9

The specs for the Schwinn Traverse, made by Pacific cycles circa 2010, are dearth. What I have seen on the Schwinn Traverse is that it is 21 speed (3x7 Shimano, w/SRAM grip shift) mountain style bike with alloy front suspension. If you are in possession of a stock Traverse, the rear is a Freewheel hub which has a Shimano 7 speed freewheel screwed onto the ...


7

I think you will need a claw hanger adapter. The old derailleur has one that appears to be non-removable, and the new one has a 10mm bolt that expects to find a matching hole in the frame, which yours won't have. You probably want something that looks like this: There is a sunrace branded one, but it looks the same in the critical dimensions as a generic ...


4

You can do a couple of things to accomplish using just the middle front chainring: 1) set the front derailleur "Hi" & "Lo" limit adjustment screws so that the side to side travel of the derailleur cage is stopped from moving the chain onto the smallest and largest chainrings (you should still have some lateral cage movement in order ...


4

Zion was the brand for in-house bicycles from Jenson's USA. The Zion bicycles were solid and nicely built bicycles, with a reputation of having a very good quality-price ratio. Fat bike have very wide tires (4" or more). Even too wide for daily rides. They are deemed to be good for snow/sands (outside roads). However, they can be quite slushy. Fat bikes ...


3

Unfortunately your in a territory that is very opinion based. The specs you list are not a bad starting point provided you understand the limits your budget brings. Overall the bike will be strong enough and components will be reasonable. A more expensive bike will be lighter with components that last longer and perform better. Heavy off road use of an ...


3

Judging by your last photo you have somehow unscrewed your cup&cone bearings at least partly, making your bearings extremely loose. Bearing play should be carefully adjusted. You usually need special, thin wrenches to adjust bearing play. You might have lost some bearing balls in the meantime. While you are at it you should re-grease them. Probably best ...


3

I experienced the same issue on a Marlin 7. Turns out that the bottom bracket was loose, so I tightened it up and the issue is gone.


2

I typically ride 50 miles per week with 8,000 to 10,000 ft of descent (and ascent). I get about 200 miles out of a pair of pads. (SRAM Centerline 200 mm rotors and resin pads.)


2

First, it's the condition of the bike and components that matter, not really the age. Although I haven't heard of Zion either, the components you describe are at at least a level up from those typical of really bottom-end mountain bikes. Crankset (info https://www.servicearchive.sram.com/sites/default/files/techdocs/2005_cr-4arm-e-r2.pdf ): FireX was at ...


2

Your derailleur looks deceptively similar to Shimano RD-TY20-GS and Shimano RD-TY15, but after taking a closer look at the embossed letters on the side, it turns out that it was manufactured by Lingxiang. It's probably model LXA-01 In case of Shimano derailleurs, the actual model name is stamped on the back [example]. Perhaps it's also true for this one.


1

If you are new to mountain biking I would suggest the medium. Most novice riders I have loaned a bike to feel more comfortable on a slightly smaller frame than a slightly too large frame. When riding in terrain they have never experienced the smaller frame tends to be more nimble and not being overly concerned about your crotch hitting the top bar instills a ...


1

Fatbike The "fatbike" is a marketting term - its just a rigid MTB that has been coupled with super wide tyres, often 100+mm wide. They do have places where they excel, but that is soft blown sand and fresh snow, and when the tyre's air pressure is very low. A fatbike rides at about normal walking pace when riding on these surfaces (which is much ...


1

Lower back pain is a problem for many of us. Strengthen your core with any exercise you like, plank, active plank, side plank etc. I also duck under an imaginary lazer, bending at the hip to strengthen the lower back, that seems to help me a lot.


1

I'm don't think much of staments that any one position is “exactly the correct position”. Any position is wrong if you need to strain and stiffen yourself to keep it. It's true that the “attack position” works well in a variety of riding situations, but there's no point keeping it all the time when there's not even something to attack in the trail! ...


1

Have you checked that your derailleur hanger is straight? You’d need a hanger alignment gauge like the Park DAG or Shimano TL-RD11, etc. there are lots of different options from different bike tool suppliers, but it’s always my first step with any rear derailleur adjustment, to check the hanger. I also find most of the bikes I see are at least a little bit ...


1

The only thing I can think of is that maybe the various adjustments are set so initially you are barely on the 8 side of gear 7/8 and after 6 steps you are barely on the 1 side of gear 1/2. It's worth examining your rear derailleur closely to make sure the hanger is straight and the derailleur itself isn't binding or damaged. I would go through the full ...


1

Sounds like you bought the wrong shifter. The "ST-EF500" is available in both 7 speed and 8 speed A 7 speed shifter has 7 resting positions, and will click 6 times across its range. ST-EF500-7R4A Likewise, an 8 speed shifter will click 7 times. ST-EF500-8R4A If your cassette has 8 cogs total, then you need an 8 speed shifter. If you're totally ...


1

One thing that can cause too much weight on the hands is having poor core strength. The end result of this is usually a rounded back and slumping forward placing extra weight on the arms to support what your core is unable to. You might like to do some core exercises or perhaps some yoga to try and maintain a better posture on the bike.


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