New answers tagged

1

My guess is that it's RD-L541. And it's paired with a 6-speed cassette, which is consistent. EDIT: I should have clicked on the link posted above. Looks we arrived at the same conclusion. So, I'll just post a picture.


0

Referring you to my comment, some more information would let us be more helpful. But, some general information: Brake pads for rim brakes are typically a rubbery material mounted perpendicular to a post. That post is fixed to the brake mechanism by some sort of mount that allows up-down and side-side movement when loosened. The pad should rub on the rim, ...


2

I can't find the exact model, but it looks very similar to this one that I found on VeloBase. If you have the patience check out this list. Shimano starts around page 8. I suspect it might be a bottom of the range version of a Light Action, but I'm far from an expert EDIT: I think it might be this one. You're fortunate I stumbled across this question when I ...


2

It looks a lot like this 2000 Marin Mt Vision The front of the bike is very close. The rear of the bike seems a little off But then, given the clarity of the posted photo ....


4

At home? On the trail? How big a hole? If it’s around 5mm or less you can use a “bacon strip” tubeless plug. If it’s larger you are probably going to want to glue a patch to the inside of the tire. Proprietary plug systems are similar to bacon strips for utility just quicker & more expensive. A plug of any kind can be considered a forever fix. Sidewall ...


4

It is possible to do a 2x to 1x conversion but as stated in other answers you generally need to do something to keep the chain on the chainring. Generally a narrow-wide chainring is used on 1x setups to retain the chain. Leaving the derailleur in can also accomplish this. Re-using a double crank with a single biases the chainring to one side, ending up with ...


-3

I was thinking about going for a really large chainring at the front and removing the front mech Don't. I have a bicycle without front derailleur. If there is no front derailleur, when riding over a bump at high speed, the chain is at danger of falling from the chainring. This has happened to me. Not only that, but the only way to get the chain back to the ...


6

In theory, a smaller wheel is stronger than a bigger wheel if hub and rim section are the same. This is largely due to the length of the spoke and it's contributions to the stiffness/flex vs spoke braking force. Whether the difference between a 27.5 wheel and a 29 wheel is in of itself enough to mean a real world differe, I don't think so. I think a strongly ...


1

Indeed foam sleeping mats are light but very bulky. Get an ultralight iflatable one. I've slept on a 250g one in the snow.


-2

When commuting. Or even MTB'ing. Don't unclip in advance. Unclip 0.3 seconds before stepping down. SPD is a wonder! How to uncli: step down. Not down, not to the side. Just step 30cm to the left/right of your bike. Down and to the side.


4

The numbers don't tally because you're measuring wrongly, I've marked up your photo with the circle (in yellow) you should be measuring, it's more like 147mm, or whatever irl without camera perspective distortion. That's much closer to the calculated value - 88 mm adjacent = 149mm calculated BCD. Measuring guide: Terminology index - a list of bike part names ...


5

It looks like you have a crankset with non-removable chainrings. The 'bolts' you are measuring the geometry of are just screws holding the chainguard on. The chainrings appear to be pressed steel and attached at the crank axle. It's much more likely the pressed steel rings are bent than the bottom bracket axle, so replacing the entire crank is possibly all ...


3

Before buying a replacement ring I would recommend removing the crank assembly. This requires a "square taper crank tool"along with a socket and ratchet most likely 14mm. Once off the bike edit your question to include photos of both sides of the assemble. Try to determine if the crank is bent by laying the crank on a flat surface (pedal side up) ...


2

are there any real downsides to this? The one thing about a typical MTB that really doesn't work well on the road are soft-compound, deep-thread tyres: they have lots of rolling resistance and wear out quickly. But this is easily fixed because even the burliest enduro bike can be fitted with more road-suitable tyres without problems. Smaller disadvantages ...


2

CX is often about carrying your bicycle as much as your bicycle carrying you. When carrying a bicycle on one's axle, its aero properties do not play any role, I would guess, while its weight does. CX bikes are actually designed so that they can be carried in a specific efficient manner (pay attention to how the man above holds the handlebar). A larger front ...


-5

Being a CX race, I expect it to consist of mostly asphalt and dirt roads. In those circumstances air drag plays a huge role (it is proportional to the square of velocity). Thus do learn to lean onto the handlebars. I can't produce a picture right now, so I'll describe it. Sit firmly. Your ass and legs are supporting you. You hands observe zero push and zero ...


0

You'll gain several advantages Comfort Versatility Durability Relaxed position Some cons Speed Weight (only matters during acceleration) Difficulty in finding suitable racks but this is easily overcome You'd need to harden the suspension and lock out the shocks im guessing as well.


0

Dropper posts are not much different when it comes to bike fitting when you think about them being at their full extension. You should reposition a seat post to such an insertion depth that the saddle's position is comfortable for you to pedal. Then, there are issues of the saddle being at its lowest position (on full suspension frames it might occasionally ...


