57

I've had to commute routes where I need to use a narrow staircase to go up and down a pedestrian bridge over a highway. For starters, any place where you have to share narrow space with pedestrian, the polite way to do so is to dismount. I shoulder the bike or walk it. The bike always goes to the far side ( If there is a fence or wall, the bike goes towards ...


50

Frankly if you're going up/down steps, you're in the pedestrian's space and not somewhere suitable for cycling. You know how sometimes vehicle traffic intrudes on our cycle lanes? Parking inconsiderately, putting cyclists at risk? That's what you'd be doing to the pedestrians by riding in their space. Don't be that-guy. Your solutions are to either walk ...


33

A 1x drivetrain (single chainring) is pretty much the standard now in mountain biking - you will notice the rear cassette is much wider than the classic 3x7 setup you are used to. The wide rear cassette gives a wide range of gears (although not always as wide as the old 3x7). Most also have also moved to more speeds(sprockets) in the rear (i.e., 11-12 speed)...


31

Spinning wheels have gyroscopic effects. Whipping the bike can be a way to reposition the bike so that when it comes out of the whip, it is in an orientation that wouldn't be possible going over the jump dead-straight. This effect is large in the case of motocross. From a BMX perspective, it is very important to land on the backside of the landing ramp with ...


26

because I have no problem stopping Objectively, this is nonsense. At best, you can stop before you start going down the steps. Once you start going down steps on a bike though, you are completely unable to stop before you reach the bottom, and you have very limited control over your speed whilst you're doing it. And that's assuming you stay on your ...


23

For context, I ride in the North Shore of Vancouver, BC, Canada, which is an area famous for its steep and technically challenging trails. I'm comfortable riding black diamond-rated trails. Here's an example of one (not my video): Personally, I ride SPD. I've tried Crankbrothers for six months, but I didn't like the feel, and ...


22

"a decent chunk of money on one bike" this is a very slippery slope. If this is your first bike, look for a used hardtail MTB for relatively low cost, and simply store any leftover money. You'll want to buy accessories over time like helmet, tools and lights and so on. Ideally the fork would have a working "lockout" lever, to disable ...


17

From the perspective of a competition where time matters, whipping does not serve any purpose, as it won't allow to clear a jump any faster. Scrubbing, on the other hand, allows the rider to take a lower arc and spend less time in air, at least theoretically. However, if we are talking about an event where style matters, whipping does look cool, and it ...


17

Here is another thing to do now: think about what sort of riding you want to do. The Scott Scale appears to be a performance-oriented hardtail MTB. I am not familiar with MTB disciplines, but it may be a cross country (XC) race bike. It is slow on pavement because it is designed for a completely different environment. If you are mainly on paved roads or ...


16

My understanding is that performance-oriented mountain biking has evolved to take on tougher and more technical terrain. If you design a bike specifically for a 1x drivetrain, then all else equal, it should free up some clearance to enable wider tires. This is because you don't have to account for how the front derailleur would otherwise hit the rear tire. ...


15

The brake pivot broke off the frame in a very unusual way. A framebuilder may be able to contrive a pretty cheap way of fixing it by putting a new pivot stud in. This would still require removing the paint in the area, but it wouldn't necessarily be that bad. Minimum prices for framebuilders to even get into repair j jobs are typically in the $100-200 range ...


15

You've got off to a great start, well done. Several answers tell you how to improve quickly, and they're not wrong. But you'll see plenty of improvement just by riding often, occasionally pushing yourself, and resting when you feel the need after a hard effort. Riding daily to work/school/college if reasonable, with something for fun some weekends is hugely ...


15

I went back to my LBS and the owner was very happy to help. Apparently the Scott Scale 40 comes with handlebars that are meant to be cut to size based on a person’s arm length. I got that done and they took off an inch on both sides. In addition, they swapped me out for 32 mm Kenda tires. I rode the bike afterwards and it was really nice. Perhaps the tires ...


14

You almost certainly have a 7 or 8 speed freewheel hub. They can do this, especially 8. Google those terms along with broken axles. 8 speed freewheel hubs had some years of prominence circa 2000-2001 and then were rejected by the industry because of these problems. They have now made a return due to manufacturers answering the pressure to fit so many other ...


14

2.00 or 2.20 or 2.30 inch tyre that I would use at 7-8 bars (100-120 PSI) Does such a tire exist? No. A little math... The surface area of a torus is 4 x pi^2 x R x r, where R is the large radius of the wheel and r is the radius of the tire here. Let's put a 2.00 tire on a 29er rim... 4 x pi^2 x 15" (approx radius of wheel at center of tire cross ...


