


5

A short answer to explain a small part of your question. You touched on dropping heels as a way to move weight backwards - whilst it does indeed tend to shift your weight a little, it is not the primary goal. What it's actually about is the way your bodyweight interacts with the bike when it encounters a braking force (either by applying the brakes, or by ...


5

Lots of answers, but I also see a lot of common bicycle myths in the answers, so let me add some gas to the fire. 17 kg, I've changed its accessories but it's mostly the same thing still Cyclists vastly overestimate the effect of weight on speed. However, that's a fairly heavy bike! Assuming where you live is moderately hilly but nothing too extreme (say, ...


4

As a fellow "weekend warrior" type rider who also had a hybrid bike (with thicker tires) who also struggled with Strava numbers way higher than mine (note: still working on that - at least I'm no longer on the bottom of the leaderboards), I can sympathize with your situation. Here's what I did for myself to make myself more "bike fit" and ...


4

Very good answers already say what I would, but a I'll add correct maintenance matters. From the picture the bike seems to have been taken care of. But, just in case: make sure the drivetrain, bottom bracket, hubs and pedal axles are cleaned and lubricated correctly. In the drivetrain, excess oil, specially if it's thick, will retain dirt and gum up to a ...


3

A point worth mentioning that seems to be missing from the other answers: Hills kill your average. Say you are riding up hill, 12km at 5% average slope (600m height difference). You take two hours to get up there, that's 6km/h. At the top, you turn around and ride back home in 12 minutes (60km/h). Now, what is your average? (6km/h + 60km/h)/2 = 33km/h? No! ...


2

How do hydraulic disc brakes make sense on these styles of bikes, given the tendency of pistons to "stick" when dust makes its way inside MTB brakes don't actually have much of this tendency. I've had my brakes covered pretty gruesomely in mud, and spraying with water was always enough to get them working again. Not great – they'll certainly go a ...


2

There's a distinction the video doesn't really make clear between things one does to prevent piston stickiness issues as a matter of having good technique, and things one does to solve the problem when it happens. Cleaning the pistons with alcohol and a rag or q-tip before resetting them goes a long way to keeping things on track. So does centering the ...


2

The question, as it is formulated, assumes that there is a fully rational explanation for the observed situation. In reality, acceptance and widespread of any technology depends on many factors, not all of them being rational, and even not all depending on the merits of the said technology in isolation: Engineering compromises. Economical considerations. ...


2

Yes, it's the left side dust cover, you have installed it correctly in your photograph, into the left side of the hub. It should remain as pictured so it can tessellate with the dark grey ring on the cone, creating a 'labyrinth' seal to keep dust out. If it was reversed, then it would obstruct the assembly. I don't see it on the exploded parts diagram, I ...


2

For completeness, the part shown in the OP's photos, the silver recessed ring (dust cover) would appear to be the left hand counter-part of part #5, which doesn't appear to be shown in the exploded diagram: As Swifty states in their answer, it may be that it is part of part #11 and sits within the recess of part #11. However, it is strange that it isn't ...


1

It looks like it's mostly a 'generation' issue: the M6000 was the top of the previous Deore range. Given than the top of the current Deore range is now 1x12 with 10/51T cassettes (M6100), 11/42T cassettes have moved to the 'basic' Deore setups (M4120 without clutch, M5120 with clutch). Otherwise, to summarize the spec sheets, the M6000 has a clutch and the ...


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