13

I sell that bike at work. The road/mountain FD mismatch functions very badly. We've had to replace the front derailleurs with road models. The total throw of a road shifter isn't enough for it to shift well and not have rub anywhere. It's terrible. It can be made to kinda sorta work if you accept rub in the lowest gear. But, that shouldn't be acceptable. And ...


12

It seems like there is a problem with the rim tape. The tape should seal the spoke holes without milk. Try cleaning the rim and replacing the tape if it is still loosing pressure.


10

You have two shifters. A friction shifter for the front derailer and a 6-speed indexed shifter for the rear derailer. The shifters are operating by turning the grip front and back (like a motorbike throttle). The front shifter is on the left. You must learn how to find the right position yourself, because it is a friction shifter, you can move it ...


10

I am far from convinced the bike is stock, I would be surprised if any bike manufacturer or seller would ship a bike in this condition, even a cheap BSO. The rear tire is definitely not new, so its probably not a new bike. What little I can see of the shock it looks out of place (Aircan shock on a cheap looking frame). I therefore suspect the shock has ...


7

It almost certainly won't happen with a cassette hub. It can happen on standard axle cassette hubs, but it takes a lot, and there's basically always a dropout alignment problem at work in addition to heavy loads over time when it does. Eight and nine speed standard axle (M10 or 3/8") freewheel hubs are the definition of a cynical design. They work ...


7

It's a clamp-on FD, so the seat tube is standard diameter. It doesn't appear there would be anything holding you back from using a clamp-on housing stop, probably positioned a little lower and offsetting it as needed to clear the tire. You'll need new cable and housing. Get it working and cut the old stop off. It's a curious situation, so before cutting, it ...


5

It's at your own risk, doesn't always work, and may be a waste of time, but burning it out is the way to go if you have to do it. Looking past the global northy sort of time/money/risk/hassle equation, it's a pretty reasonable fix. I have no idea what the potential ill effects on braking power or trustworthiness of the pad material might be, but this ...


4

Given you just bought the bike, my first response would be to contact the seller and ask for advise and suggestions There are two possible modifications I can see. You will void any frame warranty by doing either of these. Mod the cable stop - shorten the total length of the boss and drill a two-step hole in the stub. I would not add a slot as per the ...


4

Adding to Vladimir's answer: The different size chainrings in the crank provide larger jumps in gear ratios, the smaller sprockets on the wheel provide smaller jumps. There is quiet a large overlap between the gear ratios available when on each of the three chainrings. The general idea is that you select the appropriate front chainring for whatever gradients ...


4

Another option - change out your cassette to one with an 11-tooth smallest cog. Per Sheldon Brown's gear calculator, pedaling at 100 rpm on a 42-tooth chainring and a 12-tooth cassette cog results in a speed of 28 mph. Going to a cassette with an 11-tooth small cog, at 100 rpm that's 31 mph. Getting up to 120 rpm results in a 37 mph speed. And 37 mph on ...


4

A common observation is that Shimano sets conservative limits to capacities of its derailleur products. Many people, including myself, run bigger than allowed cassettes with no problems. Additionally, there are aftermarket adapters available that are designed to help exceed the nominal capacity of certain road and MTB derailleurs. Is that a common thing ...


3

As the question is formulated now, there is no definitive answer. It is really up for you to decide. Here are some hints though. You can either buy online, or in person. In both cases you can buy either new or used. When buying online, you cannot "feel" an object before getting it, compared to buying in person. However, in both cases it is possible ...


3

More information on the type of bike you have and maybe a video of the grinding would aid in diagnosis. As Argenti says - the easiest thing to do is to take the bike back to the shop if that's possible. I'll take a shotgun approach. I'm going to assume you had a bike delivered to you in a box and did the final assembly. If you have a front and / or rear ...


3

Your question is unclear; a frame would normally be just a frame, without calipers or levers. From your question it is therefore not clear whether you have the levers or not. M3050 is a basic caliper with no special features. If you buy the cheapest set of Shimano brakes, which would be MT200, then this would be the same quality as M3050, but would come with ...


3

The BH59 or BH90 will work. You will need to trim the hoses to length (as they always come excessively long), and install them with the correct hydraulic fittings. There will be a T-shaped insert that needs to be hammered into each end of the cut hose, a brass barrel-shaped piece that slips over each end, and a special nut that holds everything together and ...


