68

The following list contains the basic characteristics and differences for the aforementioned types of MTBs plus 2 types of bikes that you didn't mention. Note that I've tried to summarise and "average" the characteristics of modern MTBs used today by amateurs and pros. So 9 kgs for XC bikes means that you can easily find 8 and 11 kg ones. Cross country (XC) ...


67

For the past few years, I have commuted on a road bike for most of the year and on a mountain bike for late fall through early spring. My commute also involves both classic road-riding and more urban-style riding. What I've Found I've found that I prefer the road bike by a significant degree. Living in a hilly area, it is always a pleasure to drop the ...


57

I've had to commute routes where I need to use a narrow staircase to go up and down a pedestrian bridge over a highway. For starters, any place where you have to share narrow space with pedestrian, the polite way to do so is to dismount. I shoulder the bike or walk it. The bike always goes to the far side ( If there is a fence or wall, the bike goes towards ...


52

If you can imagine a compromise between a mountain bike that is light weight and easy to pedal, versus one with that is strong and has lots of suspension travel to tackle rougher terrain you might get a diagram such as the one below. As we go from category to category we get heavier bikes that are harder to pedal, but that can handle rougher and rougher ...


50

If the part of mountain bikes that you think looks cool is the rear suspension, I very much recommend you buy an uncool bike. Rear suspension is very heavy, requires maintenance, means you can't fit good mudguards, stops you using panniers and means that, while you're riding, part of your energy is going into flexing the bike around instead of moving you ...


50

Frankly if you're going up/down steps, you're in the pedestrian's space and not somewhere suitable for cycling. You know how sometimes vehicle traffic intrudes on our cycle lanes? Parking inconsiderately, putting cyclists at risk? That's what you'd be doing to the pedestrians by riding in their space. Don't be that-guy. Your solutions are to either walk ...


40

The single-legged fork must truly withstand heavier bending forces than conventional forks, simply due to physics and asymmetricity. But because of its different construction, the fork is actually stiffer than most 2-legged. Pros The top is attached like a dual crown downhill fork, which is much stiffer than a single-crown. The wheel axle is one-piece with ...


40

Leave your current bike alone, save your money for the replacement bike. To make a significant difference to the current bike you'll probably have to spend a significant fraction of the original purchase price and face major headaches figuring out compatibility of components. Leave it original and sell it when you get the new bike. If you do want to spend ...


35

It can be considered "impolite" by roadies, but not because of the bike you were riding or the fact you didn't take a pull (although I am sure some will argue for this). The main reason random drop-in riders are generally frowned upon are because of: the dangers associated with unpredictability of a new rider lack of insurance coverage Potential ...


33

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


33

A 1x drivetrain (single chainring) is pretty much the standard now in mountain biking - you will notice the rear cassette is much wider than the classic 3x7 setup you are used to. The wide rear cassette gives a wide range of gears (although not always as wide as the old 3x7). Most also have also moved to more speeds(sprockets) in the rear (i.e., 11-12 speed)...


31

Spinning wheels have gyroscopic effects. Whipping the bike can be a way to reposition the bike so that when it comes out of the whip, it is in an orientation that wouldn't be possible going over the jump dead-straight. This effect is large in the case of motocross. From a BMX perspective, it is very important to land on the backside of the landing ramp with ...


28

First off, when riding over rough terrain you should be hovering above your saddle, not sitting on the saddle. This holds whether riding a hard tail (no rear suspension) or riding a full suspension bike. If you are sitting you have less ability to move your weight around, and therefore less control of the bike. When sitting it is easy for a large bump to ...


28

Unfortunately, most bikes are only rated to 300lbs or less. However, if this is a new bike, you should take it back to the shop and get them to fix it. They can't claim they didn't know you were a heavy rider when they sold you the bike. You might need to get more substantial wheels with more spokes. Wheels designed for touring bikes might be more ...


28

10-15 km is not a particularly long distance. You can certainly ride and MTB on roads to commute to work. Obviously an MTB will not be as efficient to ride as a bike designed for road use (such as a flat-bar commuter, road oriented hybrid or drop bar road bike). You can make your MTB more efficient by fitting narrower tires with a road tread (or no tread) ...