0

I think it's a 2004 model but it could be 2005 model for more information ask the dealer


3

Please take your bike to a competent bike mechanic. We can explain how to properly adjust and maintain a threadless headset. We can also give you hints on how it has to be assembled. However, that you are asking this question shows that you are not at a point where you can fix it so that someone can ride confidently. If the steering, headset, or stem fail a ...


1

I had that kind of frame for a mountain bike back in 1997. Almost the same design with Ritchey stamp name at the drop outs and hub mounts. Except the cable mounts are located at the side of the top tube. I bought mine with only a thin primer paint and had it custom painted in white. The bike store where I bought it told me that it was a Ritchey frame and I ...


3

Answer: Its all about risk (for you) and liability (for the maker/seller) A bike rated at for a X kilos will not suddenly fail at X+1 kilos. However beyond this point, the likelihood of load spikes increases, so the whole bike suffers and deteriorates faster even if you only ever ride in steady state. This might be known as the "knee/elbow" of a ...


4

I don't know the severity because I rarely encounter recent mountain FDs and hacky setups for them even less, but what will happen is the contact it makes with the chain when shifting off of the small ring will be suboptimal. That kind of problem will vary with what cog the chain is on in back, i.e. better in the lower gears. There can also be problems with ...


2

Ugh! Bicycle disc brakes are not without their weaknesses. The frequent attention and adjustment they require due to noise or pad rub is particularly irksome to me, closely followed by the system's ridiculous intolerance to pad contamination (really? That sort of flaw considering the environment they're to be used in?), the recommended "fix" ...


1

Scott Genius, Ransom and Gambler are designed to be used with either 29" or 27.5" wheels. ONE FRAME TWO WHEEL SIZES With our mountain bikes, we try to achieve ultimate versatility. These specific models can switch from 27.5" to 29" or from 24" to 26" wheels with nothing more than the flip of a chip. No need to change the fork, ...


2

27.5x2.8 and 29x2.4 have approximately the same outside diameter of the inflated tire. Same with 27.5x3 and 29x2.5-6ish. All 27+ bikes can run 29; it's implicit whether they're marketed as such or not, although many are. In the other direction, bikes presented as native 29, there may not be enough side clearance for a 27+. Older 29ers would typically not ...


2

First, it's not clear which gear you mean by "12th". Is it the largest or smallest one? It sounds like your rear derailleur is not properly adjusted. As 11 of your 12 gears apparently work fine, it's most likely a problem with the limit screw for derailleur. It's probably not allowing the derailleur to travel far enough. Park Tool has quite a few ...


1

You did not give us any really specific description of the problem. Therefore, any tutorial for adjusting V brakes should apply. If it is grabbing on one side, you adjust those small screws at the pivot. One of them is visible in your photograph. Using those you make the calipers to be centered around your rim. Then you just adjust the cable pull using your ...


5

You have V-Brakes. These take some setting up but should work okay. Steps: Check your wheel rims are true. If there's a buckle or sideways-wobble in the rim, then the brake pads have to be further apart, so true the wheel with a spoke key. Check the brake lever is operating smoothly, with enough "yoink" in the spring to return to the open ...


3

So it looks like the cantilever brake stud was pressed/punched into the frame from the rear of the brake tab, like in this photo, about 25 years ago. Over time and with braking this connection failed, and also maybe the bolt holding the canti arm onto the stud came loose and was lost. The non-invasive fix is to buy a replacement cantilever brake stud, ...


8

You could replace the crank with any Shimano 2x9 crank for a square taper cartridge bottom bracket (with the same chainring sizes are crank arm length or course). If the bike is equipped with an Altus groupset then an Altus 2x9 crank would be a reasonable choice. There is a bit of an annoying wrinkle to this, different square taper crank models require ...


6

It might be possible to make a new thread using helicoil. It is a job for a good bike-shop but should be cheaper than a good pair of cranks.


1

You can get cantilever bosses with a threaded end that can be removed from frames if your using disc brakes. That's definitely savable but it will take someone with an ounce of common sense to fix.


2

It's hard to get a better bike than a mountain bike for going up and down hills. Even a cheap one. The geometry is set up so it's controllable both up and down steep hills, and the gearing almost certainly goes low enough that you'll be able to pedal up even the steepest of hills (as long as you're strong enough to push the combined weight if you, your ...


1

This is a common conundrum for new bike commuters! Yes, there are certainly bikes out there that will be better for you at hill-climbing or commuting in general. However, it's hard to know if it's worth the investment until you know for sure that you want to continue commuting by bicycle... but it's hard to know if you want to continue commuting by bicycle ...


15

The brake pivot broke off the frame in a very unusual way. A framebuilder may be able to contrive a pretty cheap way of fixing it by putting a new pivot stud in. This would still require removing the paint in the area, but it wouldn't necessarily be that bad. Minimum prices for framebuilders to even get into repair j jobs are typically in the $100-200 range ...


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