3

Something happening inside the freehub is different. Possible variants that I can think of: One hub has more or different thicker grease on its pawls (or equivalent parts responsible for enforcing the one-way rotation). The grease adds "liquid" friction between the parts, preventing them from smashing as fast against each other with every step of ...


3

This is a stupid manufacturer's mistake, but if it really happens only on the hardest impacts then it's probably not that bad of an issue. I'd be most worried about the hanger puncturing the tyre, so what I would do is just to file the upper edge of the hanger (where the paint is anyway chipped already) completely round and then covering the spot with some ...


2

What bike is that? I’m curious as to which brand is specifying air suspension with a Tourney drivetrain. You could switch the front derailleur to a side swing design like this one, eliminating the need for that cable stop: https://bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/alivio-m3100/FD-M3120-M-B.html Finally, your rear tire looks kind of worn out. Maybe ...


2

IMO, this is fine. I base that answer on the fact that I've been running Avid BB7s on Shimano Centerlock rotors and they are also too low, and in fact abrade down into the arms a bit. After thousands of (touring) miles, this has caused no braking issues nor even any perceptible pinging, etc. There is more on this here. If you put in a couple spacers, you'll ...


2

With the clutch engagement switch in the "off" position, the derailleur cage should move smoothly with the only resistance being from the cage spring. All indications are that your derailleur has failed (there's a good chance this is what caused your chain to break) and needs to be repaired or replaced. Pre-COVID, replacements for 10-speed XT RDs ...


2

Shimano BR-M3050 calipers are from the Acera line: https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/acera-m3000/BR-M3050.html Normally I'd point you to the Shimano specifications page which tells you the brake hose kit required, however the BR-M3050 calipers are missing. I suspect that the BR-M3050 calipers are new and replace the BR-MT200 calipers in the ...


2

This relates to the lack of 'full groupsets' fitted to nearly every MTB sold today. The spec of your bike is largely 'Deore XT M780', but you have an 'XTR M980' rear derailleur. This is something seen on many many new bikes - a higher spec RD and lower spec elsewhere The first and most important thing to note here is that XTR M980, XT M773, SLX M6663, and ...


2

This exact thing happened to me when my wife and I bought new bikes. One bike clicked more loudly when rolling. The bike store employee said it was most likely due to the internal grease amount or location, and would not affect wear or performance.


2

Your front derailleur is spaced for +10 and +8 gaps between small and middle and then middle and big ring. If you examine your front derailleur you will see that it has a groove spaced to shift for those gap sizes. Going to +14 then +10 will give poor shifting performance, so it would be best to find a matching front derailleur, or to maintain those gap ...


1

There are a few issues that you will run into. The larger difference between the smallest and largest chainrings means the derailleur has to be able to take up more slack in the chain when shifting from largest to smallest rings. This may exceed the Total Capacity specification of the derailleur. The capacity needed is (difference between smallest/largest ...


1

Contrary to other answers, there is a way to have everything you asked for: instead of buying new, find an old square taper XT crankset. At the time of writing this, it took 15 seconds to find one on eBay. The old crankset will fit square taper bottom bracket (but you'll have to check that the length matches or is close enough). It will be compatible with ...


1

It's quite unlikely you can't get enough top speed on that bike with those gears. A 42/12 ratio with 29x2.2" tyres results in a 28mph top speed at 90rpm (most people could pedal faster). Since it is a mountain bike, you probably won't be going that fast except maybe down a steep hill, in which case not pedalling usually works out faster. On a ...


1

I assume you're testing a tyre's width, not its total radius because that would change the rim size. I'm also taking this as "how to design a tyre test " because otherwise you're asking for opinions, which would not be very Scientific, and would also be off-topic. There's a lot of things to vary. Good scientific tests try to fix all the variables ...


1

I think it's likelier than not that the one you link to won't work with boost. Boost/148 isn't listed in what it's compatible with. If it was made with 142 in mind it's not likely to work by coincidence, because of trainer thru-axles that are adaptable to different spacings, they do it by swapping spacers around on an axle that's long enough to accommodate ...


1

Many thanks for all the tips. I ended up buying a new FC-M540 chainring with holes (since my current one was already quite old) and a chainguard that is actually meant for FC-T671/FC-T781 (Y-1MP98070). Needless to say that the chainguard fits perfectly to the FC-M540 chainring, although officially they are listed as incompatible. Everything works perfectly, ...


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