27

All the elite riders I have encountered just know. I think its part of the attention to detail necessary at that level. You almost never see them looking down to check (that would be showing a weakness and giving oponents an opportunity). But if you mean can the rider say which cog they are using at the front and rear? then the answer is that often we can'...


27

With so many good answers I hesitate to say anything. But, in an effort to add something useful to the conversation... The Value Curve Part of the reason it's hard to understand the difference between more and less expensive bikes is that you do get what you pay for, but cost increases faster than value. What is Value? For the purposes of this answer I'm ...


26

I've got about 20,000 miles experience commuting in Alaska snow. There are really 3 kinds of snow to deal with: deep & fluffy, hard & icy, and slush. I have two bikes, a Pugsley with Large Marge tires for deep snow, and a Kona 29er for everything else. The trick to the Pugs is deflating the tires so they track right. 10psi in front is maybe too ...


26

because I have no problem stopping Objectively, this is nonsense. At best, you can stop before you start going down the steps. Once you start going down steps on a bike though, you are completely unable to stop before you reach the bottom, and you have very limited control over your speed whilst you're doing it. And that's assuming you stay on your ...


25

Generally mountain bikes offer certain advantages and disadvantages over, say, road bikes for commuting. Advantages: The seating position is comfortable, and ridig will also be very comfortable due to suspension and the wider tires. Also, in bad weather, mud and snow you probably have better traction with MB tires. Also the wide handlebars make nimble ...


24

Breaking the rules with a kind-of non-answer and personal opinion, but... 1) Mountain bikes should be heavier than a cyclocross bike. It's got a suspension fork and frame and wheels need to be beefier to handle bigger loads and impacts. 2) Don't buy a bike with a plan replace major components. Just buy the bike that meets your needs in the first place (in ...


23

It's common etiquette, at least everywhere I've been, to stay away from wet and muddy trails (unless they're supposed to be or always are a mudfest). Riding on a muddy trail makes ruts which make the trail conditions worse for everyone once the mud dries and the ground hardens. In addition to ruts, if the trail is muddy and you slide out a front wheel going ...


23

For context, I ride in the North Shore of Vancouver, BC, Canada, which is an area famous for its steep and technically challenging trails. I'm comfortable riding black diamond-rated trails. Here's an example of one (not my video): Personally, I ride SPD. I've tried Crankbrothers for six months, but I didn't like the feel, and ...


22

First of all you need to tell the LBS (local bike shop) that the disk can be "fixed". Then you need to find another LBS because they are either amateurs or are simply trying to make you buy stuff that you don't need. You need to remove the oily disk from the bike and use a bike degreaser or alcohol on it to remove all oil. Rub with a clean dry cloth or ...


22

If the bike has been hanging rather than sitting with weight on the tyres (and hence damaging the sidewalls), there is a good chance the tyres are still ok. You can check the tyres by going around and looking for hairline cracks in the rubber and feeling if the rubber is brittle/flaky. If they look ok then go ahead and inflate them and recheck the ...


22

"a decent chunk of money on one bike" this is a very slippery slope. If this is your first bike, look for a used hardtail MTB for relatively low cost, and simply store any leftover money. You'll want to buy accessories over time like helmet, tools and lights and so on. Ideally the fork would have a working "lockout" lever, to disable ...


21

Cadence mostly. The answer to your question is in the title. Experience. Same way motocross riders know what gear they are in. The speed of the engine vs how fast they are moving.


21

A 3-year-old affects the bike's balance and handling, so you want something quite forgiving. Suspension will make you work really hard with the extra weight bouncing around over the back wheel (even just front suspension) and you should be wary about riding the sort of thing that really needs it on a back-heavy, top-heavy bike. Road frames are often carbon ...


20

All the above answers are valid and good. In addition to that, I would strongly advise focusing on what is sometimes called "rider fit". It is the position of your seat, seat post, handlebars etc. The big one will be the seat height relative to inside leg length. You may find that minor upgrades such as stem length dramatically improve bike feel. This will ...


20

Simply put, what you get by paying more is better features (more gear ratios, hydraulic brakes, better suspension), less weight, and better durability and reliability. It's pretty obvious that stronger and lighter materials cost more. Better suspension and gear trains require more sophisticated designs with more components with lower tolerances, which cost ...


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