14

The position of shock mounts is only one variable of many of the rear linkage design. It does not play an isolated role but really is tied to everything else. You might have missed that there are many other designs. The upper mount can be on the top tube as well: Or really, in many other places, like in-line with the seatstays: Or pretty much hidden just ...


13

I sell that bike at work. The road/mountain FD mismatch functions very badly. We've had to replace the front derailleurs with road models. The total throw of a road shifter isn't enough for it to shift well and not have rub anywhere. It's terrible. It can be made to kinda sorta work if you accept rub in the lowest gear. But, that shouldn't be acceptable. And ...


13

I think you should always check with a doctor if you have concerns about your health. While you probably can get advice on your health from this forum, this is not the best place to seek specific medical advice that is going to be right for you. With that said provided you have no issues that can stop you from training here is what worked for me and others ...


12

It seems like there is a problem with the rim tape. The tape should seal the spoke holes without milk. Try cleaning the rim and replacing the tape if it is still loosing pressure.


12

Manufacturers design the bike suspension with specific characteristics in mind. For example, should the bike be more poppy or plusher and ground hugging to ride. One parameter in this process is the leverage ratio curve of the rear wheel (Wheel Travel/ Shock travel over the whole travel range). There are many more parameters, but I won't go into details, ...


11

Judging from your videos, it appears that the chainrings and crank are no longer connected. It appears that you have something called a one-piece crankset. If you are confident that you can learn how to disassemble it, I’d say you’re up for the repair. Once you have the crank off the bike, you’ll be able to see how the chainrings and crank arm are connected. ...


11

I am far from convinced the bike is stock, I would be surprised if any bike manufacturer or seller would ship a bike in this condition, even a cheap BSO. The rear tire is definitely not new, so its probably not a new bike. What little I can see of the shock it looks out of place (Aircan shock on a cheap looking frame). I therefore suspect the shock has ...


11

A few considerations: You have two competing characteristics here: You want a bike that excels at the niche you enjoy the most. You also want the bike to be capable of handing the other niches to an extent you’re happy with. For example, if you enjoy road riding the most and therefore pick a road bike, you won’t be very capable off-road even though you ...


10

You have two shifters. A friction shifter for the front derailer and a 6-speed indexed shifter for the rear derailer. The shifters are operating by turning the grip front and back (like a motorbike throttle). The front shifter is on the left. You must learn how to find the right position yourself, because it is a friction shifter, you can move it ...


10

I have exactly the same type of mount and the same type of GPS with it, and after a few years of use the contact interface has become worn out, just as you describe. The problem was exacerbated by the fact that it was both the mount guides and the GPS unit's backplate grooves that got widened, so replacing just the mount part would not be very effective. ...


10

It never gets easier, you just go faster. — Greg Lemond It actually sounds like you are doing great, that 30km ride was 50% longer than your previous largest ride which is pretty significant. Just sticking with it is a big part of the equation here but, there are lots of training plans out there like https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/training/cycling-...


9

No. It makes no sense to run a large tire at high pressures. As indicated in the comments, modern cycling has now accepted that higher tire pressure does not equate to lower rolling resistance in the real world. Further, the ideal MTB tire (presuming there is such a thing, which there is not) requires tread to bite into soft surfaces. What tread pattern and ...


9

The specs for the Schwinn Traverse, made by Pacific cycles circa 2010, are dearth. What I have seen on the Schwinn Traverse is that it is 21 speed (3x7 Shimano, w/SRAM grip shift) mountain style bike with alloy front suspension. If you are in possession of a stock Traverse, the rear is a Freewheel hub which has a Shimano 7 speed freewheel screwed onto the ...


8

You could replace the crank with any Shimano 2x9 crank for a square taper cartridge bottom bracket (with the same chainring sizes are crank arm length or course). If the bike is equipped with an Altus groupset then an Altus 2x9 crank would be a reasonable choice. There is a bit of an annoying wrinkle to this, different square taper crank models require ...


8

Shifters don't care about wheel/rim size. They only care about how many gears there are to shift across, and once you hit 10~11 speed then it also matters whether the bike is using a road or MTB groupset. Answer Yes you can move shifters to another bike, as long as the speeds match, and the handlebar diameter is the same. Your bike is a 3x on the front and ...


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