12

For Germany, the go-to answer is to buy the ADFC-Radtourenkarte for your region, and use that to get ideas where nice bike routes are located. The advantages of these cards are numerous: They use a scale that's suitable to biking, 1:150'000. A bike is about 5 times as fast as a pedestrian, and a car is 3 to 4 times faster than a bike. As such, car maps are ...


9

You could use Komoot, which is an app and a website which can give you recommended rides around your area and you can plan your own. On the discover page of Komoot you can search routes in your area and/or filter by region and categories (seasons, type of biking, etc...)


8

An approach that works well if you have a good memory. Just go out and ride. Memorize the route while riding. When you feel like you don't want to ride more than the same distance again, just turn back and ride the same route in reverse to your home. Next time, you can start in the same route but turn differently in some turn. Gradually you'll start to build ...


8

I don't know about Germany specifically, but I used to use Strava for finding places to ride. If you have an account, you can go to Explore and select Segment Explore. You can move around the map and it will show you segments that people have uploaded. Its a good way of finding popular places for cycling, although they can often be places where people go to ...


6

I would like to add CyclOSM to the recommendations: https://www.cyclosm.org/ This layer for Open Street Maps will show you a lot of useful information for planning your own bike tours. If you also want this layer paired with a router you can use: https://bikerouter.de/ A router is a program that finds a route according to your preferences. Here you can read ...


3

Two websites I use to find routes are RideWithGPS (for road and off-road rides) and TrailForks (for mountain biking). I've also used RideWithGPS to plan my own routes; I'm not sure if TrailForks can do something similar, I just use it to find trails. I just checked, they both have rides available in Germany. Both websites are also available as mobile apps. ...


3

When I got back into cycling, I would find a destination with some reason for going there, and as long as I wasn't moving something large/heavy/fragile, then the bike was a valid solution. With a start/end and a single waypoint I could then look at the roads joining the two points, and pick out features to avoid (motorways/highways, certain intersections, ...


3

Openrouteservice has a function for "Round trip routing". This service will suggest a randomly generated (roughly) circular route. The user states where they want to start, how for they want to ride (or hike, drive, or even wheelchair), and optionally configures a random seed (for reproduceability). Openrouteservice then figures out the rest. ...


3

I suggest you to have a look at brouter.de . Not immediate, but extremely useful and based on OpenStreetMap data, it allows you to correctly consider (possible) heavy traffic and ground quality (tarmac, gravel, bare earth and roots? all these infos can be made available).


1

I took a trip to Europe a few summers ago and wanted routes to run in each of the town/cities I visited. I used Google maps to find the location of where I was staying, then to explore the area looking for likely looking roads. Since I was running, not cycling, I looked for things like parks and sidewalks instead of lightly trafficked roads and bike lanes, ...


1

There's a collection of well curated and well presented routes around London and the south-east of the UK at https://www.routes.cc. I have done a couple and would recommend it!


1

It's worth having a look for local cycling groups, for example on Facebook if you use it. Plenty of people there will suggest destinations and outline routes (take xxx road to yyy town, where there's a good cafe). You may even get some riding companions out of it. While some groups are closely linked to fast clubs, others are much broader, and more open ...


1

Your phone would be great for navigation, but not so much for working with sensors. I have had good luck with Garmin (1030 - I figured if I was spending that kind of money, do it once vs. getting a cheaper model that I may want to upgrade later) head units, but I do not primarily use it to navigate. I like the metrics it provides. I usually plan my route ...


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